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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Inna Shpilko

This article aggregates and reviews the disparate information needed to assess journal literature related to communication disorders both directly and peripherally. An…

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Abstract

This article aggregates and reviews the disparate information needed to assess journal literature related to communication disorders both directly and peripherally. An extensive analysis was performed using a list of 40 journals on communication disorders derived from a review of selected libraries’ journal collections, and then compared to entries in respected indexes and bibliographies covering this discipline. The result of this analysis is a list providing comprehensive information including scope and coverage, publisher information, indexing/abstracting data, and online availability for those 40 journals. In addition, a survey was conducted among communication disorders faculty in the City University of New York (CUNY) to investigate which professional journals are used regularly for current awareness and for clinical/research information. The information presented in this article should be of interest to faculty, students and practitioners in this area, as well as subject librarians responsible for collection development.

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Collection Building, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Michelle Veyvoda, Thomas J. Van Cleave and Laurette Olson

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged…

Abstract

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged teaching and learning can prepare students to become ethical healthcare practitioners. The authors infuse examples from their own courses throughout the chapter, mostly from the clinical fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, and occupational therapy. However, the chapter is applicable and generalizable to faculty from a wide scope of allied health training programs. The chapter introduces considerations for establishing campus–community partnerships in an ethical manner, as well as ways to foster student self-reflection and critical thinking through an ethical lens. Principles from the codes of ethics of various allied health professions are incorporated throughout the chapter along with examples of how each can be applied in community-based clinical experiences. Through a review of relevant literature, analysis of professional codes of ethics, case-based examples, and a step-by-step guide to course development, this chapter provides readers with a mechanism to ground their courses in professional ethics in a way that is relatable and relevant to students.

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Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Joseph Seabi, Jaishika Seedat, Katijah Khoza-Shangase and Lakeasha Sullivan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions of the challenges that they face and the factors that facilitate and impede teaching and learning within…

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1994

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions of the challenges that they face and the factors that facilitate and impede teaching and learning within the context of transformation at the University of the Witwatersrand. The paper also explores students’ perceptions of transformation directly and their ideas related to facilitating this process. The authors reflect briefly on colonialism and apartheid in South Africa and the state of higher education after 18 years of democracy.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, explorative, descriptive survey research design was employed to gain a deeper understanding of how students experience living, learning and teaching in higher education. A sample of 194 students with a mean age of 22.40 participated in the study.

Findings

The results revealed positive facilitative factors such as quality of teaching, social support, material resources and practical/clinical training; as well as negative hindering factors that included high workload, English as a medium of instruction and limited access to “other” resources which impacted the learning processes. There was a general feeling of dissatisfaction with the current status of the school regarding transformation.

Originality/value

This study makes novel contributions to the literature, especially related to the South African context. For instance, white students in professional degree programs reported that their inability to speak indigenous African languages hindered their provision of services to clients. This finding contrasts with previous literature that suggests that students who speak English as a first language have greater advantages than multilingual students whose mother tongue is not English.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Helen Miller and Reza Kiani

Prevalence of hearing impairment is quite common in people with learning disabilities (double jeopardy). However, this debilitating co‐morbidity remains largely undetected…

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230

Abstract

Prevalence of hearing impairment is quite common in people with learning disabilities (double jeopardy). However, this debilitating co‐morbidity remains largely undetected by carers and professionals due to presence of additional disabilities and complex clinical presentation in this population on the one hand, and lack of specialist hearing impairment service provision and difficulty in accessing generic audiology services on the other hand. This article aims to provide practical guidance on assessment and management of hearing impairment in people with learning disabilities by offering a narrative review of available literature on gaps in service delivery.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Alex Murdock and Brian Lamb

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Royal National Institute for the Deaf (RNID), a major UK third sector organisation, on public sector provision…

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301

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Royal National Institute for the Deaf (RNID), a major UK third sector organisation, on public sector provision. The case examined is that of auditory services (in effect the nature of assessment and provision of hearing aids in England).

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is that of a case study of the actions and approach of the RNID and their engagement with the public sector, in particular with the UK National Health Service.

Findings

The case study shows the very considerable impact, which the RNID had in effecting a dramatic improvement in the quality of the service offered through the move to digital hearing aids and through the improvement of the audiology services themselves. The RNID, through using its expertise, also succeeded in achieving a huge reduction in the unit cost of digital hearing aids. A value chain approach is utilised to examine the effect of the RNID.

Research limitations/implications

The case study furnishes an account of impact on a national level in a key service. It shows how a third sector organisation can use expertise to leverage impact using public sector resources. It shows that even with very large government purchases a key factor is specific knowledge, which if possessed by a third sector organisations, can be used to major effect.

Originality/value

The case study demonstrates impact and the effective operation of a cross‐sectoral partnership. One of the authors (Lamb) is closely involved from the organisational perspective.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Tracey Sharp

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the level of hearing loss in the population and describe the joint health and social care response in Hartlepool to the needs of…

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420

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the level of hearing loss in the population and describe the joint health and social care response in Hartlepool to the needs of this group of people.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach included a review of the literature, the application of national prevalence tables to local population estimates, and a review of the adequacy of current service provision available to people with a hearing loss.

Findings

More than 14,700 people out of a total population of 91,000 living in Hartlepool are estimated to have some degree of hearing loss. This compares with only 1,046 people registered with the adult social care team although 13,800 people were found to be registered with the local audiology department. The review found that a broad range of services was already in place across health and social care although some areas were identified for service improvement which are currently being addressed.

Originality/value

Drawing attention to the needs of a section of the community that is virtually invisible, this review served to highlight the scale of hearing loss prevalence in the population, to estimate the number of people with hearing loss in a local population using data that has been available for almost two decades (although not widely adopted), and demonstrates a unique cross‐sectoral approach to assessing and responding to the needs of people who have a loss of hearing.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Lindsay Bondurant

In most classrooms, where information is presented orally via spoken language, accurate knowledge of a student’s hearing status is crucial so that the interdisciplinary…

Abstract

In most classrooms, where information is presented orally via spoken language, accurate knowledge of a student’s hearing status is crucial so that the interdisciplinary team can ensure appropriate service provision. Audiologists play a key role on the interdisciplinary team to provide other professionals with information about children’s hearing status, communication needs, device use, and intervention strategies. Conversely, audiologists gain valuable information and strategies from other team members.

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Interdisciplinary Connections to Special Education: Key Related Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-663-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Renee McCulloch, Katherine Martin and Clare Robertson

Sensorineural hearing loss is a common sequel of bacterial meningitis in childhood and hearing assessment post‐meningitis is therefore essential. An audit performed of…

Abstract

Sensorineural hearing loss is a common sequel of bacterial meningitis in childhood and hearing assessment post‐meningitis is therefore essential. An audit performed of practice in a tertiary centre paediatric unit over 24 months in 1994‐1995 showed an 89 per cent referral and 81 per cent attendance rate for audiological assessment following bacterial meningitis. A repeat retrospective audit was performed over 12 months in 1998‐1999 following the introduction of guidelines and measures to improve education of medical staff and communication between professionals. This achieved a 100 per cent referral and attendance rate in a series of 27 children surviving bacterial meningitis in 1998‐1999, demonstrating the success of the process of the complete audit cycle in improving clinical practice.

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Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Ivan Russo, Ilenia Confente, David M. Gligor and Nicola Cobelli

This study investigated business-to-business (B2B) repeated purchase intent and its relationships with customer value and customer satisfaction. Additionally, it explored…

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1527

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated business-to-business (B2B) repeated purchase intent and its relationships with customer value and customer satisfaction. Additionally, it explored the link between willingness to purchase again, switching costs and product returns management. Modern customers are more likely to switch suppliers; however, previous research suggests that this behaviour can be attenuated by a robust returns management experience. The purpose of this study was to provide a revised model of B2B repeated purchase intent that integrates the concept of product returns management and switching costs with existing B2B customer repurchase intent models.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a qualitative inquiry based on semi-structured interviews was conducted to test and develop a quantitative survey. Then a survey was then sent to business owners operating in the audiology industry. Finally, there were 317 responses.

Findings

The authors reveal the complex relationship between returns management and repeated purchase intent. Specifically, the authors’ results indicate that the effect of product returns on repurchase intent is opposite to the effect of customer value, depending on the value of customer value. The authors’ findings indicate that even when switching costs are low, firms can positively impact the intent to purchase again in the future if they increase the level of customer satisfaction. In addition, the authors’ findings indicate that in the context of B2B a high/low level of customer satisfaction does not trigger a positive effect of managing product returns on repurchase intent.

Originality/value

This study was the first to introduce the concept of product returns management to research on B2B repurchase intent.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Daniela Lucangeli, Elisabetta Genovese, Marco Gubernale, Silvia Cabrele and Daniele Manzoni

This study synthesizes some preliminary observations made by the clinicians of the Audiology and Phoniatrics Department of Padua-Treviso University on the development of…

Abstract

This study synthesizes some preliminary observations made by the clinicians of the Audiology and Phoniatrics Department of Padua-Treviso University on the development of numerical intelligence in deaf children who received cochlear implantation at an early age. This study collected data from clinical observation and standardized instruments, such as Leiter-R and PRCR-Numeri, on a group of 11 preschool deaf children. These data were then compared with those obtained from language performances and audiometric examinations. It is generally recognized that a normal cognitive profile corresponds to scaled scores between 85 and 122. Specifically, the Numerical Intelligence competence is lower in deaf children than in normally hearing children. In particular, the most obvious difference is in the “number comparison” performance, which involves mental operations. In our study, we observed a meaningful connection between Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and the Fluid Reasoning (Fr) score, that is, the ability to solve non-verbal problems independent of previous learning. These results appear to demonstrate a pronounced connectivity of the subcomponents which, taken together, produce visual-spatial functionality.

Details

International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-503-1

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