Search results

1 – 10 of over 33000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Yanji Duan, John A. Aloysius and Diane A. Mollenkopf

Firms employ various forms of disclosure to demonstrate commitment to and involvement in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices. This research provides…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms employ various forms of disclosure to demonstrate commitment to and involvement in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices. This research provides guidance to firms employing framing strategies when communicating their SSCM with external stakeholders like consumers as part of their supply chain transparency efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a middle-range theorizing approach to understand the context of SSCM practices and mechanisms of variously framed communication methods to disclose sustainability information to consumers. The authors conducted two experiments in an e-waste recycling context, studying how sustainable information disclosed to consumers using attribute framing and goal framing can affect consumers' attitudes. The authors also examined the moderating role of consumers' environmental involvement.

Findings

Results suggest that when attribute framing is used, firms should avoid framing the attribute from a negative valence. When goal framing is used, messages with consequences stated as “avoid loss” yield the most substantial effect. Additionally, framing effects are more significant for consumers with higher-than-average environmental involvement.

Originality/value

The authors’ results contribute to the ongoing theorization of SSCM by providing contextual understanding of how to communicate sustainability information. Corroborating evidence from marketing, framing effects are found to be context specific, thereby elucidating the framing literature more fully to the SSCM context. The authors extend this literature by studying attribute framing and comparing the effectiveness of all possible goal framing combinations of valence and gain/loss perspective in the SSCM communication context.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Simon J. Pervan and Andrea Vocino

The purpose of this paper is to explore how message framing is commonly used by magazine advertisers.

Downloads
1612

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how message framing is commonly used by magazine advertisers.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the classification suggested by Levin et al., the frequency and nature of message framing in magazine advertising is explored using a content analysis of 2,864 advertisements in a sample of popular US magazines.

Findings

Results suggest a lack of consistency between marketing practice and academic findings. Contrary to academic recommendations, advertisers used positive framing in almost all advertising messages. Further, the use of attribute framing and combined attribute and goal framing was more popular than pure goal framing

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings are limited by a judgement sample of US magazines, they do suggest the need for academics to conduct more research on the effectiveness of combined attribute and goal framing techniques.

Practical implications

Of equal importance is the need for practitioners to explore the potentiality of negative framing in their advertising content.

Originality/value

Adopting the Levin et al.'s typology, this paper highlights the need for advertising researchers to engage with practitioners to try to understand current industry practice with regard to message framing. The inconsistencies revealed in this paper point to either an insufficient understanding of message framing by one or both parties or the need for better communication between the two.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

William A. Kerler, A. Scott Fleming and Christopher D. Allport

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of attribute frames and justifications on capital budgeting decisions and to examine whether the requirement to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of attribute frames and justifications on capital budgeting decisions and to examine whether the requirement to provide justification for a capital budgeting decision moderates the effect of attribute frames.

Methodology

One-hundred and eleven participants made a capital budgeting decision in an experimental case that manipulated the frame of the financial evidence provided and the requirement to provide a justification.

Findings

Results suggest that both attribute frames and justifications affect capital budgeting decisions but the requirement to provide justifications did not moderate the effect of attribute frames.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the capital budgeting literature by identifying two factors that may bias judgments. This study also contributes to the framing literature by examining one potential method of moderating framing effects – requiring justification for decisions.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-632-3

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Pingjun Jiang, Siva K. Balasubramanian and Zarrel V. Lambert

Despite significant business spending in areas such as personalization tools and add-on options representing levels of product attributes, most marketers do not know the…

Downloads
2194

Abstract

Purpose

Despite significant business spending in areas such as personalization tools and add-on options representing levels of product attributes, most marketers do not know the amount of value that is directly attributable to their e-customization strategies. This study aims to offer an in-depth investigation of consumers' value perceptions of e-customization and their relationship with perceived sufficiency of information and cognitive cost. The context effects on value perception in e-customization are studied together with antecedent constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consists of a 2×2 between-subjects factorial design. The full model is tested using multiple-group structural equation modeling analysis to verify the significance of the inter-relationships between constructs, as well as the main and the interaction effects of two experimental factors (product information framing and product type).

Findings

The experimental results showed that perceived e-customization value does not simply stem from the ability to “narrow-cast” content more specifically related to a shopper's interests (i.e. anticipated fulfillment value). Rather, this value also stems from the dynamic flexibility of the information system and its ability to entertain and educate during the information dissemination process (i.e. process value and knowledge value). Furthermore, when the customization framing features are better matched with product type characteristics, e-customization seemed to increase value in ways that are difficult to achieve in conventional shopping environments.

Originality/value

By testing the proposed structural model simultaneously with two experimental factors of product type and information framing, this work is the first to address the question of context effects on value creation in an area of increasing substantive importance.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2012

William A. Kerler, Christopher D. Allport and A. Scott Fleming

Capital budgeting projects fail about as often as they succeed. Recent research shows that accountants may frame information related to capital budgeting projects to be…

Abstract

Capital budgeting projects fail about as often as they succeed. Recent research shows that accountants may frame information related to capital budgeting projects to be consistent with their preference for the project (e.g., accept or reject), perhaps in order to persuade management to agree with them. Psychology research consistently shows that framed information results in systematic differences in judgments. The purpose of this study is to examine whether framed information affects capital budgeting decisions, and to examine whether this effect is moderated by the importance of the potential project. Results from an experimental case completed by 173 participants indicate attribute frames affect capital budgeting decisions, however, the effect is moderated by the importance of the decision.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-105-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Ashutosh Dixit, Kenneth D. Hall and Sujay Dutta

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of price attribute framing and factors such as urgency and perceived price fairness on customer willingness to…

Downloads
1074

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of price attribute framing and factors such as urgency and perceived price fairness on customer willingness to pay (WTP) in automated retail settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two sets of quasi-experimental scenarios surrounding vending-machine purchase decisions. The first set was analyzed with MANOVA, the second set with choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis.

Findings

When prices are framed positively (as a discount), customer WTP is higher at high published price levels than it is for unframed or negatively framed prices. The effect on WTP holds whether the reference price range is broad (few large increments) or narrow (numerous small increments). In the CBC scenarios, immediate availability of the product was most influential on choice, followed by price and brand effects. These findings held under conditions invoking both urgency and price fairness. Providing an explanation for higher prices increases perceived price fairness.

Research limitations/implications

Further study might assess the presence or absence of interaction effects in the conjoint scenarios.

Practical implications

Managers should consider transparency in dynamic pricing, particularly when the price change is outside the control of the firm. The conjoint scenario results also offer evidence that dynamic pricing will not impact other marketing-mix decisions for fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) dramatically (availability at point of purchase and presence in the consumer consideration set remain strong influences on choice).

Social implications

Understanding these effects on WTP could help managers manage perceptions of unfairness and optimize WTP.

Originality/value

A theoretical contribution from this study is that the immediate loss/gain consideration under theories of decision making under uncertainty outweigh considerations such as scarcity urgency or perceived unfairness. Use of conjoint analysis in WTP research, study of dynamic pricing in FMCG setting.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 29 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Irwin P. Levin, Gary J. Gaeth, Felicitas Evangelista, Gerald Albaum and Judy Schreiber

Cites the existence of information framing effects as an interesting phenomenon in the area of human judgements and decision‐making. Uses three distinct types of framing

Downloads
920

Abstract

Cites the existence of information framing effects as an interesting phenomenon in the area of human judgements and decision‐making. Uses three distinct types of framing effect and the hypothesis identified by Leven et al (1998). Studies the reliability of these effects across samples of subjects in the USA and Australia. Shows that, for two of the three types, attribute framing and risky choice framing, the effects were strong and almost identical in the two samples. Highlights a significant effect for the US sample, but not the Australian sample, for the third type, goal framing. Discusses results in terms of the reliability of the effects and their potential for revealing cross‐cultural differences in values.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Raj Arora

This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of message framing and source credibility on attitudes, intentions and beliefs about attributes of teeth whitening…

Downloads
3330

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of message framing and source credibility on attitudes, intentions and beliefs about attributes of teeth whitening products. Although each of these variables, message framing and credibility, has been explored individually, few attempts have been made to investigate them jointly. This study aims to base itself on a full factorial design that allows for testing of interaction effects. Similar investigations in marketing limit their inquiries primarily to attitudes and intentions as dependent variables. This study goes further in that it also aims to investigate the effect of framing and credibility on the salient attributes of products. Third, the market for whitening products is maturing, resulting in a target market that is gaining knowledge about these products. Thus, the paper seeks to use knowledge as a covariate in the above investigation to determine if the communication strategy should be changed as the product moves from introduction to maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a 2 × 2 factorial design with framing (positive‐negative) and credibility (high‐low). The setting for the study is a hypothetical brand name of teeth whitening products.

Findings

The results reveal that positive framing is more effective in changing attitudes and intentions. However, the effects of framing and credibility are significant in changing beliefs related to the product's attributes. Although the covariate knowledge is significant, the findings indicate that communication strategy need not change as the product moves from introduction to maturity.

Research limitations/implications

Caution is advised in extrapolating the results beyond the issues investigated in the study.

Practical implications

The findings help marketers in formulating effective strategies.

Originality/value

The focus of most research studies in marketing is on changing attitudes and intentions. This research also includes the change in beliefs regarding the attributes of the product. Prior research on framing is tilted towards the use of negative framing. The findings of this study suggest using positive or gain‐framed messages.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Monica Rossolini, Alessia Pedrazzoli and Alessandro Ronconi

Recognising the growing importance of environmental and sustainable activities and the role of communication strategies in soliciting their financing, this work…

Abstract

Purpose

Recognising the growing importance of environmental and sustainable activities and the role of communication strategies in soliciting their financing, this work investigates the influence of message framing, green emphasis and quantitative information on the probability of green crowdfunding campaigns' success.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis is based on crowdfunding campaigns published between 2015 and 2020 on the Indiegogo platform in the category “Community projects – Environment”. The study develops an in-depth qualitative content analysis of the projects before performing an empirical examination to determine funding causes.

Findings

Communication strategies (message framing, green emphasis and quantitative goals) affect funding success. However, project category moderates the impact of message framing and green emphasis on campaign success. While positive framing increases agri-food campaign success, negative framing is more effective for clean energy and climate preservation projects. Moreover, indication of a quantitative goal and a marked green emphasis in a project's presentation increase campaign success, but a too marked green emphasis is only effective for agri-food projects.

Practical implications

Green entrepreneurs and campaign managers must work carefully on their projects' communication, accounting for the type of product proposed, emphasising green components in its description and utilising quantitative information to present future goals. These strategies maximise backers' responses and enable entrepreneurs to obtain funding. The authors’ findings may be extended to other contexts, including the banking sector, to craft effective communication strategies for green financial products.

Originality/value

By applying framing theory in a new context (i.e. the online financing of green entrepreneurs), this study identifies new campaign success determinants and provides evidence for the moderating role of project category. Furthermore, the study highlights the need to develop different communication strategies for social and environmental-oriented projects.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2007

Phil Wickham

Strategists have always known that how you say something is as important as what you say. We are beginning to understand why. The article discusses the concept of message …

Downloads
2257

Abstract

Purpose

Strategists have always known that how you say something is as important as what you say. We are beginning to understand why. The article discusses the concept of message “framing” and how this affects peoples' attitude towards risk. It argues that this can easily form part of the strategist's communication toolkit.

Design/methodology/approach

The study of framing effects is a very active research. Interest ranges from the fundamental psychological underpinning for the effect, impact on small group decision making (the effects need not be eliminated and may in fact be enhanced), human resource strategy, ethical decision‐making and the interaction of framing with broader organizational and environmental factors.

Findings

Framing effects on risk decision‐making has been robustly demonstrated in a wide variety of decision settings. Expert decision makers are as prone to framing effects as are naïve decision makers. They are consistent enough to be adopted as a reliable tool in the strategists' communication toolbox.

Practical implications

The strategist is likely to understand message emphasis and may be aware of general message packaging; he or she is less likely to be aware of message framing, its impact and potential value as a part of the strategic communication toolkit. Attitude towards – acceptance of or rejection of – risk is of course critical to the effective implementation of strategic programs.

Originality/value

This article concerns itself with one aspect of strategic communication that has received extensive attention from organizational and cognitive psychology: the issue of decision task framing.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 33000