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1 – 10 of 958
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Y.N. Li, K.C. Tan and M. Xie

The ability of a company to achieve excellence in service quality depends on the determination of service attributes and their desired levels. It depends also on the…

3417

Abstract

The ability of a company to achieve excellence in service quality depends on the determination of service attributes and their desired levels. It depends also on the prioritization of service attributes, using appropriate quality improvement indices, in a consistent manner within the constraints of limited resources. There is a need to develop an operational procedure that would prioritize customer service attributes in a simple, inexpensive, and accurate manner. Well‐established instruments that measure service quality, such as SERVQUAL, have conceptualized the linear and symmetric relationship between service quality gaps and overall service quality. This paper investigated the asymmetric and nonlinear nature of this relationship and developed a model to advance utility theory into prioritization at the attribute level as well as at the dimensional level. In the service literature, this is a first attempt to apply utility theory in the prioritization of service attributes to help achieve quality in customer service.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Sandra Liu, Jie Chen, Zhaonan Sun and Michael Yu Zhu

Increasing consumer choices in health care results in keener competition faced by providers. The existing nonlinear and asymmetric impact of patient perceived quality of…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing consumer choices in health care results in keener competition faced by providers. The existing nonlinear and asymmetric impact of patient perceived quality of care to their choices should provide insights for hospitals to deploy limited resources to areas that produces most significant and positive outcomes. This study aims to develop an algorithm for examining the nonlinear and asymmetrical relationships in the health-care domain with the hope to provide a more precise indication as to how specifically addressing patient experience with meaningful improvements of service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained through telephone surveys of 2,000 inpatients who had been hospitalized in a health system in 2006. After coding the original data, the authors conducted regression analysis and Z-test to investigate the nonlinear and asymmetrical relationship between patient recommendation and perceived hospital attributes.

Findings

“Spiritual care” is considered as a “delight” for patients. “Procedure efficiency”, “Compassionate care” and “Mutual communication” linearly related to patients’ likelihood to recommend the hospital (LTR) in the positive domains, but increasingly sensitive to LTR in negative domain.

Practical implications

Examining the asymmetry and the nonlinear relationship can detect diminishing effect of certain drivers for patient satisfaction. An emphasis on patients’ spiritual needs can provide the hospital with a unique opportunity to differentiate itself from other health-care providers which usually compete within the ordinary domain of services. The absence of “Procedure efficiency”, “Compassionate care” and “Mutual communication” will result in extremely negative word-of-mouth.

Originality/value

This study has developed an algorithm to examine the asymmetry and the nonlinear relationship between perceived hospital performance and patient satisfaction. The insights generated should help providers determine specific sets of priorities for improving services and hence strategize for optimal deployment of limited resources.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Kurt Matzler, Birgit Renzl and Rita Faullant

The purpose of this study is to replicate and extend the findings of Matzler et al.'s recent paper on the dimensionality of price satisfaction. Furthermore, a test is…

4244

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to replicate and extend the findings of Matzler et al.'s recent paper on the dimensionality of price satisfaction. Furthermore, a test is performed to ascertain whether the relationship between satisfaction with the individual price dimensions and overall satisfaction is symmetric or asymmetric, as the three‐factor theory of customer satisfaction suggests.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a random sample of 406 bank customers, the impact of five price dimensions (price‐quality ratio, price fairness, price transparency, price reliability, and relative price) on overall satisfaction is tested using structural equation modeling with Partial Least Squares (PLS). The asymmetric relationship is tested using regression analysis with dummy variables.

Findings

The results confirm Matzler et al.'s findings and show that price satisfaction can be conceptualized as a multidimensional construct and that the five price dimensions have a strong and significant impact on overall satisfaction. Furthermore, it is shown that the relationship between satisfaction of individual price dimensions and overall price satisfaction can be asymmetric, indicating that the three‐factor theory of customer satisfaction is applicable also to price satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The study replicates previous findings and supports the multi‐dimensional nature of price satisfaction and shows that the three‐factor theory of customer satisfaction applies also to price satisfaction.

Practical implications

The measurement of price satisfaction at the level of individual price dimensions and the assessment of asymmetric relationships provides managers with more precise data in order to take the right measures to increase satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper confirms previous findings on the dimensionality of price satisfaction in a random sample of bank customers using structural equation modeling with PLS. Hence, it provides strong empirical support for Matzler et al.'s findings.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Martin Löfgren, Lars Witell and Anders Gustafsson

Almost everything consumers buy in a store has a package. At point of purchase, the first moment of truth, the package functions as a silent salesman. Once the purchase is…

8115

Abstract

Purpose

Almost everything consumers buy in a store has a package. At point of purchase, the first moment of truth, the package functions as a silent salesman. Once the purchase is made, the product is consumed in the second moment of truth. The purpose of this paper is to create a better understanding of how customers evaluate different aspects of the package in the first and second moments of truth.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical investigation is conducted on how customers experience three different packages for everyday commodities in the first and second moments of truth. Causal modeling is used to analyze the impact of different benefits of a package onto customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Findings

It was found that both benefits and attributes can have different roles in affecting customer satisfaction and loyalty in different parts of the consumption cycle. Furthermore, the results show that there are significant differences for the impacts of customer satisfaction on loyalty in the first moment of truth compared to the second moment of truth.

Practical implications

By applying a consumption system approach, it is possible for managers to design a package that can attract customers in the first moment of truth and at the same time create customer satisfaction in the second moment of truth.

Originality/value

The research shows that the role of certain benefits and attributes can be different in the purchase and use situation. Previously, this has been modeled separately but by operationalizing the first and second moment of truth in the same model the true effects of various benefits and attributes can be identified.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Margaret L. Sheng, Chia‐Lin Hsu and Cou‐Chen Wu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the asymmetric effect of negative and positive attribute‐level performance (i.e. effort expectancy, performance expectancy, social…

2243

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the asymmetric effect of negative and positive attribute‐level performance (i.e. effort expectancy, performance expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, flow experience, and satisfaction) of online social networking (OSN) on behavioral intention.

Design/methodology/approach

An investigation of behavioral intention in OSN was conducted, with a total of 482 effective questionnaires collected. The psychometric properties of the measures were investigated and a dummy‐variable regression model was applied to estimate the regression coefficients.

Findings

The results confirm that the importance of asymmetrical effect is not equivalent for different attributes. Negative performance on performance expectancy, effort expectancy, flow experience, and satisfaction had a larger effect on behavioral intention than positive performance. In contrast, positive performance on social influence and facilitating conditions had a larger effect on behavioral intention than negative performance.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the extant literature by offering an empirical investigation of the asymmetric effect of OSN attribute‐level performance on behavioral intention. Furthermore, by focusing on the positive‐negative asymmetry effect, the proposed model also significantly increases the value of OSN through an understanding of behavioral intention and its antecedents.

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Miao Zhao and Ruby Roy Dholakia

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions in the context of a transactional web site. How do web site attributes influence customer satisfaction…

4984

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions in the context of a transactional web site. How do web site attributes influence customer satisfaction? Will an increase in the performance of a specific attribute lead to increased satisfaction?

Design/methodology/approach

Since interactivity is considered a distinguishing characteristic of the new media and a web site is composed of multiple attributes, the paper empirically examines the interactivity‐satisfaction relationship at the individual attribute level using the Kano methodology. Changes in the interactivity‐satisfaction relationships over time and with user experience are also analyzed.

Findings

The paper identifies several relationships between interactive web site attributes and customer satisfaction. At this stage of web development, no attribute emerges as a “must‐be” attribute; one‐dimensional or linear attributes are common but not the only category of interactive attributes. In addition, mixed and attractive attributes were also found. Moreover, the paper confirms that Kano categories shift over time and with usage experience.

Practical implications

Different web site design strategies should be used depending on users' online experience and the various relationships between interactive web site attributes and customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

No previous research has yet examined interactivity at the attribute level. Web site designers and managers have to make decisions regarding each attribute. Adopting the Kano methodology, widely used in other areas of research, this paper examines the relationships between attribute‐level interactivity and customer satisfaction with a retail web site.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Abdallah Jamal Dweekat, Gyusun Hwang and Jinwoo Park

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a more practical approach for supply chain performance measurement (SCPM) and to approve the promising role of internet of things…

3352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a more practical approach for supply chain performance measurement (SCPM) and to approve the promising role of internet of things (IoT) technologies in SCPM systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that includes literature review analysis, designing a new approach for SCPM, and a case study scenario for proving its applicability.

Findings

The case study scenario shows that IoT can enhance SCPM, as it has the capability to enable real-time data collection, increase data efficiency as long as enable real-time communication within the supply chain (SC).

Practical implications

The proposed approach can help to develop performance measurement systems and applications enabled by IoT technologies. These systems can be used to monitor, manage, and control the overall SC in real time and in a more integrated and cooperative manner.

Originality/value

This paper provides a structured systems building approach tailored to show how to employ IoT technologies in the field of SCPM. This approach could help in establishing new performance measurement applications, and it is believed that both practitioners and researchers will benefit from it.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Jorge Vera-Martinez and Sidney Ornelas

Product performance measurements have been used to explain other business performance variables. The purpose of this paper is to propose that, regarding Mexican consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

Product performance measurements have been used to explain other business performance variables. The purpose of this paper is to propose that, regarding Mexican consumers, the “comparison-based perceived attribute performance” (CAP) approach is a better predictor of outcomes, such as satisfaction, value and loyalty, compared with the traditional measurement of “non-comparison-based perceived attribute performance” (NCAP). These two forms of assessing attribute-level performance may be considered as different constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using these two approaches, empirical tests were performed to attribute performance measurement and were conducted on products from two different categories: tequila and liquid dishwashing detergent. Regression analyses were performed using Mexican consumer samples of n=295 and n=239, respectively.

Findings

As opposed to NCAP, CAP measurements yielded higher statistical levels of satisfaction, value and loyalty for both product categories. In the case of tequila, factor analysis indicated a clear separation between the two types of measurements, suggesting that they should be considered distinct constructs. However, this was not found for the other product category.

Originality/value

CAP, which has better potential to predict outcomes than NCAP, could have relevant implications in brand positioning assessment and importance-performance analyses.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Pingjun Jiang and Bert Rosenbloom

Compared with the emphasis that service quality research has received in online marketing, much less work has been done on the role of price perception, service…

21517

Abstract

Purpose

Compared with the emphasis that service quality research has received in online marketing, much less work has been done on the role of price perception, service attribute‐level performance and satisfaction that unfolds over time, and their effects on customer retention. This paper seeks to fill this gap in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds propositions about the role of price and customer satisfaction at different stages on customers' intention to return. Research hypotheses are developed based on theory from the combined literatures of services, product pricing, and behavioral decision theory. Data from the e‐retailing industry related to two specific periods of shopping experience (at checkout and after delivery) are used in the empirical tests. Structural equation modeling is employed to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that after‐delivery satisfaction has a much stronger influence on both overall customer satisfaction and intention to return than at‐checkout satisfaction, and that price perception, when measured on a comparative basis, has a direct and positive effect on customer overall satisfaction and intention to return.

Research limitations/implications

The data are only available from surveying customers who have made purchases. Future study can investigate how satisfaction with shopping convenience has impacted customer acquisition. Measures of actual return behavior, as opposed to behavioral intentions, will also enhance the validity of the study.

Practical implications

This paper concludes that excellence pre‐sales service is not necessarily an advantage that allows e‐tailers to develop customer retention. In fact, e‐tailers might command higher customer retention through providing good performance in after‐delivery service and continuously generating favorable price perceptions among customers because both have a strong and positive influence on return intention.

Originality/value

This research conceptualizes and explores different aspects of satisfaction that unfold over time, regarding customers' whole shopping experience with a particular e‐retailer. It is a pioneer work that empirically investigates the relative contribution of at‐checkout and after‐delivery satisfaction in generating intention to return to an e‐tailer.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Bruno Busacca and Giovanna Padula

There is a pressing need for practitioners to adopt viable analytic procedures that may help them optimize resource allocation to strengthen customer satisfaction. This…

6383

Abstract

Purpose

There is a pressing need for practitioners to adopt viable analytic procedures that may help them optimize resource allocation to strengthen customer satisfaction. This paper reviews a range of procedures used for measuring customer satisfaction that are identified in the literature and tests which procedures might be more useful to practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Customer satisfaction measurement procedures developed in the literature are reviewed to assess the non‐linear and asymmetric relationship between attribute performance and overall satisfaction. A convergent validity test between the two measurement procedures that the review suggests are the most suitable for application in practice is then conducted to discover the relative merits of each. The test is based on an empirical investigation carried out in the mobile communication industry.

Findings

Two measurement procedures were identified as the most appropriate to practitioners, “regression with dummy variables” and the “Importance Grid”. These were compared using a convergent validity test, which revealed a lack convergent validity between the two. Discussion about the reliability of the two procedures and the implications for practice is provided. On balance, the regression with dummy variables was identified as the better approach.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance that recognition is given to the non‐linear and asymmetric response of customer satisfaction to the performance of different product/service attributes if appropriate decisions are to be made for allocating marketing resources. While research on customer satisfaction has emphasized the need to account for the non‐linear and asymmetric relationship between attribute performance and overall satisfaction, no effort has been made to disseminate these insights fully among practitioners. Since understanding the relationship between attribute performance and overall satisfaction is paramount if resource allocation to improve attribute performance is to be prioritized correctly, there is a pressing concern to move customer satisfaction programs closer to the theory predictions. A range of measurement procedures is reviewed and compared. Through this work, academics and practitioners may gain further insight into procedures for measuring customer satisfaction and an understanding of the relative benefits and limitations of the procedures that may be adopted.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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