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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Elvir Munirovich Akhmetshin, Rinat Rivkatovich Ibatullin, Almaz Rafisovich Gapsalamov, Vladimir Lvovich Vasilev and Sergey Yurevich Bakhvalov

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the audiovisual teaching aids are applied in the modern educational environment and to assess their application efficiency in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the audiovisual teaching aids are applied in the modern educational environment and to assess their application efficiency in the context of the secondary-level vocational education establishments.

Design/methodology/approach

A pedagogical experiment was conducted to confirm this hypothesis. At the preparatory stage, the authors have analyzed the teaching and learning process, as well as students learning at the secondary-level vocational education establishment. Statistical sample was 300 people.

Findings

Based on the research results, main mistakes made while applying the audiovisual teaching aids were identified, formulated and investigated. These mistakes were related to the insufficient methodological preparation. As these mistakes were eliminated, student achievements and learning skills have increased by 15–20 percent (experiment data). The average marks, obtained by students before and after eliminating the methodological mistakes, were taken in points (from 2 to 5) as achievement and learning skill criteria. Research conclusion is that audiovisual aids application quality can be improved only through the research on students’ educational and creative potential, their perception of various learning materials, and their preferences in the information structure, composition, types and forms.

Originality/value

Applying audiovisual teaching aids in the learning process is a challenge. This paper is driven by the need of new unique methods for applying audiovisual aids related to identifying the optimal temporal lesson structure, as well as the composition and the amount of auxiliary teaching materials, interactive communication level and ways to stimulate the emotional and creative activity of students.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

HELEN P. HARRISON

In addition to providing a review of the literature recently published in the librarianship of non‐book materials this survey aims to draw attention to the…

Abstract

In addition to providing a review of the literature recently published in the librarianship of non‐book materials this survey aims to draw attention to the characteristics, problems and achievements particular to the documentation and handling of non‐book materials (NBM) in many types of libraries. The materials are briefly described and considerations of selection, acquisition, organization, storage and in particular bibliographic control are dealt with in some detail. Other areas of concern to the librarian dealing with media resources, including the organization and training of staff, planning, equipment, exploitation and copyright, are also discussed. The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of NBM into libraries as additional or alternative sources of information. Librarians have been given an opportunity to rethink many basic principles and adapt existing practice to encompass the new materials. The survey reflects the achievements and some of the failures or problems remaining to be solved in this rapidly expanding area of library work.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

A. TREBBLE

An account of the present ‘state of the art’ of the librarianship of non‐book materials must begin with a note on terminology. ‘Audiovisual materials’, ‘non‐print items’…

Abstract

An account of the present ‘state of the art’ of the librarianship of non‐book materials must begin with a note on terminology. ‘Audiovisual materials’, ‘non‐print items’, and more imaginatively, ‘metabooks’, are some attempts at a collective description of film materials, sound recordings, and pictures of all kinds. The National Council for Educational Technology (NCET) favour ‘non‐book materials’, abbreviated to NBM. ‘One day, perhaps, the word “document” will be commonly accepted as connoting simply an embodiment of evidence, whether it be in print or pictures or whatever, and we shall take for granted that arrangements for the handling of documents should make provision as a matter of course for all media. In the meantime, the case must not be overlooked, and as an expression “non‐book material” is probably no more offensive and no less apt than its several rivals. “Non‐print document” is perhaps more accurate but is not yet in common use.’ I have adopted NBM.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1969

Peter Rigg

In Chicago the training instructor's day starts at 6.00 am. Five days a week he switches on his TV set before breakfast to Education Exchange a half‐hour programme…

Abstract

In Chicago the training instructor's day starts at 6.00 am. Five days a week he switches on his TV set before breakfast to Education Exchange a half‐hour programme demonstrating the use of multi‐media communications techniques in the classroom. The programme notes describe the series as a preparation for the instructor's ‘new role, in which he may not know all the answers, but he will be able to ask the right questions’.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 11 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Brad Eden

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

Marilyn L. Miller

The school library media center materials collection has evolved dramatically in the past sixty years from book‐centered collections of “the best reference books…

Abstract

The school library media center materials collection has evolved dramatically in the past sixty years from book‐centered collections of “the best reference books and…literature that has a natural appeal to young people” to “media collection(s) which represent the essential informational base of the instructional program.” The purposes of this discussion are: to trace the evolution of four specific aspects of collection development as found in national standards for school library media programs, 1918–1975; to review some of the research of the sixties and seventies that indicates some of the successes, problems, and trends involved in implementing professional guidelines on collection development; and to provide two case studies of organized evaluation and selection programs that serve as examples of an organized cooperative approach to collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Lucy A. Tedd

It is important that all those involved with education and training for online searching are aware of the teaching aids which have been produced and are used. This paper…

Abstract

It is important that all those involved with education and training for online searching are aware of the teaching aids which have been produced and are used. This paper aims to provide some of this information by describing primarily aids which have been developed and are used within the UK schools of librarianship and information science; however aids which are used by other organisations in various parts of the world have also been included.

Details

Online Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

Charles Citroen, Martin White and David Raitt

MIDS Search Aids. Part I: Vendors. Part II: Databases. Part III: Database index. Compiled by A. Labuschagne & S. Rossouw. South African Medical Research Council, 1986, 204

Abstract

MIDS Search Aids. Part I: Vendors. Part II: Databases. Part III: Database index. Compiled by A. Labuschagne & S. Rossouw. South African Medical Research Council, 1986, 204 pages, Free. This publication is a listing of search aids available for databases accessable via the major online hosts in the world. It is a print of the user aids holdings collected for the Medical Information Dissemination System, though the scope is wider than only medical databases.

Details

Online Review, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

Kathleen Weibel

There's no such thing as free materials, you scoff. And rightly so. Every item added to a library's collection costs money in staff time and storage costs, if not in…

Abstract

There's no such thing as free materials, you scoff. And rightly so. Every item added to a library's collection costs money in staff time and storage costs, if not in direct purchase price or postage. Free materials—like any others—are worth those costs if they enable you to better serve the library's clientele. If not, they are not worth the paper, celluloid or vinyl they're printed on.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Karen Markey Drabenstott and Diane Vizine‐Goetz

Search trees presented in this article control system responses and determine appropriate subject searching approaches to user queries. Users do not explicitly choose a…

Abstract

Search trees presented in this article control system responses and determine appropriate subject searching approaches to user queries. Users do not explicitly choose a particular approach. Rather, systems respond with an approach based on the extent to which queries match the catalog's controlled vocabulary and produce retrievals. The benefit of incorporating search trees into online bibliographic systems is the ability to place the responsibility of determining which approach produces the best results on the system.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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