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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

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Circuit World, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

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Microelectronics International, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

A. Angstenberger

Both the need for the introduction of automated optical inspection (AOI) systems in the PCB manufacturing process and the requirements, technically and on economic…

Abstract

Both the need for the introduction of automated optical inspection (AOI) systems in the PCB manufacturing process and the requirements, technically and on economic grounds, placed on such equipment are discussed in detail. Furthermore, emphasis is placed on the description of commonly used AOI concepts. The paper ends with a check list containing the most important questions concerning any system's capabilities.

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Circuit World, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Alex Alaluf and David Birnbaum

Examines the use of laser‐induced fluorescence for the inspection of printed circuit boards. Discusses how it works, how it compares with other inspection options and what…

Abstract

Examines the use of laser‐induced fluorescence for the inspection of printed circuit boards. Discusses how it works, how it compares with other inspection options and what advantages it offers, particularly for the inspection of low‐contrast materials. Concludes that laser‐based automated optical inspection (AOI) has major potential advantages compared with white‐light AOI equipment.

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Circuit World, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2007

P.I. Nicholson and P. Wallace

To present an overview of the research and development carried out by an EC Framework 6 part funded consortium, known as MICROSCAN, for the implementation of an in‐line…

Abstract

Purpose

To present an overview of the research and development carried out by an EC Framework 6 part funded consortium, known as MICROSCAN, for the implementation of an in‐line PCB inspection prototype system that is capable of offering comprehensive defect detection.

Design/methodology/approach

Four non‐destructive testing inspection modules based on digital radiography (X‐ray) inspection, thermal inspection, automatedoptical inspection and acoustic inspection have been integrated to form a combined inspection system.

Findings

A proof in principle in‐line PCB inspection system, utilising four different inspection techniques, has been developed and demonstrated. The system is based on a generic mechanical, electrical and software communications platform culminating in a flexible system that enables the inspection modules to be used separately, together or interchanged to give the best results in terms of inspection coverage and inspection throughput.

Research limitations/implications

In its current embodiment, the prototype is suited to inspection of high‐return PCBs, particularly those used in medical and aerospace products, rather than high‐throughput PCB production work. The X‐ray inspection module is the slowest inspection technique and combining four different inspection techniques reduces the inspection throughput of the whole system to that of the X‐ray inspection module. Further, trials and investigations need to be carried out to improve inspection throughput.

Originality/value

The novelty of the system is that it is the first time that four inspection techniques have been combined to give the capability of 100 per cent defect coverage.

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Circuit World, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

D. Thompson and T. Stroebel

Electronic packaging technologies, such as pin grid arrays, increasingly small pitch surface mount, and double‐sided assemblies are all aimed towards the highest possible…

Abstract

Electronic packaging technologies, such as pin grid arrays, increasingly small pitch surface mount, and double‐sided assemblies are all aimed towards the highest possible product density, with improved performance. The gap between inspection effectiveness and advances made in packaging technologies is becoming larger. As efforts proceed, to learn more about critical factors influencing reliability of solder joints, it is prudent to ensure that printed wiring assembly (PWA) design rules evolve to permit the broadest range of anticipated automated inspection requirements. The range of automated inspection technologies can all be made more effective through careful design of electronics for inspection. Significant opportunities lie in both PWA layout and design, as well as electronic component design, tolerancing, and standardisation. Many inspection issues are shared, but with increased recognition of digital radiography's unique capabilities; this discussion will emphasise X‐ray inspection issues.

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Circuit World, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Circuit World, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

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Circuit World, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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