Search results

1 – 10 of over 28000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Judi Marshall and Peter Reason

The paper aims to offer the notion of “taking an attitude of inquiry” as a quality process in research, enabling researchers to be aware of and articulate the complex…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to offer the notion of “taking an attitude of inquiry” as a quality process in research, enabling researchers to be aware of and articulate the complex processes of interpretation, reflection and action they engage in. The purpose is to consider this as a quality process that complements more procedural approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on 25 years experience in an action research community – in which the authors have developed theory and practice in the company of colleagues – to articulate and illustrate what “taking an attitude of inquiry” can mean. The paper seeks to make quality practices thus developed available to a wider community of researchers.

Findings

Two schema with illustrations are offered. Qualities that enable taking an attitude of inquiry are suggested: curiosity, willingness to articulate and explore purposes, humility, participation and radical empiricism. Disciplines of inquiring practice are identified as: paying attention to framing and its pliability; enabling participation to generate high quality knowing, appreciating issues of power; working with multiple ways of knowing; and engaging in, and explicating, research as an emergent process.

Research limitations/implications

Research is depicted as both disciplined and alive. Researchers are invited to engage fully in self‐reflective practice to enhance quality and validity.

Originality/value

An articulation of a depth view of quality in self‐reflective research practice which has been developed in an action research context and can be applied to research more generally.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Melissa A. Norcross and Michael R. Manning

The presence and practice of individual and organizational humility has the power to enable organizational growth and change. Humility drives behaviors associated with…

Abstract

The presence and practice of individual and organizational humility has the power to enable organizational growth and change. Humility drives behaviors associated with learning and the ability to embrace the value of existing mental models while valuing the insights offered by new perspectives and approaches. This paradox-savvy practice, observed in humble individuals and organizations, allows them to appropriately value what is working about the existing system while simultaneously embracing the need for change. Our research finds humble behaviors emerging within psychologically safe environments that foster an attitude of inquiry, kinship, extraordinary collaboration, and professional excellence. Humble behaviors, at every organizational level, appear to enhance both individual and group capabilities that drive long term strategic advantage. Five capabilities were identified in our research: diverse networks, shared values, flexibility and adaptability, judgment and decision-making, and organizational learning. We bring these concepts to life by synthesizing established and emerging research, as well as diving deeply into an empirical case study that leverages humble practices in order to effectively drive organizational change. We argue that humility can impact organizing at all levels (individuals, leaders, followers, teams, executives, and organizations) and in so doing create the conditions in which sustainable organizational change can flourish.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-554-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Monica Vezzosi

This paper presents an overview of the action research methodology and asserts its suitability as an approach to enquiry and practice in the field of information literacy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an overview of the action research methodology and asserts its suitability as an approach to enquiry and practice in the field of information literacy (IL). An experience of action research is briefly presented and some strengths and weaknesses of this methodological approach are critically discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research was adopted for investigating the impact of an IL programme on a homogeneous group of students at the University of Parma (Italy). The project consisted of a cycle of four stages: observing, planning, acting, evaluating. Peer observation was adopted both as a validation method and as a support for the reflection on the research process.

Findings

Action research is a suitable approach for teaching librarians, as it allows them to experience the role of teacher, researcher and reflective practitioner all together, thus favouring reflection on the complex, “multitask” role that they are playing today. Moreover, action research puts teaching librarians in an attitude of learning from the educational context in which they work, encourages sharing of experiences and promotes change in library context.

Originality/value

This contribution could encourage teaching librarians to adopt action research as a new approach to enquiry and practice and as a way to investigate their context, reflect on their actions and promote change in the field of IL.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Judi Marshall

The purpose of this paper is to review action research approaches to changing practice through reflection, identifying themes, issues and questions relevant to a broader…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review action research approaches to changing practice through reflection, identifying themes, issues and questions relevant to a broader community of research practitioners. It invites additional layering in concept, enactment and account.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework for considering interwoven dimensions of action research as first‐, second‐ and third‐person inquiry is presented. The paper then works through stories to explore the complementarities of action research with other genres of research, addressing developments of practice through reflection. Questions of general relevance are identified.

Findings

Action research is a richly diverse range of approaches having much in common with a broader community who seek to develop embodied practice and practical knowing, work in collaboration, respect multiple ways of knowing, and influence change in social systems. Frames, approaches, practices and questions from action research can be applied more generally. The paper articulates a profusion of questions. These include inviting attention to researchers' reflective practices, to different ways of exploring issues of power, and to questioning (organizational) contexts in which interventions are set.

Practical implications

Practices of inquiry and intervention for social and organizational change are explored. Attention is drawn to issues of power and how they might affect action with a participatory intent. Ways of developing understandings and enactments are offered.

Originality/value

This paper offers a companion language and set of practices from which to view other genres of research/intervention interested in developing practice through reflection.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lasse Lychnell and Pär Mårtensson

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the advancement of research methods in management spirituality by proposing a novel and innovative approach for generating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the advancement of research methods in management spirituality by proposing a novel and innovative approach for generating empirical material on issues relevant for practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach introduced is designed as a one-year group process based on Schein’s concept of clinical inquiry, primarily aimed at helping the participating managers to address challenging issues that they face in real life. When this helping process is successful, empirical material on these issues is revealed, as the participants share information to receive help themselves.

Findings

Findings illustrate how the approach generates extensive, rich and broad data, guided by what becomes important for the participating managers as the process unfolds. A strong holding environment allows for urgent matters to be shared straight from the heart.

Research limitations/implications

As this activity is based on the belief that the managers know best the issues relevant to them, a deviation from the assumed research direction should be seen as help to focus on relevant issues, rather than an obstacle of following an original plan.

Practical implications

The proposed approach may be of particular interest to researchers who not only want to contribute to academic knowledge but also wish to work with people and facilitate transformation.

Originality/value

This paper advances understandings of generating empirical material in the field of management spirituality through an innovative, client-centered research approach, rooted in well-established theories.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Shelena Keulemans and Steven Van de Walle

The purpose of this paper is to explore and explain public preferences for different public procurement practices. The paper looks into public support for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and explain public preferences for different public procurement practices. The paper looks into public support for cost-effectiveness, discriminatory procurement in favour of domestic suppliers and sustainable procurement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Eurobarometer public opinion data on 26.836 EU citizens from 27 EU countries.

Findings

This paper shows that EU citizens want public authorities to evaluate multiple aspects of any procurement offer in their public procurement decisions. It also found that, although cost-effectiveness and domestic favouritism are still important to EU citizens, citizens are most supportive of the objectives of sustainable procurement. Some associations between citizens’ procurement preferences and their social characteristics and political attitudes were found, but these only explain citizen procurement preferences to a limited extent. Country of residence has the strongest association with citizens’ acceptance of the objectives of sustainable procurement.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the data contain information on the procurement preferences of a large number of EU citizens, it is a topic of inquiry that is sensitive to social desirability bias.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the empirical understanding of public attitudes towards public procurement. It is one of few studies on citizen attitudes towards different public procurement practices.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mark Minott

The purpose of the self-study is two-fold: first, to aid in redressing the lack of attention given to the professional development i.e., the building of practical or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the self-study is two-fold: first, to aid in redressing the lack of attention given to the professional development i.e., the building of practical or work-related knowledge of examination invigilators and second, to forward the idea that engaging the examination invigilation process reflectively is an effective form of self-directed professional development.

Design/methodology/approach

The report uses reflective journaling based on Minott (2017) reflective approach to teaching practicum debriefing strategy to show the practical or work-related knowledge built by the author.

Findings

The report shows how the author built practical or work-related knowledge about critical aspects of the invigilation process: adaptability/flexibility, leading humanely and “thinking on your feet”/reflection-in-action.

Originality/value

This paper shows (through a critical discussion of the literature, coupled with the author’s personal professional experiences displayed in reflective journal entries) that an attitude of self-directed inquiry combined with reflective journaling can enable professional development i.e. the development of practical or work-related knowledge.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Kishani Townshend and Nerina Caltabiano

At the nexus of mindfulness and parenting lies the fusion of two influential yet contradictory epistemologies, the Eastern contemplative practices with the Western…

Abstract

At the nexus of mindfulness and parenting lies the fusion of two influential yet contradictory epistemologies, the Eastern contemplative practices with the Western parenting research. Mindful parenting is a parenting style, which has grown in popularity in recent times to support parents during pregnancy, birth and beyond. The current study is the third stage of a mixed methods study on mindful parenting. The first stage of the study design conducted a systematic review of mindful parenting. The second stage summarized the change processes identified in the systematic review. The aim of this pilot study is to clarify four clinicians’ perceptions of cognitive change processes associated with mindful parenting, particularly how theory is translated to practice. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyze semi-structured interviews. The six higher-order change processes were conceptualized as an anchor. Cognitive processes included intention, attention, attitude, and reflective functioning. Given its methodological limitations, the next future work needs is to survey a large sample of both clinicians and parents to verify the model. This paper makes an important contribution to the development of a more comprehensive theoretical model of mindful parenting.

Details

Transitions into Parenthood: Examining the Complexities of Childrearing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-222-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Heidi Upton

This chapter looks at New York City through the educational discipline known as aesthetic education (AE). It provides an example of an adaptation of this inquiry-based…

Abstract

This chapter looks at New York City through the educational discipline known as aesthetic education (AE). It provides an example of an adaptation of this inquiry-based methodology that emerges from a freshman transition course, Discover New York (DNY) taught by the author at St. John’s University. Through an examination of classroom pedagogy within the context of the course focus – homelessness in New York City – readers gain: an understanding of aesthetic education as a powerful tool for student engagement in general; and strategies for adapting processes described in the chapter into their own educational practice. Aesthetic education is an approach to learning that has at its center the use of works of art as texts to ignite curiosity and the desire to know more. In the case of this chapter’s journey, the city itself serves as the text, the “work of art.” The chapter maps classroom activities that engage learners’ imaginations in general inquiry, and deeper investigations into the central focus of the course, homelessness, addressing as well an integral element of the course, Academic Service Learning. Finally, it invites the reader to imagine how AE methodology might prove useful to other relevant courses, contexts, and settings.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Peter J. Boettke

The Austrian School of Economics, pioneered in the late nineteenth century by Menger and developed in the twentieth century by Mises and Hayek, is poised to make…

Abstract

The Austrian School of Economics, pioneered in the late nineteenth century by Menger and developed in the twentieth century by Mises and Hayek, is poised to make significant contributions to the methodology, analytics, and social philosophy of economics and political economy in the twenty-first century. But it can only do so if its practitioners accept responsibility to pursue the approach to its logical conclusions with confidence and absence of fear, and with an attitude of open inquiry, acceptance of their own fallibility, and a desire to track truth and offer social understanding. The reason the Austrian school is so well positioned to do this is because (1) it embraces its role as a human science, (2) it does not shy away from public engagement, (3) it takes a humble stance, (4) it seeks to be practical, and (5) there remains so much evolutionary potential to the ideas at the methodological, analytical, and social philosophical level that would challenge the conventional wisdom in economics, political science, sociology, history, law, business, and philosophy. The author explores these five tenants of Austrian economics as a response to the comments on his lead chapter “What Is Still Wrong with the Austrian School of Economics?”

1 – 10 of over 28000