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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Nicolas Papadopoulos, Mark Cleveland, Boris Bartikowski and Attila Yaprak

This study focuses on an inventory and typology of consumer dispositions towards “place” and relates it to the underlying theories, inputs and outcomes of place images and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on an inventory and typology of consumer dispositions towards “place” and relates it to the underlying theories, inputs and outcomes of place images and attitudes, aiming to unclutter a crowded research landscape by providing a holistic perspective of product/brand place associations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on extant literature to identify, analyze and discuss the consumer dispositions, theories and other elements related to place.

Findings

In total, 32 dispositions, 10 inputs to image formation, 28 permutations that complicate the understanding of place images, and 18 outcomes are discussed, providing a comprehensive perspective of the images of, and behaviours towards, various types of places from neighbourhoods to countries and beyond.

Research limitations/implications

Of the large number of constructs and combinations among them that are discussed, some have been studied fairly extensively, but most comprise “the road(s) less travelled”. The paper identifies relevant research gaps and numerous opportunities for new research.

Practical implications

Managers are aware and act upon some of the inventoried dispositions but can benefit by considering the complete array of constructs and concepts that are discussed.

Social implications

Individuals’ dispositions towards various places help to shape their self and social identities and are important in their daily life and consumption behaviour.

Originality/value

The study brings together for the first time a complete inventory of place-related dispositions alongside a wide range of related theories and concepts, thus advancing our knowledge of the nature and role of the country and other place-related images of products and brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Melvin Prince, Attila N. Yaprak and Dayananda Palihawadana

This paper aims to develop a model that explains the moral bases of consumer ethnocentrism and consumer cosmopolitanism as purchase dispositions. The authors build their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a model that explains the moral bases of consumer ethnocentrism and consumer cosmopolitanism as purchase dispositions. The authors build their work on moral foundations theory and the social theories of Emile Durkheim.

Design/methodology/approach

Theory-building from general theories of motivation is grounded in cultural norms, and empirical research is conducted to test theoretical propositions.

Findings

The focus is on the theoretical implications of binding or individualism morals of consumers within social groups. Consequently, variables in the model relate to ethical themes of community, autonomy and divinity. This theory posits that, for a variety of considerations, loyalty has a direct and positive effect on consumer ethnocentrism and on consumer cosmopolitanism. Serendipitously, other moral foundations have negative effects. The authors theorize that negative relationships exist between authority and consumer cosmopolitanism, and between sanctity and consumer ethnocentrism. This model also illustrates that consumer ethnocentrism positively predisposes favorable domestic product judgments.

Research limitations/implications

New ethical factors in consumer dispositions affecting product purchase decisions are explored. Hypotheses can be empirically replicated and moderated in future research.

Practical implications

Marketers can use the variables of personal values, moral foundations and gender role identity to fashion marketing communications and to target selective consumer segments.

Social implications

The persuasion process of social marketing will be enhanced by understanding relevant motives.

Originality/value

The use of the fine-grained moral foundation antecedents to predict consumer predispositions of ethnocentrism and cosmopolitanism is without precedent.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Attila Yaprak and Melvin Prince

The literature on consumer morality and consumption is spread widely across many research streams and would benefit from grouping under selected themes so that scholars…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on consumer morality and consumption is spread widely across many research streams and would benefit from grouping under selected themes so that scholars’ work can be guided by the compass of these themes. It is also important to add studies to each of these themes to serve as gateways that will guide new research. The aim of this special issue of the Journal of Consumer Marketing was to achieve precisely this purpose. The purpose of this paper is to open the gate to the exploration of the themes that today describe this landscape.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper assesses the contributions made in each of several domains to better understand, why and how moral consumption works, what its ingredients are and how it may grow in the future. There are at least four domains of morality and moral consumption studies as follows: the formation of the moral self and moral identity; moral identity and ethical consumption; moral reasoning (cognitive processes) and moral choice; and the moral self and marketing. Each of these domains of work provides insight into the moral consumption phenomenon.

Findings

The authors highlight the development of the moral self and underscore the significance of the relationship between identity development and the individual’s moral actions and by extension the significance of that relationship in moral consumption. Also, the paper adds to the current discussion on morality and ethical consumption by underscoring their interlinked nature and how that linkage can drive consumption behavior, highlight the cognitive processes involved in moral choices and how consumers reason to arrive at those choices. Finally, the authors provide examples of the workings of moral identity and reasoning in consumption contexts more directly.

Originality/value

Each of these morality and moral consumption domains of work provides unique insights into the moral consumption phenomenon; thus, it is important to disseminate the contributions made in each domain to better understand, why and how moral consumption works, what its ingredients are and how it may grow in the future. In this paper, the authors offer contemporary original samples of key contributions to each of these domains.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Melvin Prince, Attila Yaprak, Mark Cleveland, Mark A.P. Davies, Alexander Josiassen, Andrea Nechtelberger, Martin Nechtelberger, Dayananda Palihawadana, Walter Renner, Sona Chovanova Supekova and Sylvia Von Wallpach

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which personal values, moral foundations and gender-role identities affect, in sequence, consumers' constructions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which personal values, moral foundations and gender-role identities affect, in sequence, consumers' constructions of their ethnocentric and cosmopolitan orientations. Achieving a better understanding of the psychological makeup of consumer ethnocentrism and cosmopolitanism should help managers better design international market segmentation and brand positioning strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study's conceptual framework is anchored in attitude and values theories, and focuses on the social categorizations that consumers make and how these contribute to the formation of their ethnocentric and cosmopolitan orientations. Drawing data from consumers living in five European countries, we test our theoretical conjectures through structural equation modeling approaches, including multigroup analysis at the country level, as well as the identification and scrutiny of potential pan-European consumer segments.

Findings

Findings show that personal values, moral foundations and gender-role identities do exert direct and indirect (partially mediated) effects on the formation of consumers' ethnocentric and cosmopolitan orientations. These provide numerous insights for managers in terms of how they can segment domestic and international markets, as well as how to position products and communicate brand strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on consumers' personal and role identities and offers implications based on data gathered from a sample of five European countries. Future work should broaden this perspective by including other identity facets, such as religious and ethnic identities, as well as product-category and brand-specific outcomes, in order to help develop a more comprehensive picture of the psychology underpinning consumers' identity-related orientations, and their effects on consumer behavior. Future research should also study these issues in a broader geographical context, by including national markets that have culturally diverse populations as well as places with dissimilar cultural and economic profiles.

Originality/value

The study shows that individuals' personal values, moral foundations and gender roles have a strong effect on the formation of consumer ethnocentrism and consumer cosmopolitanism orientations. Consideration of how these antecedent constructs operate in concert to shape consumers' in- versus out-group orientations has been overlooked in the international marketing literature. Beyond the ramifications for theory, the study offers numerous substantive managerial implications in terms of how consumers are likely to respond to local and global/foreign products/brands based on these orientations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Abstract

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Hugh M. Cannon and Attila Yaprak

This chapter argues for the relative importance of marketing institutions in stimulating economic development in emerging (‘developing’ or ‘transition’) economies…

Abstract

This chapter argues for the relative importance of marketing institutions in stimulating economic development in emerging (‘developing’ or ‘transition’) economies. Furthermore, it argues that in situations where marketing institutions are allowed to freely operate, the particular institutions that are most important will depend on the stage of economic development. To illustrate, this paper develops an historical framework for understanding marketing development, providing a body of theory that will help society interpret current marketing events and prepare future managers and/or government policy makers to address the changing needs of the marketplace as economies develop. It then discusses the theory behind this framework and suggests a number of public policy implications for emerging economies.

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Gary A. Knight and Attila Yaprak

Increasing numbers of small and medium sized firms (SMEs) are becoming active in international business. This phenomenon is being facilitated by numerous trends in the…

Abstract

Increasing numbers of small and medium sized firms (SMEs) are becoming active in international business. This phenomenon is being facilitated by numerous trends in the macro-environment of the firm. However, SMEs are typically quite resource-constrained relative to their larger, traditional rivals. Many SMEs fail to bridge the gap between initial exporting efforts and ultimate success abroad. We propose a number of programs that governments can implement to help SMEs in overcoming the initial, challenging period of internationalization.

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

S. Tamer Cavusgil

Abstract

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Abstract

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Hugh M. Cannon and Attila Yaprak

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for better understanding of cross‐national segmentation under the underlying forces of globalization and technology.

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3051

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for better understanding of cross‐national segmentation under the underlying forces of globalization and technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is conceptual with illustrative examples, with a dynamic approach to cross‐national segmentation being considered.

Findings

Cross‐national segmentation can be better understood and better structured through closer examination of how segments evolve over time in response to the underlying forces of globalization and cultural evolution.

Research limitations/implications

The framework described in the paper should inspire research on value‐based segmentation schemes across markets.

Practical implications

International marketing managers should be able to construct and adapt segmentation strategies much more effectively through the use of the conceptual framework offered in the paper.

Originality/value

The framework offered in the paper is unique in that it blends consumer value orientations with product/service characteristics and functionally vs symbolically motivated segments and how these evolve over time.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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