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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Mary Anne Kennan, Mary Carroll and Kim M. Thompson

Purpose – This chapter provides a historical overview of libraries and library and information science/studies (LIS) education in Australia, charting the changing nature…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter provides a historical overview of libraries and library and information science/studies (LIS) education in Australia, charting the changing nature of the LIS academy and the profession. The chapter then examines the knowledge, skills, and qualifications required for current and emerging LIS professionals, discussing how we embrace new knowledge and analyzing whether there are aspects of current LIS education that we need to hold on to or let go of in order to re-envision LIS education in the future.

Design/Methodology/Approach – A brief historical analysis of Australian librarianship, library associations, and LIS education, dating from European colonization in 1788 to the present, 2017, sets the context and informs the discussion.

Findings – This chapter demonstrates how social, political, technological, and educational forces have influenced libraries, librarianship, and LIS education. Within this context, we propose ways forward, such as partnering with broader information communities, adopting emerging specialties, building closer relationships between academia and practice, and considering “letting go” of some of the old as we add the new.

Originality/Value – By providing an original historical overview of librarianship in Australia with a particular focus on LIS education and how the goals and focus of both librarianship and LIS education have evolved over the centuries, this chapter contributes to an informed discussion designed to assist in re-envisioning the information professions and disciplines in the future.

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Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Book part
Publication date: 9 January 2012

Concepción S. Wilson, Mary Anne Kennan, Sebastian K. Boell and Patricia Willard

The central place that education has in the strength and well-being of any profession is widely accepted. Australia presents an interesting case study of a country where…

Abstract

The central place that education has in the strength and well-being of any profession is widely accepted. Australia presents an interesting case study of a country where Library and Information Studies (LIS) education moved from being conducted by practitioners under the guidance of the professional association to being provided in institutions of higher education in 1959. The 50 years (1959–2008) saw substantial changes in Australian LIS education with a rapid proliferation of schools which was later followed by closures, mergers and changes of focus. This chapter charts LIS education during this period focusing on organizational and structural aspects of the placement of LIS education in tertiary institutions, on the academization of LIS educators who had in the early days mainly been drawn from practice, and on the development of LIS educators as academic researchers and authors as represented by their productivity and visibility in national and international databases. In addition to giving an account of these areas of LIS education over the 50 years, the chapter seeks to offer explanations for what has occurred and some views of strategies which may assist the development of LIS education in Australia and in other countries which possess similar characteristics.

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Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Asia-Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-470-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Jane Simon

Discusses the findings from a recent Australian study on the statusof women in libraries. Poses the question of whether a“double‐glazed” ceiling exists for women in…

Abstract

Discusses the findings from a recent Australian study on the status of women in libraries. Poses the question of whether a “double‐glazed” ceiling exists for women in librarianship despite their movement since the late 1980s into library management positions and legislative initiatives. Utilizes both survey data and information obtained from follow‐up interviews with female librarians. Also questions the usefulness of the metaphor, the “glass ceiling”, as an explanation for gender inequality.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Maxine Rochester and Fay Nicholson

Five challenges for leadership and management skills were identified by the Karpin Report, “Enterprising Nation”. These were: to develop a positive enterprise culture; to…

Abstract

Five challenges for leadership and management skills were identified by the Karpin Report, “Enterprising Nation”. These were: to develop a positive enterprise culture; to upgrade the capabilities of the vocational training and education sector, capitalising on the talents of diversity, best practice management development and achievement of best practice. Each challenge is related to Australian librarianship in the 1990s and relevant issues for management education and professional development discussed.

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Library Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1980

James G Ollé, James Tank, George Jefferson, David Liddle, David Reid and Colin Steele

IF YOU should ever have a mind to experience the flavour of life in the British public library service during the early decades of this century, you could not do better…

Abstract

IF YOU should ever have a mind to experience the flavour of life in the British public library service during the early decades of this century, you could not do better than turn to the contemporary files of the periodicals of librarianship. Apart from its beastlier aspects, to which only a George Orwell could have done justice, the library journals reflected pretty well the public library world as it used to be: impoverished and imperfect, but optimistic and resilient.

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New Library World, vol. 81 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 25 February 2011

Mary Carroll

The background and context of Australian Library and Information Services (LIS) education and the role LIS education plays in constructing the Australian workplace are…

Abstract

The background and context of Australian Library and Information Services (LIS) education and the role LIS education plays in constructing the Australian workplace are explored in this chapter. It provides an analysis of the broader historical, social and educational imperatives which have shaped Australian LIS education. It also examines the pedagogical, structural and epistemological construct surrounding the development of education for LIS in that country. Specific questions are raised about divisions in LIS education and training which lay the framework for further research and discussion. The historical context for LIS education is covered and insights into the nature and background of the broader educational frameworks which have influenced it are provided.

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-755-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Toby Burrows

One of Australia's unique achievements in the world of librarianship is the Australian Bibliographic Network, generally known as ABN. It performs several different roles…

Abstract

One of Australia's unique achievements in the world of librarianship is the Australian Bibliographic Network, generally known as ABN. It performs several different roles: it acts as a source of bibliographic records, a national bibliographic database, and an inter‐library loan system. Since its foundation, in 1981, it has grown to link all states and territories, and counts nearly 1,200 libraries as members, though there are still several major institutions which have not joined. The ABN database consists of 8.7 million bibliographic records, from five different countries, as well as more than 15 million holdings statements for Australian libraries. In its size and truly national scope, ABN is probably unique in the world.

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New Library World, vol. 93 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Michael Robinson

The purpose of this paper is to offer a number of reflections based on the personal experience of working as a librarian in Vietnam.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a number of reflections based on the personal experience of working as a librarian in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is subjective and is based on the author's observations and conclusions as a project consultant to several philanthropic projects in Vietnam.

Findings

The paper briefly describes these library projects and then discusses some of the more significant professional and personal challenges and rewards they involved.

Practical implications

The paper provides some practical guidance on approaches to project management across cultures and on issues specific to library project management and consulting in Vietnam.

Originality/value

The paper is both a contribution to the small body of literature on the impact of philanthropic assistance and projects on libraries in Vietnam, as well as a personal narrative on the experience of working as a professional librarian in another culture.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Mary Carroll and Sue Reynolds

To most minds libraries exist at the periphery of debates over education and educational reform. However, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how, in 1910, the…

Abstract

Purpose

To most minds libraries exist at the periphery of debates over education and educational reform. However, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how, in 1910, the Melbourne Public Library (now the State Library of Victoria) was central, rather than peripheral, to a conflict which focussed on the role of the library in education and how the library and its collection could best be organised to meet this purpose. It will be argued that libraries and the way they are organised act as indices of the dominant views about education and can be seen as social and educational artefacts. As artefacts they encapsulate community beliefs about how learning could best occur at a given time and what knowledge was esteemed, made available and to whom.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate this point of view and illuminate the broader issues, this paper will use a particular set of events and a particular group of protagonists in Australian history as a case study.

Findings

This case study illuminates conflicting ideas about the place of libraries and the organisation of their collections in early twentieth‐century society and demonstrates how these ideas continued to have an impact on the place of libraries in educational reform agendas in Australia in the following decades.

Social implications

The argument reported as “the disaffection in the library” was both philosophical and practical and illuminated ongoing debates surrounding the place of the library in education. The outcome influenced the shape and place of libraries in Australia and demonstrates broader concerns at work in Federation Australia.

Originality/value

The paper casts a new light on the relationship between libraries and education and the place of libraries in the educational process. The network of influence in Federation Australia and the impact of this on the development of institutions and professions in Australia is also examined.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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