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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Indiresh Anand, Avril Smith, Kelly-Jo Charge and Christos Kouimtsidis

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate and improve the quality of the aftercare services we provide for alcohol dependence. This presentation discusses the patient…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate and improve the quality of the aftercare services we provide for alcohol dependence. This presentation discusses the patient satisfaction of the Relapse Prevention Group.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a prospective service users' satisfaction survey of those who attended the relapse prevention group programme at the Community Drug and Alcohol Team for the first 11 months of programme implementation.

Findings

In all, 33 out of 36 people participated in the evaluation. The overall results were positive for the whole programme and people felt that the programme helped them in their recovery.

Originality/value

Monitoring of service users’ satisfaction with aftercare services could provide insight into the barriers compromising engagement.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Don Revill

Describes the second new learning resource centre in Liverpool John Moores University. It provides 5,500sq. m. on four floors giving 200 PC places and a further 500 study…

Abstract

Describes the second new learning resource centre in Liverpool John Moores University. It provides 5,500sq. m. on four floors giving 200 PC places and a further 500 study seats. Discusses the problems faced in choosing an appropriate site. Compares the physical arrangement with the “ideal‐type” of a converged service represented by the Aldham Robarts Learning Resource Centre. Gives floor plans.

Details

New Library World, vol. 98 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

John Lalor and Liz Poulson

Adults with intellectual disabilities are the most psychotropically medicated population of all. Non-medically trained care staff with whom these individuals spend the…

Abstract

Purpose

Adults with intellectual disabilities are the most psychotropically medicated population of all. Non-medically trained care staff with whom these individuals spend the majority of their time are generally poorly trained in issues surrounding psychotropic medication. Much of the research related to the experiences of staff working in intellectual disability services has focused on medically trained professionals, and clients, and has been of a quantitative nature. Very little attention has been paid to care staff, their experiences, and through a qualitative approach. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study employed a semi-structured interview methodology to explore the experiences of, and impact on, care staff in relation to psychotropic medication usage in adults with intellectual disabilities living in long-term residential care. Eight full-time, experienced care staff were interviewed and data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith et al., 2009).

Findings

The paper demonstrates an array of concerns for staff, such as the negative impact upon client quality-of-life, the ethical implications of the medications’ regime, and the relationship perceived by care staff with the organisation management; and a significant lack of training. The limited field of previous research demographically comparable to the present paper was analysed for findings.

Originality/value

The paper helps expand the current literature on experiences of care staff for people with intellectual disabilities from their own perspective, explores the emotional impact of the organisation's treatment of clients, and offers a range of recommendations in terms of theory, clinical practice and research.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Pierre‐Yves Guay et Sylvain Lefebvre

International tourism is steadily growing. Some people welcome this growth which supports economic and social development. Others are suspicious and afraid of the threat…

Abstract

International tourism is steadily growing. Some people welcome this growth which supports economic and social development. Others are suspicious and afraid of the threat which tourism could create for the tourist destinations, the loss of cultural identity and of social alienation to its society. Reality is more complex than these two contrary positions suggest. After analyzing the existent attempts to explain the social effects of tourism, this paper intends to illustrate the variability of these effects. In this regard, the globalisation of human activities and its consequences on cultural identity are taken into account.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Avril Bell, Lesley Patterson, Morgan Dryburgh and David Johnston

Natural disaster stories narrate unsettling natural events and proffer scripts for social action in the face of unforeseen and overwhelming circumstances. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Natural disaster stories narrate unsettling natural events and proffer scripts for social action in the face of unforeseen and overwhelming circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate stories of natural disasters recounted for New Zealand school children in the School Journal during its first 100 years of publication.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is used to categorise the disaster event and to identify two distinct periods of disaster stories – imperial and national. Textual analysis of indicative stories from each period centres on the construction of social scripts for child readers.

Findings

In the imperial period tales of individual heroism and self‐sacrifice predominate, while the national period is characterised by stories of ordinary families, community solidarity and survival. Through this investigation of natural disaster stories for children, the paper identifies the shifting models of heroic identity offered to New Zealand children through educational texts.

Originality/value

This study adds to the existing literature on the School Journal and to the broader study of the history of imperialist and nationalist education in New Zealand. In these times of increased disaster awareness it also draws attention to the significance of disaster narratives in offering social scripts for children to draw on in the event of an actual disaster experience.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Avril Blamey, Jacki Gordon, Kim Newstead and Jacqueline McDowell

The purpose of this paper is to present learning on the strategies used by cooking skills practitioners and the programme theories, behaviour change mechanisms/contexts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present learning on the strategies used by cooking skills practitioners and the programme theories, behaviour change mechanisms/contexts and intended outcomes associated with these in varied contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Grey literature from Scottish cooking skills courses were reviewed using realist principles. Intervention implementation variables were identified and iteratively coded to uncover intended intervention strategies and programme theories. The lack of robust evaluation processes and outcome data in the grey literature prevented the testing of intended programme theories against outcomes. Alternatively, implementation strategies were aligned against behavioural-theory constructs contained in national guidance. Prioritised theories were further clarified/refined using practitioner and participant focus group data. Learning was used to inform future practice/evaluation.

Findings

Courses targeted and reached vulnerable individuals. Practitioners articulated multiple theories and assumptions about how strategies may work. Numerous strategies and behaviour constructs were used to target, tailor and reinforce cooking/food and wider social outcomes. Mechanisms were assumed to be triggered by different contexts and lead to varied outcomes. Strategies used were consistent with evidenced behaviour change constructs and guidelines. Interventions aimed to achieve non-cooking/social outcomes as well as cooking ones – including potential mediators of cooking behaviour, e.g. self-confidence. Contexts facilitated/limited the use of certain strategies. Limitations in course design, reporting and self-evaluation need to be addressed.

Practical implications

Recommendations for improving intervention commissioning, design and evaluation using realist principles are provided.

Originality/value

Learning addresses gaps in knowledge about the implementation of cooking skills interventions identified from systematic reviews and can improve course design and evaluation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the…

Abstract

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the woman still be covered by the Act if she were employed on like work in succession to the man? This is the question which had to be solved in Macarthys Ltd v. Smith. Unfortunately it was not. Their Lordships interpreted the relevant section in different ways and since Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome was also subject to different interpretations, the case has been referred to the European Court of Justice.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Jennifer Feitosa, Christine Kreutzer, Angela Kramperth, William S. Kramer and Eduardo Salas

The purpose of this paper is to first, synthesize employee characteristics that have been shown to help expatriate adjustment into best practices that can aid in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first, synthesize employee characteristics that have been shown to help expatriate adjustment into best practices that can aid in expatriate selection. Second, the authors aim to identify training design variables that can be implemented to not only increase learning and expatriate adjustment, but also to maximize the benefits of employee characteristics. Finally, the authors point out environmental factors that are often overlooked, but yet important influencing forces of expatriate adjustment.

Design/methodology/approach

PsychINFO was searched using variations of the following terms: expatriate selection and expatriate training. For the selection criteria, the authors selected articles in which cross-cultural adjustment, expatriate performance, or learning was the dependent variable. Reference sections of these articles were then cross-referenced for additional support. Authors then double-coded every article independently to record variables, study methodology, and research results.

Findings

The authors have identified cultural intelligence, learning orientation, technical KSAO's, and language skills to be the most significant antecedents of expatriate adjustment. Furthermore, the authors have found environmental factors (i.e. organizational, family, and interpersonal support) to play a crucial role in the adjustment process. The authors have also identified training factors (i.e. content, process, and elements) to be crucial, and the authors propose how these design variables further facilitate learning and adjustment.

Originality/value

This manuscript contributes to the extant expatriate adjustment literature by providing a new, integrative framework. While the individual variables explored within the paper have been examined in past research, this manuscript is the first to offer a framework which integrates them to shape future research.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1919

The opening of a new volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD coincides with the publication of a White Paper which is in many respects the most important pronouncement upon libraries…

Abstract

The opening of a new volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD coincides with the publication of a White Paper which is in many respects the most important pronouncement upon libraries made since the publication of the Parliamentary Report of 1850. Almost simultaneously we receive the news that the preliminaries of the University School in. Librarianship have been completed, an event which is not officially connected with the White Paper, but which is a remarkable corollary to it, because this School, if it succeeds in its aim, must revolutionize the whole library service—most librarians realize that.

Details

New Library World, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Martina G. Gallarza, Irene G. Saura and Haydée C. Garcí

Tourism research is usually based on quantitative rather than theoretical and conceptual studies. However, as a new discipline this phenomenon needs a more theoretical…

Abstract

Tourism research is usually based on quantitative rather than theoretical and conceptual studies. However, as a new discipline this phenomenon needs a more theoretical approach. It could help to find an interdisciplinary consensus on tourism. The authors consider service marketing as an interesting approach from an intradisciplinary perspective. They think that it could be an instrument for a better understanding of tourism.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

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