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Article

Vishal Gupta

Integrating the behavioral theory of leadership, the componential theory of creativity and the self-determination theory (SDT), the study tests the relationships between…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating the behavioral theory of leadership, the componential theory of creativity and the self-determination theory (SDT), the study tests the relationships between leadership, work motivation (intrinsic motivation, integrated extrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation) and employee-level innovation (innovative work behavior and innovation outcomes) in a work setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a survey questionnaire from 493 scientists working in India's largest civilian research and development (R&D) organization. The structural equation modeling (SEM) method was used to test the hypothesized relationships between the study variables.

Findings

The study found evidence for positive relationships between leadership, employee autonomous motivation (intrinsic and integrated extrinsic motivation) and employee-level innovation. The study shows that extrinsic motivation is positively related to innovation only when the value of rewards is integrated to one's sense of self (integrated extrinsic motivation). Extrinsic motivation, otherwise, is not related to innovation.

Research limitations

The study was cross-sectional, so inferences about causality are limited.

Practical implications

First, while extrinsic motivation is considered bad for innovation, the study provides evidence that integrated extrinsic motivation complements intrinsic motivation and encourages employee-level innovation. Second, the study shows that leaders can aid the process of development of autonomous motivation by displaying positive behaviors. Third, the study validates the mediating role of autonomous motivation for the leadership–innovation relationship.

Originality/value

The study provides an insight into the underlying process through which leaders can impact innovation at the workplace. To the best of the author's knowledge, such a study is the first of its kind undertaken in an organizational context.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part

Lan Guo, Bernard Wong-On-Wing and Gladie Lui

The present research examines the effect of incentivizing both outcome and driver measures of SPMS on middle managers' proactivity in influencing the strategy formulation…

Abstract

The present research examines the effect of incentivizing both outcome and driver measures of SPMS on middle managers' proactivity in influencing the strategy formulation process. A case-based experiment was conducted among 74 full-time employees. The results suggest that when incentives are linked to both outcome and driver measures of SPMS, compared with when they are outcome-based and not linked to the SPMS, managers are more proactive in communicating strategy-related issues to top management. In addition, this effect of SPMS-based incentives on middle managers' proactivity is mediated by their autonomous extrinsic motivation to achieve strategic goals. The results are in general consistent with postulates of the self-determination theory of motivation. This chapter also has practical implication. Specifically, recent evidence suggests that most SPMS adopters fail to validate causal business models underlying their formulated strategies (Ittner, 2008; Ittner & Larcker, 2003, 2005). Middle managers' proactive strategic behavior may be one means to prompt top management to inspect formulated strategies and their underlying business models.

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Article

Jian Zhang, Ying Zhang, Yahui Song and Zhenxing Gong

Following self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of four motivational profiles (external, introjected, identified regulation…

Abstract

Purpose

Following self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of four motivational profiles (external, introjected, identified regulation, and intrinsic motivation) on work performance (interpersonal, adaptive, task, and dedicative performance). The authors also examined the proposed relations with longitudinal data.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in Studies 1 and 2 were from several companies in China. Employees completed the questionnaires to measure their work motivation, and managers completed the questionnaires to assess the subordinates’ work performance.

Findings

In Study 1, the authors found that identified regulation significantly predicted interpersonal performance and adaptive performance. External regulation, introjected regulation, and intrinsic motivation had no significant impacts on interpersonal, adaptive, task, or dedicative performance. In Study 2, the results revealed that identified regulation significantly predicted dedicative and interpersonal performance, but external regulation, introjected regulation, and intrinsic motivation had no significant impacts on the four types of performance. These two studies concluded that only identified regulation strongly predicts work performance.

Originality/value

The study has contributed to the body of knowledge by clarifying that identified regulation is an important type of motivation in the workplace. Managers might therefore focus on supporting employees for identifying with the organizational goals in order to promote better performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Book part

Jean-François Manzoni

Over the last decades, the accounting and control literature has featured much studying of and debate about the role and designing of incentives. Over the last year or so…

Abstract

Over the last decades, the accounting and control literature has featured much studying of and debate about the role and designing of incentives. Over the last year or so, the debate over incentives and bonuses has become a much more public one, as illustrated by the current public furor over bankers' bonuses and frequent calls to limit them and/or tax them more heavily. The public nature of the debate is new, but the emotional intensity is not; an intense emotionality has often characterized discussions of these subjects in print, as recently illustrated by a controversy between supporters and opponents of goal setting published in Academy of Management Perspectives.

This chapter tries to structure the debate by defining – and clarifying the interactions between – key components of the debate. I then review some – by no means all – of the evidence available in three streams of research: goal setting, self-determination theory, and economics. A surprisingly large number of commonalities emerge from this review. I then revisit in light of this review two accountability models I had introduced at a previous conference as well a forthcoming field study of the sophisticated approach developed by a successful multinational corporation.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Innovative Concepts and Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-725-7

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Article

Sushil S. Chaurasia, Surabhi Verma and Vibhav Singh

The purpose of this study is to develop a model that explains a user’s attitude toward M-payments in India, based on the motivational model and awareness about…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a model that explains a user’s attitude toward M-payments in India, based on the motivational model and awareness about demonetization policy. The study also investigates the validity and differential predictive power of four different M-payment usage models, by considering the effect of improved awareness regarding demonetization policy on the core construct of the motivational model.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested with survey data from 362 M-payment users using partial least squares. Respondents were M-payment users with significant usage experience.

Findings

This study empirically determined that the motivation model and awareness about demonetization policy in M-payment usage after demonetization are connected. As hypothesized, the study found: a positive relationship between extrinsic motivation and intention to use M-payment, positive relationship between awareness about demonetization policy and behavioral intention to use M-payment, positive relationship between intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation, positive relationship between awareness about demonetization policy and extrinsic motivation and positive moderation effect of awareness about demonetization policy on the extrinsic motivation-behavioral intention relationships. The hypothesis that awareness about demonetization policy would have a moderating effect on intrinsic motivation–behavioral intention relationship was not supported.

Practical implications

From a practitioner’s perspective, this study underscores the importance of raising sufficient awareness about the demonetization policy as a determinant of users’ willingness to use M-payment services. Mandatory regulations by the government and motivation toward M-payment use can be a good starting point for a cashless economy.

Originality/value

This study makes a needed contribution to the literature by validating the integrated motivation model, emphasizing the importance of raising awareness about the demonetization policy among M-payment users. The model may provide a useful foundation for future research in this area.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article

Manjari Soni, Kokil Jain and Isha Jajodia

The emergence of mHealth applications has led to the rise of health-based services delivered over smartphones. Younger people are often found to be more innovative toward…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of mHealth applications has led to the rise of health-based services delivered over smartphones. Younger people are often found to be more innovative toward technology, especially related to smartphones (Rai et al., 2013). Most mHealth application downloaders are continually shifting between applications because of the hyper-competition making achieving loyal consumers challenging (Racherla et al., 2012). The purpose of this paper is to study the determinants that help increase young consumers mHealth application loyalty. This study integrates self-determination theory (SDT), gamification elements and engagement to examine loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A valid sample of 263 college student’s data was obtained for data analysis from a survey conducted in multiple campuses of the Delhi University in India.

Findings

The three psychological needs: need for autonomy, need for competence and need for relatedness, showed a positive impact on intrinsic motivation. From the gamification factors; perceived playfulness, the level of challenge and social interaction, only the first two showed a positive impact on extrinsic motivation. Both motivation factors influence engagement, showing a frequent interaction with the application, leading to loyalty.

Originality/value

Previous studies examined the adoption of mHealth services, this study is one of the first to examine young consumers’ loyalty in using mhealth apps. It sheds light on the existing literature and contributes to research on mHealth applications by determining the factors that lead to loyalty by the young consumers.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article

Jungin Kim

Based on motivation theories, such as self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether intrinsic and extrinsic motivations significantly…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on motivation theories, such as self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether intrinsic and extrinsic motivations significantly influence burnout and turnover intention in the public sector. Furthermore, the authors assessed the mediating effect of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and public service motivation (PSM) on the relationship between intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and burnout/turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 203 public employees from local governments in South Korea, this study conducted ordinary least squares regression analysis to investigate the relationships among intrinsic/extrinsic motivation, OCB, PSM, and burnout/turnover intention.

Findings

The authors found that intrinsic motivation had a significantly negative effect on both burnout and turnover intention. Extrinsic motivation had a significantly positive effect only on burnout. Lastly, OCB and PSM had a mediating effect on the relationships between intrinsic motivation and burnout.

Originality/value

These results provide some insights into the effects of job motivation on burnout and turnover intention in the public sector. Particularly, this research highlights the importance of intrinsic motivation, OCB, and PSM in decreasing burnout and the importance of intrinsic motivation in decreasing turnover intention of public employees.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Geunpil Ryu and Seong-Gin Moon

This study aims to examine the effect of workplace learning experience and intrinsic learning motive on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. In addition, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of workplace learning experience and intrinsic learning motive on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. In addition, the study examined the moderating effect of intrinsic learning motives on the relationship between learning experience and job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research used the Human Capital Corporate Panel survey data set, which aimed to explore how human resource development practices influence corporate performance. In all, 10,003 samples from 441 companies were used for data analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that taking part in workplace learning programs positively affects job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Likewise, intrinsic learning motives are also positively related to work attitudes. However, no interaction effect between the intrinsic learning motive and the learning experience was found, which may imply that an autonomous extrinsic learning motive is a better predictor for explaining job satisfaction than is a purely intrinsic learning motive within an organizational context.

Originality/value

Little research has examined the actual effect of workplace learning programs on employees’ attitudes regarding job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, to the authors’ knowledge, no research has examined the moderating effect of intrinsic learning motive with workplace learning experience on employees’ positive work attitudes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Bård Kuvaas

The purpose of this study was to test the relationship between intrinsic motivation and work performance among individuals from a broad cross‐section of job types among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to test the relationship between intrinsic motivation and work performance among individuals from a broad cross‐section of job types among public employees with the objectives of contributing to self‐determination theory and assisting public management practice and research.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents were drawn from three municipalities located in Norway. A questionnaire was distributed to 2,015 employees through a web‐based tool (Questback), which resulted in complete data from 779 workers, representing a response rate of approximately 39 per cent.

Findings

The findings suggest that the relationships between job autonomy and work performance and task interdependence and work performance are partly mediated by intrinsic motivation, while the relationship between supervisor support for autonomy, competence, and development and work performance is fully mediated by intrinsic motivation.

Research limitations/implications

The two most important limitations, which are discussed in more detail at the end of the paper, are the cross‐sectional nature of the study and the reliance on self‐reported questionnaire data.

Practical implications

The results support self‐determination theory and suggest that public and private sector managers should pay more attention to autonomy‐supportive work environments.

Originality/value

First, a recent review of self‐determination theory casts doubt on the performance implications of intrinsic motivation for less complex or interesting tasks. Thus, in order to increase our knowledge of the quality of self‐determination theory as a work motivation theory, empirical research that spans a broad cross‐section of jobs and functions in organisations is needed. Second, and despite the importance of motivation among public employees in an era of transformation to a more business‐oriented approach, there is little empirical research on public sector employee motivation.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Helena Elisabeth Liewendahl and Kristina Heinonen

Customer value creation is dependent on a firm’s capacity to fulfil its brand promises and value propositions. The purpose of this paper is to explore frontline employees…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer value creation is dependent on a firm’s capacity to fulfil its brand promises and value propositions. The purpose of this paper is to explore frontline employees’ (FLEs’) motivation to align with value propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores FLEs’ motivation to align with a firm’s value propositions as operationalised brand promises. A longitudinal, three-phase case study was conducted on a business-to-business company in the building and technical trade sector.

Findings

This study reveals factors that foster and weaken employees’ motivation to align with a firm’s brand promises and value propositions. The findings show that co-activity and authentic, practice-driven promises and value propositions foster FLEs’ motivation to uphold brand promises and value propositions, whereas an objectifying stance and power struggle weaken their motivation.

Practical implications

The study indicates that a bottom-up approach to strategising is needed and that FLE is to be engaged in traditional managerial domains, such as in developing value propositions. By creating space and agency for FLE in the strategising process, their motivation to align with value propositions is fostered. Four motivational modes are suggested to support bottom-up strategising.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in its focus on FLEs’ motivation. Developing value propositions traditionally falls within the domain of management strategising, while employees are ascribed the role of enactment. Contrary to the established norm, this paper highlights employees’ active role in strategising and developing value propositions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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