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Article

Simone Pettigrew

While the wine market is significant in Australia, very little has been done in the way of consumer research to investigate Australians' attitudes towards the product…

Abstract

While the wine market is significant in Australia, very little has been done in the way of consumer research to investigate Australians' attitudes towards the product. This study explored the physical and social contexts that are considered appropriate for wine consumption in Australia. Interviews were conducted with 82 adults, adolescents, and children across three Australian states. The findings indicate that the apparent preference of females for wine over other forms of alcohol is contrived by the social environment in which Australians live and consume, as is the tendency for many men to avoid wine consumption in particular informal contexts. Wine marketers need to be aware of the extent to which different segments of the population adhere to the social norms surrounding wine consumption in order to select appropriate ways to attempt to integrate wine more fully into a wider range of consumption contexts.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Book part

Catherine Hoad

This chapter serves as the introduction to the edited collection, calling into focus the diverse ways in which ‘Australia’ is asserted in the spaces, scenes and practices…

Abstract

This chapter serves as the introduction to the edited collection, calling into focus the diverse ways in which ‘Australia’ is asserted in the spaces, scenes and practices of Australian heavy metal. This chapter responds to earlier quandaries in the sparse research on Australian metal which question if there is anything definitively ‘Australian’ about the characteristics, themes and narratives demonstrated within Australian heavy metal scenes. In response to this challenge, the author uses this chapter to establish critical foundations for addressing how Australianness has been represented ‘Downunderground’ (Phillipov, 2008, p. 215) – historically, musically and geographically, as work in this collection affirms. This introduction foregrounds the concerns of the edited collection at large, which addresses how national identity has been imagined and constructed in ways which can at once celebrate problematic patriarchal nationalist symbolism, yet also call into focus the resistant and subversive ways in which metal scenes have deconstructed, critiqued and renegotiated the parameters of what it means to be ‘Australian’. This chapter asserts that any interrogation of the ‘Australianness’ of Australian metal must problematise the notion of a singularly ‘Australian’ identity in the first instance. Here the author argues that ‘Australian metal’ as a consolidated signifier must be problematised to instead come to an understanding of the multisited ways in which ‘Australianness’ is experienced within scenes. In doing so the author establishes the critical trajectories for the edited collection at large – to track the genealogies of Australian metal as a component in a wider global scene, and consider the plurality of its contemporary manifestations.

Details

Australian Metal Music: Identities, Scenes, and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-167-4

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Book part

Barry Judd and Chris Hallinan

Purpose – We investigated recent efforts of the Australian Football League (AFL) to reintroduce the sport of Australian Football to post-Apartheid South…

Abstract

Purpose – We investigated recent efforts of the Australian Football League (AFL) to reintroduce the sport of Australian Football to post-Apartheid South Africa. The chapter adopts a critical approach exploring the difference between the rhetoric of reconciliation and its use as a commercial marketing tool and other agendas that may be at play in international expansion.

Design/methodology/approach – The discussion and research findings outlined in this chapter are based on extensive tape-recorded interviews with Anglo-Australian advocates, African converts and Indigenous Australian critics of the claim to reconciliation as well as field notes collected during the time of visits to Johannesburg and Cape Town, South Africa and Alice Springs, Australia.

Findings – Key themes to emerge from the interviews are presented, cohering around issues of identity, as well as personal and community empowerment through sport, together with the claimed uniqueness of Australian Football to achieve reconciliation in Australia and international contexts such as South Africa.

Research limitations/implications – The limitations of using an ethnographic approach are indicated. This research draws on the qualitative and self-reflective approaches that are characteristic of contemporary indigenous studies where the emphasis is on attempts to allow indigenous people and other marginal voices to speak for themselves.

Originality/value – The chapter provides the first scholarly engagement with the expansion of Australian Football in the new South Africa in the context of the politics of indigenous reconciliation.

Details

Native Games: Indigenous Peoples and Sports in the Post-Colonial World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-592-0

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Article

Luisa Lombardi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the disempowering and/or empowering role of accounting in the context of Indigenous Australians.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the disempowering and/or empowering role of accounting in the context of Indigenous Australians.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 31 interviewees participated in this study, which included 18 self-identified Indigenous Australians and 13 non-Indigenous Australians. A qualitative research methodology, and in particular an oral history method, was chosen because of its ability to support a deeper and richer form of inquiry. Bourdieu’s concepts provide the framework for mobilizing and analyzing the findings of this study.

Findings

The damaging role of accounting in the context of Indigenous peoples has largely stemmed from non-Indigenous peoples providing accounting services for Indigenous peoples. The evidence and analysis provided by this study postulates a constructive way forward of accounting’s role in contributing to the empowerment of Indigenous Australians.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include being a non-Indigenous researcher conducting research in an Indigenous context, which may have prevented some interviewees from feeling comfortable to openly share their experiences and insights.

Practical implications

As this study’s findings have supported the theory that accounting skills can be used in an empowering way when used “by” Indigenous peoples, Indigenous Australians should be actively supported by the accounting bodies to gain the qualifications needed for membership of the accounting profession.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the expanding accounting literature that locates the role of accounting in the context of Indigenous peoples by proposing accounting as a tool of empowerment.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article

Ataus Samad, Michael Muchiri and Sehrish Shahid

This article aims to understand the underlying mechanisms through which transformational leadership influences employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to understand the underlying mechanisms through which transformational leadership influences employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions. Specifically, the study explores the mediation role of employee well-being on the relationships between leadership and both employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a quantitative research method, data were collected from 280 academics and professional staff from an Australian regional university. The Mplus software was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results showed that transformational leadership had significant positive impact on employee well-being and job satisfaction while it alleviated employee turnover intentions. Furthermore, employee well-being mediated the effect of transformational leadership on employee job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The research was cross-sectional, and data were collected from a convenient sample and therefore minimises our ability to generalise the findings to other contexts.

Practical implications

Effective leadership, employee well-being, job satisfaction and employee turnover are of strategic importance in the higher education sector in Australia and internationally. These findings will therefore provide a basis for university policy makers to craft relevant policies that promote effective leader behaviours and enhance employee well-being as they facilitate employee job satisfaction and minimise turnover intentions among higher education sector employees (i.e. academics and professional staff).

Originality/value

Our study provides a unique contribution to knowledge as it explains the mediation effect of employee well-being on the relation between transformational leadership a, job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Merryl Whyte and Suzanne Zyngier

– The purpose of this paper is to describe outcomes from a trial of the Danish Intellectual Capital Statement (ICS) within the Australian public sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe outcomes from a trial of the Danish Intellectual Capital Statement (ICS) within the Australian public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Two work teams within the Department of Primary Industries, Farm Services Victoria (FSV) participated in the trial over a six-month period. Data were collected and triangulated from structured focus groups, researcher guided workshops and individual project record journals kept by participants and observers.

Findings

This trial has tested and confirmed existing European Intellectual Capital Management (ICM) theory in a new context, confirmed the strategic management and communication utility of the Danish ICS. It also revealed the utility of this method: to assist the organisation articulate its knowledge-related needs; in developing knowledge management (KM) strategy, in planning and reviewing KM initiatives, in developing clarity and shared context and in navigating change.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on a single in-depth case study and concurrent organisational restructuring impacted on team focus.

Practical implications

The strategic management and communication utility of the Danish ICS was confirmed. The paper demonstrates new insights for practitioners using this ICM method as a useful tool to assist an organisation to articulate KM needs.

Originality/value

The primary research gap in the ICM field is examination of the practical application of methods in a real-life context (particularly outside Europe). This work has tested and confirmed existing theory in a new and different context – the Australian public sector.

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Article

Andrew John Sense, Jill Owen and Chivonne Watt

The purpose of this paper is to present and analyse the context, the current issues and the opportunities for project management (PM) research within Australia. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and analyse the context, the current issues and the opportunities for project management (PM) research within Australia. The paper contributes to researcher and industry practitioner knowledge and debates on supporting and promoting the development of national PM research agendas.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a research paper which draws on and interprets empirical data generated from a comprehensive national survey of Australian PM researchers.

Findings

The paper first profiles the current landscape of Australian PM research. Thereafter, it explores the future opportunities/risks for PM research in this country, as perceived by the researcher community.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to the collection of data from PM researchers across Australia (80 percent response rate to the survey tool). Clearly, this study was confined to one country and to one category of respondent.

Practical implications

This paper will make contributions to national and international debates and analysis on current research trajectories and future opportunities in the PM field and thereby also aid comparative knowledge development within the researcher community.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first comprehensive national PM researcher study undertaken in Australia. It provides a compelling national insight into the current state of PM research as perceived by PM researchers and illustrates issues concerning their research contexts, their links to industry partners and perceptions of industry and industry representative body engagement in PM research activity.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article

Teagan Altschwager, Jodie Conduit, Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva and Steve Goodman

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term branded marketing events (BMEs), and examine the role of its experiential components as a strategic tool for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term branded marketing events (BMEs), and examine the role of its experiential components as a strategic tool for the facilitation of customer brand engagement. This study examines five experiential components of BMEs at events held in Australia and France to determine their respective impact on customer brand engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were distributed to attendees of ten events by six wine brands in South Australia, and six events in five sub-regions of Bordeaux.

Findings

Findings suggest that BMEs influence customers’ brand engagement and brand purchase intention in both Australia and France. However, the experiential components within the events had differing effects. Australian customers were influenced by cognitive, sensorial, and relational experiences and their increased customer brand engagement strongly influenced brand purchase intention. French customers, however, required pragmatic event experiences to build brand engagement.

Originality/value

Recognizing their mutual experiential and interactive foundations, this study integrates the research domains of marketing events, customer experiences and customer brand engagement, and contributes to the strategic understanding of how branded event experiences facilitate customer brand engagement.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article

Tim Lindgren, Marta Sinclair and Dale Miller

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Australian fashion designers perceive the impact and opportunities offered by the Chinese textile and clothing industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Australian fashion designers perceive the impact and opportunities offered by the Chinese textile and clothing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design used personally administered, semi‐structured interviews. A purposeful sample used interviewees drawn from proactive fashion business owners. The sample covered four clothing categories. Thematic data analysis was used, and data integrity was assured, using well‐recognised techniques including triangulation and constant comparison.

Findings

The Queensland fashion designers are experiencing significant impacts from the current economic and manufacturing situations and the challenges presented by developments in China. They respond to their operational concerns, but do not deal strategically with contemporary challenges. They are unaware of opportunities that the Chinese textile and clothing industry offers, struggling with a global perspective. Although they are aware of issues with intellectual property, they have little experience in protecting their intangible assets.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could link the proposed scenario building with interviews, to develop an even more robust research design. Extensions to other Asia Pacific countries could reveal common issues and any unique perspectives.

Practical implications

Application of the proposed model and the pursuit of the scenarios for future development could assist fashion designers in the formation of a sense of community. A return to craftsmanship could nurture the local fashion design community, and create offshore links and relationships, facilitated by technology.

Originality/value

The empirical study proposes a new model, suggesting approaches and solutions, not previously considered in the context of fashion designers and their opportunities in doing business with China.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Helen Irvine and Christine Ryan

In the context of the Australian Government’s attempts to impose budget austerity measures on publicly funded universities in its higher education sector, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of the Australian Government’s attempts to impose budget austerity measures on publicly funded universities in its higher education sector, the purpose of this paper is to assess the sector’s financial health.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi-dimensional study is based on seven years of government financial data from all 39 publicly funded Australian universities, supplemented by information from universities’ annual reports. Using a financial health model that reflects vulnerability, viability and resilience, the authors examine sector data using a suite of metrics. The authors analyse differences between those universities in the Top 10 and Bottom 10 by revenue, as a window into the financial health of the sector at large.

Findings

While mostly financially viable, the sector shows signs of financial vulnerability, particularly in the areas of expense control and financial sustainability. Possibly in response to an uncertain funding environment, universities are managing long-term liquidity by growing reserves. Debt represents largely untapped potential for universities, while differences between the Top 10 and Bottom 10 universities were most evident in the area of revenue diversity, a strong predictor of financial viability.

Research limitations/implications

Focussing on a specific set of financial metrics limits the scope of the study, but highlights further research possibilities. These include more detailed statistical analysis of data, financial case studies of individual universities and the implications of revenue diversification on academic standards.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to higher education literature, providing empirical evidence of universities’ finances. It highlights the importance of universities’ financial resilience in an uncertain funding environment.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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