Search results

1 – 10 of 66
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Yoel Asseraf and Aviv Shoham

Drawing on the resource-based view, dynamic capabilities and exploration literatures, the purpose of this paper is to simultaneously investigate the impact of outside-in…

Downloads
1742

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the resource-based view, dynamic capabilities and exploration literatures, the purpose of this paper is to simultaneously investigate the impact of outside-in (OI) and inside-out (IO) strategic approaches on international strategic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based quantitative study was used. The final sample consisted of 202 internationally active SBUs of Israeli firms. Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

OI approach to strategy enhances international performance more than IO does. OI is antecedent of exploratory marketing capabilities (MCs), while IO is antecedent of exploratory technological capabilities (TCs). The direct positive effect of exploratory MCs on performance is twice as strong as exploratory TCs are. Additionally, exploratory MCs positively impact performance through product adaptation.

Practical implications

To enhance international performance, managers should devote attention to an OI approach by incorporating a market orientation with responsive flexibility. Managers should be aware that exploratory MCs are more important in an international context than exploratory TCs are. Stakeholders such as venture capitalists can use the OI–IO model to predict which international venture is more promising.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the international marketing field by shedding light on the OI–IO debate, its transformation into exploratory capabilities and how it relates to the standardization–adaptation debate. New and broad OI–IO’s conceptualizations are developed and new viewpoints for understanding how international marketing should work and what motivates firms to adapt are offered. Overall, an OI–IO typology helps to bring order to an otherwise confusing conceptual landscape.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Yoel Asseraf and Aviv Shoham

While globalization has made it easier to consume foreign products, consumption decisions are rarely straightforward. Both love and hate relationships between consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

While globalization has made it easier to consume foreign products, consumption decisions are rarely straightforward. Both love and hate relationships between consumers and countries exist and can even coexist. This paper aims to gain a better understanding of how positive/negative and general/specific consumer attitudes impact foreign product judgment and ownership. An integrative model explores the predictive power of affinity, animosity, cosmopolitanism and ethnocentrism simultaneously. Specifically, the authors investigate a paradoxical “tug of war” which takes place inside consumer minds – the coexistence of affinity and animosity toward the same country.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative approach, the authors analyze data from 202 consumers and test it in intra-national and international contexts.

Findings

The results demonstrate the importance of an integrative model that takes into account opposing impacts on consumer behavior. Additionally, the data reveal that affinity and animosity are not bi-polar endpoints on a continuum. Finally, affinity outweighs animosity with respect to impacting product judgment and ownership.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in Israel. Hence, replications in other multi-cultural countries are needed.

Practical implications

Marketers can use a segmentation matrix to target audiences based on the existing “attitudinal mix” in their focal markets. Marketers can use the affinity drivers identified here to overcome animosity.

Originality/value

The “tug of war” model advances the animosity model, as it implies that to use attitudinal data theoretically and practically, there is a need to account for a full spectrum of general and country-specific attitudes. Affinity was tested for the first time within national borders.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Yoel Asseraf, Luis Filipe Lages and Aviv Shoham

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a new conceptualization of international marketing agility (IMA). Importantly, the empirical test includes…

Downloads
1735

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a new conceptualization of international marketing agility (IMA). Importantly, the empirical test includes agility’s drivers, outcomes and boundary conditions for its impact on international market performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on the resource-based view and dynamic capabilities theories to develop a model and test it quantitatively via structural equation modeling with survey data from 195 Israeli exporters. In addition, the authors seek insights into the findings through post hoc in-depth interviews.

Findings

The results indicate that IMA enhances international market performance directly as well as indirectly through exporter’s new products advantage. Interestingly, while promotion adaptation strengthens the positive effect of IMA on new products advantage, product adaptation does not.

Research limitations/implications

Managers need to develop and improve marketing planning and flexibility maintenance capabilities. Furthermore, while maintaining an emphasis on marketing planning, they need to guard against inertia by embracing outside views, a wider range of solutions and a greater awareness of others’ decision-making styles to develop flexibility maintenance capability and achieve superior IMA.

Originality/value

A new conceptualization and operationalization of agility specific to an international marketing context is tested empirically. The complementary role of marketing planning capability and flexibility maintenance capability is demonstrated. Importantly, the vital role of new products advantage as a mediator between agility and performance is examined and the moderating role of international marketing strategy adaptation is investigated.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Ruth Segev and Aviv Shoham

This study aims to explore the dual identity role of joint gift-giving among adolescents. Studying this phenomenon through the lens of impression management theory enabled…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the dual identity role of joint gift-giving among adolescents. Studying this phenomenon through the lens of impression management theory enabled us to analyze private and group motives, drivers of these motives (givers’ public self-consciousness and self-monitoring and group cohesiveness) and the influence of group motives on the joint process. The characteristics of the joint process reflect a mutual social activity that enables adolescents to strengthen social group ties and define and nurture group identity. This research showed how a mutual consumer process, specifically, joint gift-giving, enhances the outcomes of social resources by defining groups’ mutual extended selves.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, quantitative tools were used. Selection of constructs for the study was based on a literature review and existing qualitative research. To test the validity and the reliability of the scales, a convenience sample of 103 adolescents (13 to 16 years old) was used in a pre-test survey. In the main study, a convenience sample of 129 adolescences was used. Self-report questionnaires were distributed to adolescents (aged 13-16 years). The survey included scales covering private and group motives for joint gift-giving, givers’ personality, group cohesiveness and the characteristics of the joint process.

Findings

Givers’ public self-consciousness and self-monitoring were positively related to the motivation to engage in joint gift-giving to facilitate the development of desired private identities. High public self-consciousness and self-monitoring givers were motivated to enhance their private role in the group task and managed their impression among multiple audiences. We found that high-cohesiveness groups were motivated to nurture and strengthen social resources through joint gift-giving. Engaging in joint gift-giving is motivated not only by functional motives (e.g. saving money) but also by social motives that strengthen a group’s extended-self and social resources that all members enjoy.

Research limitations/implications

Although gift-giving is a three-stage process per gestation presentation and reformulation stage, the current study explored joint gift-giving behavior only in the gestation stage. Future research should include the other two stages. Also the current research concentrated on adolescents. Exploring joint gift-giving among adults is recommended as well. Comparing the two age groups should allow a better understanding of the special characteristics of adolescents and adults. Additionally, other personality characteristics could affect givers private identity in the group task and other group characteristics such as group size gender of members and group context in the workplace could affect identity.

Practical implications

This research can provide marketers with a deeper understanding of the joint gift-giving process. For example, marketers should recognize that joint gift-giving involves adolescent groups’ time-consuming activities in the joint process, i.e. gift selection effort, making handmade gifts and putting special efforts in gift appearance that enable them to define and nurture their group identity.

Social implications

Parents and educators should recognize the importance of social identity dual role in participating in joint gift-giving. Hence, we recommend them to encourage adolescents to participate in this joint consuming process to enable them to protect and define their identity.

Originality/value

Adolescents are an important market segment with unique cognitive, social and personality processes. While these processes have been explored in several consumer behavior studies, adolescents’ gift-giving has been largely ignored in the literature. This study contributes to an understanding of the drivers of private and group joint gift-giving motives, how sense of belonging and group identity are reflected in the social dynamics of joint gift-giving and how adolescents manage group and private impressions in the eyes of a single receiver and in the eyes of multiple peers participating in the group task.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2020

Yoel Asseraf, Itzhak Gnizy and Aviv Shoham

Marketing doctrine (MD) refers to a “firm's unique principles, distilled from its experiences, which provide firm-wide guidance on market-facing choices” (Challagalla et

Abstract

Purpose

Marketing doctrine (MD) refers to a “firm's unique principles, distilled from its experiences, which provide firm-wide guidance on market-facing choices” (Challagalla et al., 2014, p. 4). Drawing on the knowledge-based view, the purpose of this paper is to develop a model of how MD is used and provide the first quantitative test of its relationship with business success.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors advance the understanding of MD by providing a mixed-methods paper. In Study 1, a survey-based quantitative study was used. The final sample comprised 349 internationally active strategic business units (SBUs) of Israeli firms. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling. Study 2 provides insights into the use of MD based on 20 in-depth interviews.

Findings

The cross-sectional evidence shows that there tends to be more MD Use in higher-performing firms. The important roles of MD Clarity and MD Knowledgeability as mobilising processes of MD Use are demonstrated. Learning by doing impacts MD Use only through MD Clarity and MD Knowledgeability.

Practical implications

MD is a new strategic tool that can be applied practically. MD may provide a straightforward way of communication between international ventures. MD Use may allow global consistency and flexibility within local markets, simultaneously. Therefore, marketing managers are advised to supplement MD to their portfolio of management tools.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to investigate empirically, through newly developed scales, whether and how MD's core processes (learning by doing, MD Clarity, MD Knowledgeability and MD Use) are related to the success of international ventures.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Muris Cicic, Paul Patterson and Aviv Shoham

Madsen synthesized international performance studies and identified 20 performance antecedents. Of these, 12 are unrelated to international performance or have conflicting…

Downloads
1682

Abstract

Madsen synthesized international performance studies and identified 20 performance antecedents. Of these, 12 are unrelated to international performance or have conflicting relationships across the reviewed studies. We use his recommendations to increase the value of international performance research. First, we include seven antecedents that cover the organizational, environmental, strategic, and performance domains of his model, including components of the market orientation model. Second, earlier studies involved mostly North American and European goods exporters. This study extends previous research to the service sector in Australia. Based on responses from 181 exporters, the importance of managerial attitudes, perceived international barriers, and human resource efforts is shown to affect international performance.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Aviv Shoham and Vassilis Dalakas

This study replicated an earlier study conducted in the USA and examined Israeli families’ decision making regarding various products and decision‐making stages. The…

Downloads
5437

Abstract

This study replicated an earlier study conducted in the USA and examined Israeli families’ decision making regarding various products and decision‐making stages. The results revealed that teenage children have influence over family purchases, particularly for products relevant to them (like cereal and vacations) and during the initiation stage. Moreover, consistent with the ranking of Israel as a low power‐distance country, Israeli teens had higher influence than US teens on family decisions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Aviv Shoham and Vassilis Dalakas

The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of Israeli children on family decision making.

Downloads
7901

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of Israeli children on family decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were used, replicating two different approaches that have been used to measure children's influence with US children. In study one, a survey was given to each parent, whereas, in study two, a survey was given to each parent and their child.

Findings

Findings indicate that Israeli children have a similar influence to US children, suggesting that, overall, Israeli children exercise quite strong influence on family decision making. This was the case when rated by children, as well as by both mothers and fathers.

Research limitations/implications

Two main ways to improve on this kind of research in the future are using a non‐convenience sample and collecting data from multiple countries for cross‐cultural comparisons.

Practical implications

One important implication of the findings is that children across cultures tend to have higher influence for products that are more relevant for them; therefore, marketers should concentrate their efforts primarily on the children.

Originality/value

An important contribution of this research is that it examines children's influence on family decision making in cultures different from the USA. For example, Israel is less individualistic, more uncertainty‐avoiding, and less power‐distant than the USA.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Aviv Shoham and Maja Makovec Brenčič

Consumer compulsive buying is an important area of inquiry in consumer behavior research. The importance of studying compulsive buying, stems, in part, from its nature as…

Downloads
21224

Abstract

Consumer compulsive buying is an important area of inquiry in consumer behavior research. The importance of studying compulsive buying, stems, in part, from its nature as a negative aspect of consumer behavior. Specifically, exploring negative consumption phenomena could provide modified or new perspectives for the study of positive consumption behaviors. Moreover, research on negative facets of consumption is useful because it can potentially contribute to society’s wellbeing, an important criterion for usefulness of any research. This paper builds on earlier papers to propose a model of compulsivity antecedents. Gender, consumers’ tendency to make unplanned purchases, and their tendency to buy products not on shopping lists, serve to predict compulsive tendencies in a sample of Israeli consumers. The findings suggest that these antecedents affect compulsive tendencies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Aviv Shoham, Gregory M. Rose and Fredric Kropp

To assess quantitatively the impact of market orientation on the performance of the firm. While much empirical work has centered on market orientation, the…

Downloads
6234

Abstract

Purpose

To assess quantitatively the impact of market orientation on the performance of the firm. While much empirical work has centered on market orientation, the generalizability of its impact on performance has been under‐researched.

Design/methodology/approach

A substantive meta‐analysis quantitatively summarizes the results of empirical studies of the direct and indirect impact of market orientation on three outcomes. A second, methodological meta‐analysis assessed the influence of methodological variables on explained variance in performance.

Findings

The direct, indirect, and total impacts of market orientation on performance were all significant. Additionally, the geographic location of the study and the performance measure used (but not the scale) affected explained variance.

Research limitations/implications

First, across study contexts, market orientation affects performance. Second, its impact might be stronger than previously thought due to the indirect paths not considered in previous research. Third, the strength of its impact depends on the country in which it was implemented; managers should expect higher payoffs in less developed countries.

Originality/value

The findings of this study significantly refine the body of knowledge concerning the impact of market orientation on the performance of the firm, and thereby offer an improved conceptual framework for marketing planners.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 10 of 66