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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Donald Cook and Lawrence Lockshin

Wine exports from Australia are expected to double within the next five years and much of this growth has been forecasted to occur in the traditionally non‐wine drinking…

Abstract

Wine exports from Australia are expected to double within the next five years and much of this growth has been forecasted to occur in the traditionally non‐wine drinking countries of the Pacific Rim. This paper, based on lengthy interviews with importers, agents, and buyers for various retail institutions in Thailand, uses a case study approach to argue that export strategies based on successful entry into the UK and US markets will be less efficient in the Pacific Rim. A detailed analysis of the market structure, including the types of wines and strategies of institutions from the top to the bottom end of the price spectrum is presented. The success of Australian producers entering the Thai market will be achieved only by changing the strategy they have used in the UK and US. A stronger focus on Australia must be made along with the use of fewer, but bigger agents and distributors. Marketing strategies for each type of retail institution are provided as well.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Rohan Jordan, Pietro Zidda and Larry Lockshin

The success of the Australian wine industry is well documented. However, there have been few comparative studies of the reasons for this success as compared to Australia's…

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3760

Abstract

Purpose

The success of the Australian wine industry is well documented. However, there have been few comparative studies of the reasons for this success as compared to Australia's main competitors. Most of the anecdotal evidence and trade publications focus on “value for money” and fruit‐driven wines, without looking at how the Australian wine businesses operate. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the external environment in France and Australia as one of the drivers for Australian wine sector success.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with two French and two Australian wineries and a review of the literature led to a series of hypotheses about the role of market orientation, strategic orientation, innovative and entrepreneurial environment orientation, constraining legislation, industry infrastructure usage, industry plan support, and interorganizational collaboration as factors differentiating the two countries. An online survey of wineries in the two countries resulted in a sample of 82 French and 63 Australian responses. An analysis of variance revealed significant differences between Australian wineries as compared to the French.

Findings

Australian wineries rated themselves higher in market orientation, growth strategy, export proactiveness, perceived innovative environment, perceived entrepreneurial environment, more interorganizational collaboration, and less perceived constraining legislation.

Practical implications

These results not only provide some basis for Australia's success in wine exporting, but also add to the literature on the effect of the external environment on business performance.

Originality value

Wine exporting countries can use the results to help shape policy for creating a more conducive environment for exporting wine.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Gordon McDougall and Larry Lockshin

The Tanunda Winery is a made‐up company facing a series of real world wine marketing issues. It has been successful domestically, but has not really looked to the global…

Abstract

The Tanunda Winery is a made‐up company facing a series of real world wine marketing issues. It has been successful domestically, but has not really looked to the global marketplace for growth. This case focuses on the decisions a medium sized winery must face when assessing the international marketplace and deciding which countries to enter. The case provides a reasonable amount of internal data for a medium‐sized (10,000–15,000 ton) winery, including financial and cost data. The case provides a great deal of information about the Australian wine industry and four of the most important wine export markets: the UK, the US, Canada, and Japan. Students can assess the opportunities available to Tanunda Winery and engage in real world cost‐benefit analysis in deciding which and how many countries to export to.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Trent Johnson and Johan Bruwer

The wine industry has been criticised in the past for adopting a mass‐marketing approach but in the current ultra‐competitive wine market the inevitable outcome of a…

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1396

Abstract

The wine industry has been criticised in the past for adopting a mass‐marketing approach but in the current ultra‐competitive wine market the inevitable outcome of a production rather than marketing orientation is almost certain failure. Whereas the Australian domestic wine market is currently experiencing a low growth rate, a precursor to any future growth strategy is a clear understanding of the market. Acceptance of market segmentation as a strategy to target consumers more effectively enhances the focus and differentiation essential to achieve growth in the wine market. Recently a new segmentation approach of lifestyle based on a cognitive deductive perspective that makes lifestyle specific to the area of wine consumption was developed by Bruwer et al. (2001). This process included the development of a wine‐related lifestyle (WRL) measurement research instrument and the identification of five wine‐related lifestyle market segments. In this paper, a study conducted in the Australian wine market on 363 consumers to empirically confirm or disconfirm the previously identified five wine‐related lifestyle segments is reported on. The further theoretically‐driven development and improvement of the WRL research instrument is also described.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Grant Battersby

Grape types grown in Australia have changed as a reflection of changes in consumers' tastes. Theres have been major changes in the Australian wine market in recent…

Abstract

Grape types grown in Australia have changed as a reflection of changes in consumers' tastes. Theres have been major changes in the Australian wine market in recent decades. The proportion of fortified wines has fallen from 81 per cent to ten percent of production and the popularity of different types of wine has varied. This has led to rapid changes in the types of grapes planted. The pattern of grape type use from 1972–91 at a small, long‐established winery gives a perspective on the general market trends. This winery adapted its use of particular grape types more quickly than the national average and has now established a pattern reflecting its expertise with fortified and red wines and regional characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Robert Eyler

American wineries have taken marketing steps toward attracting consumers. They employ tasting scores to augment and solidify market share. According to Oster (1999) and…

Abstract

American wineries have taken marketing steps toward attracting consumers. They employ tasting scores to augment and solidify market share. According to Oster (1999) and Porter (1985), competitive advantage comes from either cost advantages or product differentiation. American wineries use tasting scores they receive from experts as the basis for product differentiation and raising prices. To achieve competitive advantage, the product must be seen as important and an improvement in the market, while simultaneously lacking imitation. This article looks at how tasting scores given by wine experts may affect American firms' competitive advantage, barring entry by importing rivals, such as Australian firms. If these tasting scores provide product importance and improvements, while delivering a product that lacks imitation, competitive advantage may result. If importers to the US realise this, these firms can undermine American advantages, increase competition, and gain market share through their own competitive advantages.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Gordon McDougall

With the “internationalisation” of tastes amongst wineconsumers, the need to export wine has become ever more acute for wineproducers worldwide. As an example of how wine

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350

Abstract

With the “internationalisation” of tastes amongst wine consumers, the need to export wine has become ever more acute for wine producers worldwide. As an example of how wine producers have attempted to gain access to overseas markets, this case study examines the export drive of a major Australian winery.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Trent E. Johnson and Susan E.P. Bastian

The purpose of the study was to devise an instrument, labelled the Fine Wine Instrument (FWI), to measure the fine wine behaviour of respondents and then use that base to…

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1354

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to devise an instrument, labelled the Fine Wine Instrument (FWI), to measure the fine wine behaviour of respondents and then use that base to segment the consumer sample. The behaviour of those respondents who scored highly on the FWI was examined in detail.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey collected quantitative information from a convenience sample of Australian wine consumers (n = 1,017). Using the FWI as the segmentation base, cluster analysis identified three segments of consumers, denoted “Wine Enthusiasts”, “Aspirants” and “No Frills” wine drinkers, and their respective wine-related behaviours were examined.

Findings

The Wine Enthusiasts’ segment consumed more wine, spent more money on wine and were more knowledgeable about wine than the other two segments. The demographics of the Wine Enthusiasts’ segment indicated that the members were not consistent with the conventional view of wine connoisseurs, as many were under the age of 35. Their lifetime value to the wine industry was highlighted along with potential targeting strategies. Some structural elements of the Australian domestic wine market were also noted.

Practical implications

A segmentation base of a wine market is presented, which the authors argue provides a more sophisticated analysis than other commonly used segmentation bases.

Originality/value

This study was the first to segment the Australian market using the recently developed FWI. The study provides the latest information on this market and deeper consumer insights that may permit better business-to-consumer engagement.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

John Hall

Spawton (1991) discusses consumer expectations and risk‐reduction strategies in the purchase of wines. Spawton (1991) refers to a four‐segment model of the market. These…

Abstract

Spawton (1991) discusses consumer expectations and risk‐reduction strategies in the purchase of wines. Spawton (1991) refers to a four‐segment model of the market. These segments include Connoisseurs, Aspirational Drinkers, Beverage Wine Consumers and New Wine Drinkers. These segments were developed from the results of an exploratory qualitative study conducted by McKinna (1987). This study aims to empirically test and confirm the segments that the wine industry has taken for granted. There are four hypotheses relating to the confirmation of Spawton's (1991) segments.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Hong Bo Liu, Breda McCarthy, Tingzhen Chen, Shu Guo and Xuguang Song

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how the Chinese wine market can be meaningfully segmented and to explore marketing implications for the Australian wine sector.

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5794

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the Chinese wine market can be meaningfully segmented and to explore marketing implications for the Australian wine sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is descriptive in nature, using an online survey to collect quantitative data on wine consumer behaviour. A total of 407 responses were obtained. Data analysis included descriptive analysis (frequency distributions) and cluster analysis.

Findings

The research identifies three clusters of wine consumers: “the extrinsic attribute-seeking customers”, “the intrinsic attribute-seeking customers” and “the alcohol level attribute-seeking customers”. These groups of consumers were categorised using a behavioural (benefit) segmentation base.

Research limitations/implications

The use of an internet survey and convenience sample limits generalisation of the findings. The adoption of a behavioural basis in conducting the segmentation is a limitation. The use of more complex segmentation bases, such as psychographics, may yield a richer understanding of the Chinese wine consumer in future studies.

Practical implications

The customer profiles provide Australian wine marketers with an insight into Chinese wine consumer behaviour. Brand positioning can be improved by ensuring that the brand emphasises certain product attributes which the segments value when choosing wine.

Originality/value

Little previous research on market segmentation has been conducted in mainland China. For Australian wine marketers, this study provides a baseline study into market segmentation and may assist with targeting and brand positioning decisions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000