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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Gayle Avery, André Everett, Anne Finkelde and Kolleen Wallace

Having shaken off the formal mantles of their British forebears, Australians and New Zealanders are eagerly embracing the latest management development (MD) approaches…

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Abstract

Having shaken off the formal mantles of their British forebears, Australians and New Zealanders are eagerly embracing the latest management development (MD) approaches, adopting and adapting North American and European methods. Recent government reports highlight the need for both basic and advanced MD, increasing the receptivity of the business community for fresh, imported MD programs. Successful localisation of overseas offerings depends on an awareness of subtle differences between the two countries as well as between them and other English‐speaking regions. In addition to anecdotal advice for the flying MD consultant, we provide an environmental scan, focusing on cultural distinctions and recent economic developments affecting demand for, and practices in, MD in Australia and New Zealand. Our goal is to maximise your success in prospecting, designing, and conducting MD programs in our countries.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2011

Terry Evans, Ian Brailsford and Peter Macauley

The purpose of this paper is to present data and discussion on history researcher development and research capacities in Australia and New Zealand, as evidenced in…

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872

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present data and discussion on history researcher development and research capacities in Australia and New Zealand, as evidenced in analysis of history PhD theses' topics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on two independent studies of history PhD thesis topics, using a standard discipline coding system.

Findings

The paper shows some marked differences in the Australian and New Zealand volumes and distributions of history PhDs, especially for PhDs conducted on non‐local/national topics. These differences reflect national researcher development, research capacities and interests, in particular local, national and international histories, and have implications for the globalisation of scholarship.

Research limitations/implications

Thesis topics are used as a proxy for the graduate's research capacity within that topic. However, as PhD examiners have attested to the significance and originality of the thesis, this is taken as robust. The longitudinal nature of the research suggests that subsequent years' data and analysis would provide rich information on changes to history research capacity. Other comparative (i.e. international) studies would provide interesting analyses of history research capacity.

Practical implications

There are practical implications for history departments in universities, history associations, and government (PhD policy, and history researcher development and research capacity in areas such as foreign affairs).

Social implications

There are social implications for local and community history in the knowledge produced in the theses, and in the development of local research capacity.

Originality/value

The work in this paper is the first to collate and analyse such thesis data either in Australia or New Zealand. The comparative analyses of the two datasets are also original.

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2010

Kay Whitehead and Kay Morris Matthews

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At…

Abstract

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At the beginning of this period the British Empire was expanding and New Zealand and South Australia had much in common. They were white settler societies, that is ‘forms of colonial society which had displaced indigenous peoples from their land’. We have organised the article chronologically so the first section commences with Catherine’s birth in England and early life in South Australia, where she mostly inhabited the world of the young ladies school, a transnational phenomenon. The next section investigates her career in New Zealand from 1878 where she led the Mount Cook Infant’s School in Wellington and became one of the colony’s first renowned women principals. We turn to Dorothy Dolling in the third section, describing her childhood and work as a university student and tutor in New Zealand and England. The final section of our article focuses on the ways in which both women have been represented in the national memories of Australia and New Zealand. In so doing, we show that understandings about nationhood are also transnational, and that writing about Francis and Dolling reflects the shifting relationships between the three countries in the twentieth century.

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History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

David Ong, David Reid and Natasha Simons

This article seeks to provide an update of two papers presented to the VDX Users Group of Australia and New Zealand during 2006. It aims to explore the issues associated…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to provide an update of two papers presented to the VDX Users Group of Australia and New Zealand during 2006. It aims to explore the issues associated with the implementation of Trans Tasman Interlending and its subsequent success, and is written primarily from a technical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part describes the issues addressed, processes used and resolutions adopted in the period leading up to the go‐live of Trans Tasman Interlending. The second part provides a review of the first six months of operation.

Findings

Trans Tasman Interlending has produced interesting results and is clearly more significant for interlending in New Zealand than it is Australia. This article looks at a variety of result areas and delves into the issues the linked service has highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

While both countries have based their analysis on readily available report data, it is only in the Australian context that a formalised user survey was used. New Zealand reporting relies more on anecdotal evidence.

Practical implications

In highlighting the issues involved in linking two utilities this article potentially provides a checklist for others to follow and a yardstick against which to measure success.

Originality/value

Trans Tasman Interlending is a first for the linking of two national interlending utilities.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Cameron Allan, Peter Brosnan and Pat Walsh

In the post‐Second World War period, working and social life has been organised around the concept of a standard day and week with premium payments for work undertaken…

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Abstract

In the post‐Second World War period, working and social life has been organised around the concept of a standard day and week with premium payments for work undertaken during unsocial hours. In recent years, this standard model for organising working‐time has been placed under pressure from a range of supply‐ and demand‐side factors. Greater female and student participation in the labour force has led to a fragmentation of working‐time preferences on the supply side. Employers, on the demand side, have also sought to dismember the standard working‐time model to eliminate premium payments for unsocial work and to achieve greater control and flexibility in the allocation of non‐standard working hours. Employer demand for this type of labour flexibility has been one of the central rationales for the decentralisation of industrial relations systems in Australia and New Zealand. This paper seeks to assess whether employers in the more deregulated New Zealand system have instigated a vastly different non‐standard working‐time regime from their Australian counterparts. The article concludes that there are only minor differences in the distribution of non‐standard working hours in Australia and New Zealand. This finding challenges the notion that the arbitration system is a major impediment to the organisation of working‐time. Rather, it appears that production and operational demands are the central imperative in the structuring of working‐time within firms.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2009

Helen Wildy, Simon Clarke and Carol Cardno

Our chapter examines the ways national developments in Australia and New Zealand over the past two decades reflect distinctively antipodean understandings of educational…

Abstract

Our chapter examines the ways national developments in Australia and New Zealand over the past two decades reflect distinctively antipodean understandings of educational leadership and management. Our interest is twofold. We are concerned about the extent to which these understandings are reflected in strategies designed to enhance the quality of school leadership. We are also concerned about the extent to which these strategies represent progress towards achieving ‘sustainable’ school leadership. We define sustainable leadership in terms of both building leadership capacity within the organisation and embedding lasting organisational change (Fink & Brayman, 2006; Hargreaves & Fink, 2006; Spillane, 2006). The concept used here implies both models of distributed or shared leadership and leadership succession.

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Educational Leadership: Global Contexts and International Comparisons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-645-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2009

M. Dutta

Australia and New Zealand are two very special economies of the South Pacific. The settlers of these two economies came from Europe, mostly the UK. Indeed, both were…

Abstract

Australia and New Zealand are two very special economies of the South Pacific. The settlers of these two economies came from Europe, mostly the UK. Indeed, both were colonies of the British Empire and Her Majesty, the Queen of England, continues to be the constitutional head of Australia and New Zealand. The original peoples of the two economies acceded to the authority of the European settlers. Some went on to complete an English education and earned places of official rank and accommodation under the new regime. It was only recently, on February 23, 2008, at the initiative of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd of Australia, that the Australian Parliament resolved to offer an official apology to the indigenous peoples of the land for their past suffering.

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The Asian Economy and Asian Money
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-261-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

C. Michael Hall, Brock Cambourne, Niki Macionis and Gary Johnson

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly…

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Abstract

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly through the development of inter and intra industry networks. This paper provides a review of wine tourism, briefly discusses networks and their value, then analyses the development of wine tourism networks in Australia and New Zealand. The research indicates that although wine tourism network development is being actively encouraged, substantial difficulties exist because of the perception by many in the wine industry that they are not part of tourism. The paper concludes that while the development of new organisational structures to encourage wine tourism development are useful, they must be complimented by research on linkages, education of potential network members in order to close information gaps; and the development of network structures which maximise the overlap and linkages mat exists between the wine and tourism industries.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Abstract

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Handbook of Transport Strategy, Policy and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0804-4115-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

David Boles de Boer, Christina Enright and Lewis Evans

Shows that ISP final prices are lower, Internet usage is higher, and the number of ISPs per head of population is lower in New Zealand relative to Australia. Goes on to…

Abstract

Shows that ISP final prices are lower, Internet usage is higher, and the number of ISPs per head of population is lower in New Zealand relative to Australia. Goes on to argue that ISPs pose competitive threats for telecommunications companies and that New Zealand’s open competition regime, relative to Australia’s access regulations, has invited more efficient facilities competition.

Details

info, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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