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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2019

Audrey R. Taylor, Þórný Barðadóttir, Sarah Auffret, Annette Bombosch, Allison Lee Cusick, Edda Falk and Amanda Lynnes

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for using citizen science – defined as a data collection method through which non-professionals engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for using citizen science – defined as a data collection method through which non-professionals engage in contributing to authentic scientific inquiry – within the expedition cruise industry to contribute significantly to the collection of environmental data from hard-to-access Arctic areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review trends in Arctic expedition cruise tourism and current needs in Arctic research and monitoring, and clarify where the expedition cruise tourism industry could have the most impact by providing data to the scientific community. The authors also compare the regulatory context in the Antarctic to that in the Arctic and discuss how these differences could affect the widespread use of citizen science. At last, the authors describe some general principles for designing citizen science programs to be successful on board, and highlight several existing programs that are being recognized for their contributions to a greater scientific understanding of the Arctic.

Findings

The authors find that citizen science data from the expedition cruise industry are underutilized as a tool for monitoring Arctic change. Numerous examples illustrate how citizen science programs on-board expedition ships can successfully collect robust scientific data and contribute to enhancing the knowledge and stewardship capacity of cruise passengers. Inclusion of citizen science data from the expedition cruise industry should be considered a critical part of international Arctic observing networks and systems.

Social implications

Active participation in Arctic citizen science by tourists on expedition cruise ships has many potential benefits beyond the collection of high quality data, from increasing passengers’ knowledge and understanding of the Arctic while on board, to affecting their attitudes and behaviors after they return home.

Originality/value

The potential for tourism to contribute to Arctic observing systems has been discussed previously in the scientific literature; the authors narrow the focus to citizen science programs in the expedition cruise industry, and provide concrete examples, in the hope that this will streamline acceptance and implementation of these ideas by researchers and tourism practitioners.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

George C. Jackson, Jeffrey J. Stoltman and Audrey Taylor

Logisticians are trained to identify trade‐offs and to devisecompromising solutions which produce the lowest total costs. Forexample, the economic batch size is a…

Abstract

Logisticians are trained to identify trade‐offs and to devise compromising solutions which produce the lowest total costs. For example, the economic batch size is a compromise between setup costs and inventory carrying costs. Presents a problem‐analysis technique which helps the analyst to eliminate the problem so that no compromise is necessary. For example, instead of balancing inventory‐carrying costs and setup costs a solution which produces both lower setup costs and lower inventory‐carrying costs would be sought. Discusses a description of the techniques and several examples of its application to logistical problems.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2011

Audrey Taylor, Tamara Kowalczyk and Suzanne Klein

Spending constraints in state budgets have resulted in a need to evaluate the effects of alternative budgeting techniques. We study public school administrations, where…

Abstract

Spending constraints in state budgets have resulted in a need to evaluate the effects of alternative budgeting techniques. We study public school administrations, where improvements in budgetary processes could help align system goals with reduced levels of funding. A budgeting technique, called strategic budgeting (SB), emphasizing information symmetry and mutual monitoring, is investigated in a nonprofit setting by comparing it to a traditional budgeting (TB) method. The experiment finds that the effect of reduced spending previously discovered in a corporate setting are also evident in a not-for-profit setting. Results indicated an overall cost savings with SB of almost 25 percent. Public school administrators made spending decisions in a hypothetical three-year task and provided comments to justify their decisions. These comments along with anecdotal evidence from prior field research indicate that collaborative characteristics in a budget format may reduce unnecessary spending.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-817-6

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2006

Tamara Kowalczyk, Savya Rafai and Audrey Taylor

Prior research indicates that incorporating information symmetry into budgeting processes can reduce slack. This study investigates a new budgeting format, Strategic…

Abstract

Prior research indicates that incorporating information symmetry into budgeting processes can reduce slack. This study investigates a new budgeting format, Strategic Budgeting, which incorporates information symmetry via mutual monitoring through a “group budget buffer”, or pool, that supports funding non-budgeted expenditures. Department managers must seek approval from other managers to use pooled funds. We compare this budget format to a traditional format, which does not incorporate information symmetry, and investigate differences in spending decisions among managers. The results overwhelmingly show that groups using Strategic Budgeting spent less of a budget excess than those using Traditional Budgeting. The effect of the availability of unspent funds for a subsequent year's budget was also compared, with results indicating that this factor may potentially mitigate benefits gained from information symmetry over time. This study is the first to experimentally examine the effects of this new type of budgeting technique, as compared to Traditional Budgeting, on managerial budgeting behavior.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-447-8

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2006

Abstract

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-447-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2011

Abstract

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-817-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

K.G.B. BAKEWELL

The background to the Liverpool Polytechnic study of indexer reactions to the PRECIS indexing system and the methodology of the study are described. Some of the findings…

Abstract

The background to the Liverpool Polytechnic study of indexer reactions to the PRECIS indexing system and the methodology of the study are described. Some of the findings are discussed, special attention being given to points which some indexers regarded as advantages and others as disadvantages; the alleged labour‐intensiveness of PRECIS; the British Library and PRECIS; and the impact of PRECIS on the British library community. A thesaurus of terms used in the British Library PRECIS indexes is needed, and some consideration should be given to the possible simplification of PRECIS or modification to suit the needs of different users. Feedback from users of PRECIS indexes is required.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2019

Nazife Karamullaoglu and Ozlem Sandikci

This purpose of this paper is to explore how Western design, fashion and aesthetic styles influenced advertising practice in Turkey in the post-Second World War era…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to explore how Western design, fashion and aesthetic styles influenced advertising practice in Turkey in the post-Second World War era. Specifically, the authors focus on the key targets of the consumerist ideology of the period, women and discuss the representations of females in Turkish advertisements.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analysed using a combination of social semiotic and compositional analysis methods. Compositional analysis focused on the formal qualities and design elements of the ads; social semiotic analysis sought to uncover their meaning potentials in relation to social, cultural, political and economic dynamics of the period. The advertisements of a prominent Turkish pasta brand, Piyale, published in the local adaptation of the American Life magazine, between 1956 and 1966, constitute the data set.

Findings

The analysis reveals that Piyale followed the stylistic and thematic trends prevailing in American and European advertisements at the time and crafted ads that constructed and communicated a Westernized image of Turkish women and families. In line with the cultural currents of the 1950s and 1960s, the ads emphasize patriarchal gender roles and traditional family values and address the woman as a consumer whose priority is to please her husband and take good care of her children.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the advertising history in non-Western contexts and provides an understanding of the influence Western advertising conventions and fashion trends had on developing country markets. The findings indicate that Western-inspired representations and gender roles dominated advertisements of local brands during the post-war period.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2005

Andrew D. Bailey, Jr. and Audrey A. Gramling

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2020

Faith Bontrager and Kimball P. Marshall

This paper aims to provide a literature review of corporate wellness programs to develop recommendations for effective internal marketing of healthy behaviors in work environments.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a literature review of corporate wellness programs to develop recommendations for effective internal marketing of healthy behaviors in work environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of research literature published since 2000 addresses corporate wellness programs’ justifications and best program design practices.

Findings

Corporate and employee benefits documented in the literature are reviewed and best practices from published literature are identified to guide the design of wellness programs. These include framing clear messages, alignment of corporate culture and business strategy with wellness program goals, senior leader support, clear objectives and evaluation, incorporation of peer support and enjoyable activities, utilization of effective priming for healthy choices and consideration of legal and ethical incentives.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed, including how to frame messages for diverse work groups, how to carry out effective program assessments, what types of marketing appeals are effective, what wellness activities lead to healthy behavior change and how is increased employee productivity related to quality of life. Additional questions include how priming encourages healthy behaviors, what promotes healthy workplace cultures and what social marketing appeals promote healthy behaviors.

Practical implications

Senior managers can implement findings to create effective wellness programs benefiting employees and firms through improved employee health and productivity and reduced corporate health-care costs.

Social implications

Effective wellness programs reduce overall health-care costs for society and provide improved participants’ quality of work, personal and family life.

Originality/value

This research uniquely applies internal marketing, social marketing and marketing exchange concepts to best practices from the wellness literature and applies these to recommendations for effective corporate-based wellness programs.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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