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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Roger Orpwood, Tim Adlam, Nina Evans, James Chadd and David Self

This paper presents the results of a study evaluating a complete autonomous smart home installation in an apartment in a care home, and the impact it had on the behaviour…

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study evaluating a complete autonomous smart home installation in an apartment in a care home, and the impact it had on the behaviour and independence of someone with quite severe dementia (Mini Mental State Examination, or MMSE, of 10). It describes the technology that has been evolved for this purpose, and how the apartment was configured. The evaluation compared the behaviour of the resident before and after the switching on of a wide range of autonomous support technology, by analysing the logged sensor data, through a questionnaire‐based outcome measure, and through transcribed interviews. The technology enabled the client to retain a lot of independence. It helped him to regain urinary continence, improved his sleep from around 3.5 hours per night to 5.5, and halved the number of night‐time wanderings. The paper concludes with a series of recommendations for future work in this area.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2020

Hariprasath Manoharan, Adam Raja Basha, Yuvaraja Teekaraman and Abirami Manoharan

In recent days, there is a huge loss in the income of farmers due to the reasons such as low water lever and increased pesticide attack. Therefore, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent days, there is a huge loss in the income of farmers due to the reasons such as low water lever and increased pesticide attack. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to establish an efficient reliable low-cost information gathering Reliable Low-Cost Information Gathering Protocol (RLCIG) protocol for agricultural water irrigation using optimal clustering and path selection technique where the RCIG protocol wrinkles the expedient statistics about the moisture and temperature of the soil and it will be installed few inches below the pipeline. Thereafter, the congregated data will augment the irrigation of water by using a decision-making algorithm.

Design/methodology/approach

The projected model has been inscribed mathematically by underlying the wireless sensor networks (WSN) framework with deliberation of contemporary challenges. Furthermore, the energy, cost and expanse optimization framework in the WSN framework is presented. The projected technique has been tested using network simulator and the results are also integrated MATLAB.

Findings

Recently, for efficacious management in the field of agriculture, the WSN has been successfully assimilated. This instigation accomplishes the irrigation management in terms of energy, cost and communication distance. The simulation result shows that the proposed model yields better results in terms of both the transmission range and cost with efficient lifetime improvement in comparisons with existing techniques.

Originality/value

Agriculture is the need of the time whatever invention happens in the scientific world without food production no lives survive on the earth, hence, the scientific invention should also focus on agriculture, in this contrast, the authors have proposed an efficient low-cost information gathering (RCIG) protocol for agricultural water irrigation using optimal clustering and path selection technique.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2018

Sang M. Lee and Seongbae Lim

Abstract

Details

Living Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-716-0

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Steven Furnell and Samantha Dowling

The purpose of this paper is to review current evidence in relation to scale and impacts of cyber crime, including various approaches to defining and measuring the problem.

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1439

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current evidence in relation to scale and impacts of cyber crime, including various approaches to defining and measuring the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

A review and analysis of survey evidence is used to enable an understanding of the scope and scale of the cyber crime problem, and its effect upon those experiencing it.

Findings

The analysis evidences that cyber crime exists in several dimensions, with costs and harms that can be similarly varied. There is also a sense that, moving forward, the “cyber” label will become somewhat redundant as many crimes have the potential to have a technology component.

Research limitations/implications

The key evidence in this particular discussion has some geographic limitations, with much of the discussion focussed upon data drawn from the Crime Survey for England and Wales, as well as other UK-based sources. However, many of the broader points still remain more widely relevant.

Practical implications

This study helps in: better understanding the range and scale of cyber crime threats; understanding how the cyber element fits into the wider context of crime; improving the appreciation of what cyber crime can mean for potential victims; and recognising the cost dimensions, and the implications for protection and response.

Social implications

The discussion will help businesses and individuals to have a better appreciation of the cyber crime threat, and what ought to be considered in response to it.

Originality/value

The discussion is based upon recent evidence, and therefore represents a more up-to-date view of the cyber crime landscape than reviews already available in earlier literature.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Simon Jones

This paper aims to critically reassess established approaches to the teaching and analysis of computer ethics, and to propose a revised methodology, drawing on the…

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2076

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically reassess established approaches to the teaching and analysis of computer ethics, and to propose a revised methodology, drawing on the practical experience of teaching undergraduates in a culturally diverse, international learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical in scope, reviewing concepts and methods in the existing literature and developing an alternative inter-disciplinary and multi-dimensional framework.

Findings

Ethical analysis can benefit from broader, inter-disciplinary perspectives that take into account the social and economic context in which information and communication technologies (ICTs) are designed, deployed and used, and the complex forces that drive their development. A richer analysis of this context enables a better understanding of the specific properties and applications of ICTs which, in turn, foreground particular ethical issues. This can result in a more self-reflexive and rounded appreciation of the ethical, legal and professional issues invoked by ICTs.

Originality/value

The paper develops a revised, flexible methodology for doing ethics which can be applied to any case study or domain of application. It outlines some of the key questions and major ethical principles that are generated by ICTs. The paper has pedagogical value for both teachers and students of computer ethics, but has relevance also for information technology professionals and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Levent Altinay and Babak Taheri

The purpose of this study is to review and synthesise recent studies in the sharing economy literature and identify the knowledge gap and future opportunities for…

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2991

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review and synthesise recent studies in the sharing economy literature and identify the knowledge gap and future opportunities for hospitality and tourism researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study commences by introducing sharing economy models and strategic frameworks for profitable service enabler performance. Following this, it identifies emerging overarching theories (e.g. complexity theory, social exchange theory, norm activation model, and value co-creation) and some emerging themes (i.e. trust and reputation, disruptive behaviour, choice and segmentation, pricing strategies, socially excluded consumers, personality and satisfaction) in current hospitality and tourism studies from top-tier journals.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest new paths for advancing theoretical and practical implications for hospitality and tourism studies.

Practical implications

The themes, models and overarching theories reviewed in this study are relevant and insightful across the fulcrum of hospitality and tourism research. It offers several useful guides for practitioners and academics to trace relevant literature on different aspects of sharing economy and perceptibly highlight the gaps in existing studies.

Originality/value

The paper provides new directions to broaden interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches undertaken by scholars within both the field of hospitality and tourism management and beyond.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Luisa Gonçalves, Lia Patrício, Jorge Grenha Teixeira and Nancy V. Wünderlich

This article provides an in-depth understanding of customer experience with smart services, examines customer perceptual responses to smart and connected service…

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1131

Abstract

Purpose

This article provides an in-depth understanding of customer experience with smart services, examines customer perceptual responses to smart and connected service environments and enriches this understanding by outlining how contextual factors (in terms of goals, activities, actors and artifacts) influence the customer experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative approach in order to understand customer experience in the smart energy service setting. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with 31 participants forming three groups of energy service customers: advanced smart energy (ASE) customers, electric mobility (EM) customers and high-consumption (HC) customers.

Findings

The findings show that customer experience with smart services involves a multidimensional set of perceptual responses, comprising specific smart service dimensions (e.g. controllability, visibility, autonomy); relationship dimensions (relationships with the service provider and with the community); and traditional technology-enabled service dimensions (e.g. ease of use, accessibility). The analysis of contextual factors such as goals, activities, actors and artifacts shows that smart services enable a more autonomous experience, wherein customers can integrate a myriad of actors and artifacts and expect the main service provider to support them in taking the lead.

Originality/value

Smart technologies have profoundly changed the service environment, but research on customer experience with smart services is scarce. This study characterizes smart services, provides an in-depth understanding of customer experience in this new context, and discusses relevant implications for management and service research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Kevin Doughty and Gareth Williams

The use of telecare with appropriate domiciliary care packages may provide the means to manage many of the risks associated with the increasing number of older people who…

Abstract

The use of telecare with appropriate domiciliary care packages may provide the means to manage many of the risks associated with the increasing number of older people who wish to continue to live independently in their own homes. Those who become especially frail or disabled can retain their independence and quality of life if their homes are made ‘smart’. This paper discusses the range of services that are available, or under development, for the prototype ‘MIDAS’ (Modular Intelligent Domiciliary Alarm System) telecare system, which enable traditional community alarm, telecare and assistive technologies to be used in an integrated and intelligent fashion. A range of services that allow autonomous operation within the home (and hence increase the perceived independence of a client by decreasing the reliance on a response centre operator) known as ‘HAMISH’ may be used. It offers a wider range of cost‐effective services of relevance to both the individual, and to society, in different types of home environment including dispersed housing and new sheltered housing schemes.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Anne Nortcliffe and Andrew Middleton

Research into the autonomous use of MP3 audio recorders by students in UK higher education demonstrated that students were innovative in their autonomous use of the…

Abstract

Research into the autonomous use of MP3 audio recorders by students in UK higher education demonstrated that students were innovative in their autonomous use of the devices. They used them to capture learning conversations from formal and informal situations to personalise and enhance their learning. However, today smartphones and other smart devices have replaced the necessity for students to carry multiple mobile devices including MP3 recorders. This chapter builds upon the earlier work and presents a small qualitative study into how students are autonomously using their smart devices to support their learning. The research explores the hypothesis that students are being innovative in the ways in which they are using their smart devices to support their formal and informal learning. The study involved five students who own smart devices who were invited to discuss their ownership of smartphone and tablet technologies and the ways they used them in their studies. The students first completed a short questionnaire and were then interviewed in small groups. The results agree with previous research into student use of smart devices and describe autonomous engagement facilitated by personally owned smart technologies. The study identifies continuous patterns of pervasive engagement by students and concludes that more thought should be given to disruptive innovation, digital literacy and employability.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Mobile Applications: Smartphones, Skype and Texting Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-509-8

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Smart cities in China.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB242669

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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