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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Mahtab Athari, Atsuyuki Naka and Abdullah Noman

This paper aims to achieve two main objectives. The first is to introduce a suitable adjustment to the conventional dividend-price ratio, which would address econometric…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to achieve two main objectives. The first is to introduce a suitable adjustment to the conventional dividend-price ratio, which would address econometric concerns and improve the predictability of the equity premium. The second is to compare the predictive performance of the newly introduced adjusted dividend-price ratio with the conventional dividend-price ratio.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors hypothesize that the adjusted dividend-price ratio will have better predictive power and forecasting quality for equity premium compared to the conventional dividend-price ratio. To test the hypothesis, the authors predict equity premium with both variables on a sample of 11 developed and emerging market indexes over a period spanning June 1995 to March 2017. To accommodate time variation in parameter values or structural breaks in the data, the authors conducted a fixed window rolling regressions using both variables. A variety of forecast techniques including magnitude and sign accuracy measures are applied to compare the performance of forecasts.

Findings

The adjusted dividend-price ratio is shown to be stationary and has both lower persistence and variability compared with the conventional dividend-price ratio. The authors find that the adjusted dividend-price ratio provides superior out-of-sample (OOS) performance compared to the conventional dividend-price ratio, for both size and sign accuracy, in forecasting equity premium for the majority of the countries in the sample.

Research limitations/implications

This paper introduces an easy-to-follow modification in the conventional dividend-price ratio that can be replicated by researchers and practitioners alike. However, the study has a limitation in that it does not capture the impact of dividend-paying firms within each index on the predictive ability of the adjusted dividend-price ratio.

Practical implications

The knowledge of equity premium predictability is important in implementing market-timing strategies and could be beneficial for portfolio and risk management. The newly introduced variable is easy to construct using widely available data without the need for complex econometric estimation. Investors can use this variable to predict equity premiums in international markets, both developed and emerging. The findings of this paper will be relevant to financial analysts, portfolio managers, investors and researchers in international finance. For example, by using the adjusted dividend-price ratio, investors would see up to 0.5% improvement in their OOS monthly forecasts of the equity premium.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that proposes adjustment in the conventional dividend-price ratio based on the past observations of the most recent quarter. In this way, the paper offers fresh insight that dividend-price ratio is still useful to predict equity premium albeit, after some adjustments and modifications. The findings of the paper would result in renewed interest in using the dividend-price ratio as a predictor of the equity premium.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Seungho Shin, Atsuyuki Naka and Saad Alsunbul

The purpose of this study is to examine how the volatility interruption (VI) mechanisms affect idiosyncratic volatilities in Korean stock markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how the volatility interruption (VI) mechanisms affect idiosyncratic volatilities in Korean stock markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Collecting the South Korea Stock Market (KOSPI) data from June 15, 2015 to March 31, 2019, we collect each residual,  εi,t, from three different estimated models: capital asset pricing model (CAPM), FF3 and FF5. To estimate the conditional idiosyncratic volatility, the authors employ two conditional time-varying measurements: GARCH and TGARCH.

Findings

The results show that the conditional idiosyncratic volatility increases when stock prices reach the upper and lower static limits, indicating the implementation of adopting static VI mechanism neither stabilize market conditions nor reduce excess volatility along with the existence of price limits.

Originality/value

Although market regulators and policymakers improve market conditions with the advanced VI mechanism, the empirical results show the adverse effect of the mechanism. Not allowing investors to earn above average returns without accepting above average risks makes Korean stock markets inefficient along with advanced VI mechanisms.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Oscar Varela and Atsuyuki Naka

This paper studies the exchange rate exposure of investments by the United States, Japan and Germany in the London International Stock Exchange (LSE) from 1982 to 1991…

Abstract

This paper studies the exchange rate exposure of investments by the United States, Japan and Germany in the London International Stock Exchange (LSE) from 1982 to 1991. Japanese and German investments are fully exposed to their own exchange rates, and the US is “supernominally” exposed to its own exchange rate. No significant changes in exposure are associated with the Plaza and Louvre Accords. The 1987 worldwide stock market crash exhibits a significant decrease in US exposure, and increase in German exposure. US, Japanese and German investments are also fully exposed to their own exchange rates for the periods before and after the 1986 “Big Bang” in London, except that US investments are “supernominally” exposed in the pre‐Big Bang period.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

M. Imtiaz Mazumder, Edward M. Miller and Atsuyuki Naka

The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictability of the US‐based international mutual fund returns by investigating 2,479 daily observations for all categories…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictability of the US‐based international mutual fund returns by investigating 2,479 daily observations for all categories of international equity, bond and hybrid mutual funds. Further, trading strategies are proposed and tested under different scenario including a proposed regulation by the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is split and the initial sub sample is used to investigate return patterns of international funds and to develop trading rules based on the predictable return patterns. Trading rules are then tested on the holdout sample.

Findings

Empirical results demonstrate statistically significant predictabilities. Various trading strategies show that the returns of both load and no‐load funds are economically significant beating a buy‐and‐hold strategy. Empirical findings are consistent across the fund categories irrespective of sizes and styles. The tested strategies are profitable even with various limits on frequency of trading, minimum holding periods and even under a recent SEC's proposed regulation. Further, possible contracting and regulatory changes are proposed to improve the efficiency in the mutual fund industry.

Originality/value

The results confirm previous findings of statistically and economically significant regularities from trading strategies that involve following the US markets. A test of SEC's proposed regulation documents that short‐term investors may benefit from active trading strategy even if the SEC's rule is implemented.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Abdullah Noman, Mohammad Nakibur Rahman and Atsuyuki Naka

This paper aims to uncover potential contemporaneous relationship between foreign portfolio investment (FPI) and another popular type of cross-border investment outflow…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover potential contemporaneous relationship between foreign portfolio investment (FPI) and another popular type of cross-border investment outflow, namely, foreign direct investment (FDI).

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship between FPI and FDI are modeled using simultaneous equations approach to take potential endogeneity in to account. In a panel of 45 countries over the period of 2001-2009, FPI and FDI are found to be strategically complimentary to each other.

Findings

The two-stage least square estimates suggest existence of both statistically and economically significant relationship between these two types of outflows. In particular, the FDI outflow has empirically significant predictive power in explaining the FPI outflow. Similarly, the FPI outflow also has significant explanatory power for the observed level of FDI outflow. Second, the FPI has greater explanatory power for FDI outflow than the FDI for the FPI outflow.

Originality/value

The authors believe that the paper would contribute to the relevant literature in terms of its originality and scope. The empirical findings of the paper have valuable policy implications.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

M. Kabir Hassan

Summarizes the net capital flows from industrial to developing/transitional countries 1970‐1996 and recent changes in their equity and bond markets; and identifies the…

Abstract

Summarizes the net capital flows from industrial to developing/transitional countries 1970‐1996 and recent changes in their equity and bond markets; and identifies the factors affecting these portfolio flows and risk/return behaviour in OIC stock markets. Uses monthly stock return data from ten OIC countries to demonstrate that despite their volatility they might offer opportunities for portfolio diversification; and uses cointegration methods to investigate the dynamic relationships between them. Discusses the causes of the Asian currency crisis and its impact on these stock marekts; and considers what trade and development policies OIC countries should adopt to improve their economies.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 29 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Rakesh Kumar Verma and Rohit Bansal

This paper aims to identify various macroeconomic variables that affect the stock market performance of developed and emerging economies. It also investigates the effect…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify various macroeconomic variables that affect the stock market performance of developed and emerging economies. It also investigates the effect of these factors on the stock markets of both economies. The impact of these variables on broad market indices and sectoral indices is investigated and compared too.

Design/methodology/approach

The publications for the study were retrieved from databases such as Emerald Insight, EBSCO, ScienceDirect and JSTOR using the keywords “Macroeconomic variables” and “Stock market” or “Stock market performance.” The result demonstrated a growing corpus of scholarly work in the domain of stock market. The study was carried out separately for each macroeconomic indicator. Given a large number of articles under consideration, the authors began by reading the titles and abstracts of all publications to identify those that were relevant. The papers are evaluated in Excel and the articles for review range from 1972 to 2021.

Findings

The authors found that gross domestic product (GDP), FDI (Foreign Direct Investment) and FII (Foreign Institutional Investment) have a positive effect on both emerging and developed economies’ stock market while gold price has a negative effect. Interest rates had a negative impact on both economies except for a few developing countries. The relationship with oil prices was positive for oil exporting countries while negative for oil importing countries. Inflation, money supply and GDP are the macroeconomic variables that have the same effect on sectoral indices as they do on broad market indices. The impact was sector-specific for the remaining variables.

Research limitations/implications

This paper gives an overview of relation and effect covering variety of macroeconomic variables and stock market indices. Still, there is a scope for further research to analyze the effect on thematic, strategy and sectoral indices. A longer time horizon with new variables, such as bank deposit growth rate, nonperforming assets of banks, consumer confidence index and investor sentiment, can be studied using high-frequency data. This research may help stakeholders adopt and manage their policies during a crisis or economic slump.

Practical implications

This study will assist investors, researchers and educators in the fields of economics and finance in understanding how macroeconomic factors affect the stock market. Furthermore, this study can guide in portfolio diversification strategy across multiple sectors by examining the impact of macroeconomic factors specific to sectoral indices. This paper provides insight into society and researchers since it integrates a number of macroeconomic variables and their interaction with the stock market. It may also help pension funds and mutual fund firms to hedge their funds and allocate equity portfolios.

Originality/value

With respect to India, this study looked at new macroeconomic variables and sectors. It contrasted the impact of these variables in developed and developing economies. The effect of broad and sectoral stock indexes was also investigated and compared. The authors examined how these variables responded during crisis and economic downturns by using articles from a longer time frame. This research also looked into how changing the frequency of data for the variables altered stock performance. This paper emphasized the need for more research into thematic, strategy and broad market indices, such as small-cap and mid-cap indices.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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