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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Attila Chikán

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for connecting macro‐ and micro‐level research on competitiveness.

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3160

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for connecting macro‐ and micro‐level research on competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on some major international survey research reports (by the WEF, IMD, OECD, and the EU) and research experience, a gap is described between national and firm level competitiveness studies. A reasoning why filling this gap is discussed and a general research model connecting the two levels by using Porter's diamond model is developed.

Findings

By using appropriate definitions of national and firm competitiveness and the diamond model a meaningful connection of the two levels can be created, which is useful both for connecting recent research results and as a foundation for further research.

Research limitations/implications

Though the model is based on actual research experiences, its real value will become apparent after having it applied in concrete projects. This process is ongoing.

Practical implications

The model is a very useful tool in analysing real world situations, from economic policy issues to strategic management.

Originality/value

The paper is a result of extended research on competitiveness and provides a new model for further analyses in a very important field.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Attila Chikan

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518

Abstract

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Attila Chikán and Krisztina Demeter

Discusses those changes which can be observed at Hungarianmanufacturing companies in the transition process from planned to marketeconomies. The changes are illustrated…

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552

Abstract

Discusses those changes which can be observed at Hungarian manufacturing companies in the transition process from planned to market economies. The changes are illustrated with the results of a series of surveys, conducted in the framework of a research project on global manufacturing practices. Shows that the adjustment of Hungarian companies is rather fast, even though most of them still have a lot to do to be really competitive at the international level. Suggests that the processes which go on in the transition economies demonstrate the strength of those general “rules” which guide manufacturing management all over the world and which must be considered by all those who wish to be successful.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Attila Chikán

Summarizes the changes experienced in the field of logistics in Hungary, although most of the issues raised appear similarly in other transition economies in Central and…

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836

Abstract

Summarizes the changes experienced in the field of logistics in Hungary, although most of the issues raised appear similarly in other transition economies in Central and eastern Europe (CEE), typically in the Czech Republic and Poland. Discusses the immediate logistics consequences and company‐level responses. Consideration of the essence and nature of these changes is a necessity for those who want to understand the region or want to do business there.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Zita Zoltay Paprika, Agnes Wimmer and Richard Szanto

The purpose of this paper is to explore three key aspects of managerial decision making, namely managerial skills and attitudes, information and performance measurement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore three key aspects of managerial decision making, namely managerial skills and attitudes, information and performance measurement supporting decision making, and companies' approaches to the management of relationship with their stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

After giving a broad view of the management practice of the sample, the paper analyzes the differences (by company size, dominant ownership, and performance) of companies according to the routines and attitudes of decision making.

Findings

The findings of the research paper suggest that managerial capabilities and skills, and attitudes toward decision making, the information and performance measurement supporting decision making, and companies' approaches to the management of relationship with their stakeholders have a significant impact on the effectiveness of managerial decision making. All these factors play an important role in the competitiveness of the Hungarian companies.

Research limitations/implications

This research was based on a questionnaire. Further investigations would be necessary to check the results by interviews and case studies.

Practical implications

Beyond summarizing the main experiences, the paper draws up some recommendations for the business community reflecting on the successful companies' practice.

Originality/value

The three factors presented by the paper can constitute a possible framework of managerial decision making in further researches.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Ádám Török

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the development of export competitiveness of Hungary and other new member countries of the EU (NMEs) prior to their accession. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the development of export competitiveness of Hungary and other new member countries of the EU (NMEs) prior to their accession. It also makes a contribution to the methodology of competitiveness measurement. It links competitiveness analysis to so‐called eclectic trade theories trying to synthesise different approaches to comparative advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Introductory theoretical remarks are followed by a survey of various techniques to measure competitiveness. It defines “fields of competitiveness” in order to gauge Hungary's relative positions vis‐à‐vis her main export competitors. The analysis of export competitiveness of these countries in their main markets within the EU‐15 is based on market shares between 1996 and 2001.

Findings

The most advanced economies of the sample including Spain, Hungary, Slovenia and the Czech Republic showed a “neo‐technological” type of competitiveness development. The “Heckscher‐Ohlin” path based on cheap labour and mass technologies was followed by Portugal, Poland or Turkey for example. The “Ricardian” path with a great degree of reliance on natural resources could be observed in the case of Ukraine and Bulgaria.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to three fields of economics: the economics of transition, competitiveness analysis and trade theory. It proves that the catch‐up process of the NMEs brought about significant changes in their patterns of specialisation and competitiveness which is a feature of transition hitherto neglected by literature. Furthermore, it provides a proof to the so‐called eclectic model of trade theory introduced by Hirsch in the 1970s.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Robert Huggins and Hiro Izushi

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the way in which the knowledge competitiveness of regions is measured and further introduces the World Knowledge Competitiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the way in which the knowledge competitiveness of regions is measured and further introduces the World Knowledge Competitiveness Index (WKCI) benchmarking tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology consists of an econometric analysis of key indicators relating to the concept of knowledge competitiveness for 125 regions from across the globe consisting of 55 representatives from North America, 45 from Europe and 25 from Asia and Oceania.

Findings

The key to winning the super competitive race in the knowledge‐based economy is investment in the future: research and development, and education and training. It is found that the majority of the high‐performing regional economies in the USA have a knowledge competitive edge over their counterparts in Europe and Asia.

Research limitations/implications

To an extent, the research is limited by the availability of comparable indicators and metrics at the regional level that extend across the globe. Whilst comparative data are often accessible at the national level, regional data sources remain underdeveloped.

Practical implications

The WKCI has become internationally recognized as an important instrument for economic development policymakers and regional investment promotion agents as they create and refine their strategies and targets. In particular, it has provided a benchmark that allows regions to compare their knowledge competitiveness with other regions for around the world and not only their own nation or continent.

Originality/value

The WKCI is the first composite and relative measure of the knowledge competitiveness of the globe's best performing regions.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Harald Hagemann

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the high rates of economic growth of the US economy and the remarkable acceleration of productivity growth since the mid‐1990s…

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1027

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the high rates of economic growth of the US economy and the remarkable acceleration of productivity growth since the mid‐1990s which is widely attributed to the modern information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Design/methodology/approach

After identifying three key factors for Solow's productivity puzzle and examining ICTs as a general purpose technology, three main channels of ICTs' impact in the economy are discussed: the first transmission channel is direct and consists of the effects generated by rapid technical progress within the ICT‐capital goods producing sector. The second one is due to the increasing accumulation and application of ICT goods and services in the user sectors. ICTs' positive spillover effects comprise the third transmission channel, i.e. they lead to “disembodied” increases in efficiency in the sense of “learning by doing” in the end‐user sector.

Findings

The diffusion of ICTs requires investment in all industries, i.e. the improvement of competitiveness on the macro level is strongly linked to investment activities and skill qualifications on the micro level.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes with some comparisons between the US and the German economy where the acute need for infrastructure investment in East Germany in the 1990s limited the possibilities for investment in ICTs exactly at a time of high‐technological dynamism at the start of an upswing of a new Kondratieff cycle. Although some comparisons with the EU are made the impact of ICTs in other countries except the USA and Germany is not discussed more intensively.

Practical implications

A very useful source of information for graduate students and policy makers alike on the theoretical and empirical impact of new technologies on economic development.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an information need for comparing growth in international perspective.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Örjan Sölvell, Christian Ketels and Göran Lindqvist

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of regional concentration patterns within ten new European Union (EU) member states, EU10, and make comparisons with…

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1335

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of regional concentration patterns within ten new European Union (EU) member states, EU10, and make comparisons with EU15 and the US economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Industrial specialization and clusters are measured as employment in the intersection between a sector (three‐digit NACE data) and a particular region (NUTS 2 level), with a total of 38 sectors and 41 regions within EU10. Regional cluster size and degree of specialization is measured along 3D: absolute number of employees (>10,000 jobs is used as cut‐off for a regional cluster), degree of specialization (regional sector employment is at least two times expected levels) and degree of regional market labor dominance (>3 per cent of total employment in a particular sector). Each of these three measures of cluster size, specialization and labor market focus are classified with a “star”. The largest and most specialized clusters receive three stars.

Findings

EU10 exhibits 19 three‐star regional clusters, which display high values for each of the three measured parameters. In addition, there are 92 two‐star regional clusters and 313 one‐star regional clusters. The analysis also suggests that regional concentration in EU10 is clearly lower than in the USA, and slightly lower than in the old EU member states. In a few cases – IT, biopharmaceuticals and communications equipment – where the total size of the cluster is small, and there is little historical legacy in Eastern Europe, the EU10 exhibits higher geographical concentration than EU15.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the economies of EU10 exhibit a pattern of geographical concentration close to a random distribution, i.e. the process of regional concentration and redistribution of industry is in a very early phase. If Europe is to build a more competitive economy, industrial restructuring towards larger clusters must be allowed and pushed by policy makers both at the national and EU levels.

Practical implications

Policymakers must be well informed about geographical concentration patterns of industry. The research offers a consistent methodology of mapping regional clusters and geographical concentration patterns across sectors.

Originality/value

This paper is the first in measuring regional concentration patterns in Europe at this fine level, and is based on a new methodology developed by Professor Michael E. Porter at Harvard University. The paper has also introduced a new method of ranking clusters according to the star model.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Károly Balaton

The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategies of enterprises located in Hungary parallel with joining the European Union and to evaluate the preparation of firms…

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318

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategies of enterprises located in Hungary parallel with joining the European Union and to evaluate the preparation of firms for the competitive conditions within the EU.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a questionnaire survey including 301 enterprises. Top managers of medium sized and large enterprises answered the questions. Data were analysed by using mathematical and statistical methods, among them factor and cluster analysis. The paper discusses enterprise strategy by taking into account environmental conditions and internal characteristics of firms.

Findings

The paper deals with both content and process characteristics of strategies. Attention is devoted to issues like strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, research and development, corporate governance.

Research limitations/implications

Small enterprises are hardly represented in the sample. Emphasis is laid on the formalised systems of strategy development. Informal strategic processes are not analysed in detail.

Practical implications

The paper provides valuable information for evaluating the progress of Hungarian enterprises within the EU. Comparison with experiences in countries joining the EU parallel with Hungary may provide lessons for managers of Hungarian companies to improve their competitive position.

Originality/value

The paper relies on data from a large number of Hungarian enterprises. The conclusions may be useful for researchers interested in studying strategies of enterprises in transforming economies and also for practising managers in central and eastern Europe.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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