Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Anne-Sophie Thelisson, Audrey Missonier and Gilles Guieu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a company reaches organizational ambidexterity during a merger process. Organizational ambidexterity refers to the proactive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a company reaches organizational ambidexterity during a merger process. Organizational ambidexterity refers to the proactive adaptations of an organization to simultaneously explore and exploit.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a longitudinal case study of a public-private merger of two listed French companies. The data were collected from participant observation, interviews and archival documentation over two years.

Findings

The balance between autonomy and control by the parent companies evolves during the post-merger integration. The findings reveal that there was no concordance between the oscillations between autonomy and control on the part of the parent companies and the new organization’s exploration/exploitation strategies. However, the progressive evolution of control and autonomy from the parent companies engendered organizational ambidexterity during the third phase integration.

Practical implications

The study adds insight into how organizations can develop ways to manage organizational ambidexterity dynamics by employing temporal mechanisms, referring to an organization’s shifting sequentially between exploration and exploitation. The case highlights how temporal switching between exploration and exploitation occurs to ultimately enable ambidexterity.

Originality/value

Although organizational ambidexterity is recognized as a key element for post-merger integration, how it is achieved over the course of the merger process has received little attention. The study highlights that in the case of public-private mergers, the parent companies influence exploration and/or exploitation strategies. The paper adds insights on whether exploration and exploitation can be differentiated over time and whether exploration and exploitation can be reconciled at the same time.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Anne-Sophie Thelisson, Audrey Missonier, Gilles Guieu and Lotte S. Luscher

This paper aims to examine post-merger integration (PMI) through the lens of paradox to determine how paradoxes contribute to successful integration. Although PMI has been…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine post-merger integration (PMI) through the lens of paradox to determine how paradoxes contribute to successful integration. Although PMI has been identified as crucial to understand merger success or failure, the literature on PMI drivers remains inconclusive.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of paradox and two key elements of PMI, strategic interdependency (SI) and organizational autonomy (OA), the authors describe the merger of two listed French companies using longitudinal data.

Findings

The authors identify how the paradox between OA and SI was triggered and fostered PMI success by leading to symbiotic integration. They also show that two capabilities were central in helping the paradox to evolve: preserving the specificities of the organizations and pooling their respective capabilities. These capabilities result from basic decisions and actions during the integration implementation, such as highlighting the expertise of the target firm, refocusing the core activity while valorizing each company’s expertise, clarifying the identity of the new organization on the market and enhancing joint piloting and transferring both general management capacity and functional abilities during the reorganization period.

Practical implications

The authors offer several useful insights for managers trying to manage paradoxical tension throughout the merger process. This study encourages managers to embrace inconsistencies as they make decisions and to shift to dynamic decision-making as a way to adapt to complex contexts.

Originality/value

This study adopts a global and inclusive approach to focus on OA and SI and flesh out a picture of the integration process. It proposes a dynamic process model to conceptualize the stage-wise nature of the PMI process by highlighting the interrelations between OA and SI dynamics.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Olivier Meier, Audrey Missonier and Richard Soparnot

This paper aims to answer two questions: firstly, how does the mode of corporate governance evolve following a merger between two specific companies looking for a joint

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to answer two questions: firstly, how does the mode of corporate governance evolve following a merger between two specific companies looking for a joint innovation policy? Secondly, what are the factors that guide decision makers towards choosing one governance model over another?

Design/methodology/approach

In order to answer these questions, this study focuses on two unlisted SMEs within the information and communication technology (ICT) sector, where joint innovation plays a key role. The authors studied the corporate governance decisions made during a strategic alliance between a small enterprise (called eStat) and a medium‐sized enterprise (called Médiamétrie), formed with a view to building a strategic partnership based on technological innovation. The method chosen to carry out this research involved a single case study based on passive observation (153 days of observation), participant observation, the conducting of 70 semi‐structured interviews and the analysis of internal documents such as the memorandum of understanding.

Findings

From a critical reading of the “standard” (disciplinary/shareholder, relating to process profitability issues in particular) and the “strategic” (the importance of human capital, relating to innovation issues in particular) approaches, the authors demonstrate how the managers of the newly‐created company (Médiamétrie‐eStat) gradually opted for a renewed, resource‐based corporate governance model.

Originality/value

Contrary to what underlies existing literature addressing corporate governance, this paper shows the need to consider the dynamics involved in the adoption of the corporate governance model when a merger deals with strategic innovation issues.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Katherine Gundolf, Olivier Meier and Audrey Missonier

The purpose of this research paper is to show to what extent psychological, cultural and behavioural factors can influence on the succession process in the particular case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to show to what extent psychological, cultural and behavioural factors can influence on the succession process in the particular case of family‐run businesses?

Design/methodology/approach

Data on 12 directors of family‐run SME were grouped together on the basis of questions derived from the research question. To do this, the authors operated using a principle guided by cross referencing responses, that is, finding the incidence of elements that make it possible to justify substantively the existence of the category and the common existence of these elements within the cases studied.

Findings

The thematic analysis performed made it possible to highlight five main motives for cultural and psychological resistance in former directors: the loss of power and influence, the risk of deconstruction, the loss of professional and social legitimacy, the loss of references and meaning, and the refusal of old age and death.

Originality/value

The results show that transferors search for connections in the aim of identifying common points of anchor, affinities on to which they can project themselves as an element of continuity or an extension of their personality. The paper can in particular note the importance given to cultural proximity and to previous professional relations with the transferor. These criteria, unlike personal factors, are of the interpersonal type and thus deeply imprinted on the transferor's most intimate desires and motivations, including the main desire, which is to search for all that can make possible an extension of himself within his company and thus ensure the permanence of his values and his time at the organisation.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Katherine Gundolf, Olivier Meier and Audrey Missonier

This article aims to explore how and why the creation of technological innovation during a merger can end in failure. The objective is to propose new analytical elements…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore how and why the creation of technological innovation during a merger can end in failure. The objective is to propose new analytical elements to improve the formulation and execution of the integration process between an SME (small and medium enterprise) and a large enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a theoretical framework based on the main research results from several fields, including technology transfer, innovation dissemination, and management. This case study then focuses on a merger in the IT sector in real time.

Findings

This study allowed the authors to test theoretical elements, especially the choice of the integration method, which may favour the creation of technological innovation during the integration period. The authors present new reasons for the failure of co‐created innovation between an SME and a large enterprise in the IT sector. This case study allowed them to test theoretical elements such as the choice of an integration method which could favour the creation of technological innovation during the integration period while enriching scientific knowledge by proposing a dynamic approach to the integration process.

Originality/value

Before managers can envisage symbiosis between two merging firms, they first need to go through a period of exploration, which may entail costly mistakes. Yet this exploration period may be necessary to enable them to discover the limitations of a strictly rational approach to the integration process and to broaden their normal frame of reference. For this in‐depth study, the authors benefited from free access to a substantial amount of information that is generally unavailable for scientific research, which greatly contributed to their work. The authors' theoretical framework is not exhaustive, but they tried to incorporate the most significant research results.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5