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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Yoon Jung Jang

This study aims to examine the impact of green atmospheric and communicative servicescape dimensions on customers’ emotional and behavioral outcomes and explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of green atmospheric and communicative servicescape dimensions on customers’ emotional and behavioral outcomes and explores the moderating effect of customer familiarity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from coffee shop customers in the USA. Structural equation modeling and a multigroup analysis were used for analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that the atmospheric dimensions of green coffee shops have a greater impact than communicative dimensions on customers’ green place attachment and loyalty. However, the effects of green servicescape depend on customer familiarity. The impact of the communicative servicescape on customers’ attachment and loyalty is significantly greater in a high-familiarity group than in a low-familiarity group.

Practical implications

The findings provide coffee shop managers with insights into effective design of a green service environment. Although managers focus on both dimensions, they may use customer familiarity as a segmenting or targeting tool in designing the green service environment and developing a sustained relationship with customers with different levels of familiarity.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing servicescape models by incorporating green place attachment as a construct to comprehend customers’ inner evaluations. It also contributes to the literature on attachment by demonstrating the clear linkage between both green servicescape dimensions and place attachment. This study highlights customer familiarity construct that should be a critical issue in advancing the understanding of customer behavior in the green servicescape context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Md Washim Raja, Sandip Anand and David Allan

Studying the role of advertising music (ad music) in a retail context can be an emergence of new marketing practices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

Studying the role of advertising music (ad music) in a retail context can be an emergence of new marketing practices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the potential usage and utility of ad music as an atmospheric stimulus in contrast to music (retail music) as an atmospheric stimulus. This paper also aims to provide a model, which depicts how ad music could be an alternative to retail music in retail settings with regard to consumers’ attitudinal influence and its optimistic correlation with related marketing outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviewed the literature related to the role of retail music as an atmospheric stimulus and studies related to the role of music in the ad.

Findings

Advertising music as an atmospheric stimulus is more likely to influence consumers’ attitude towards advertising music, towards advertising and towards the advertised brand. Contrary to retail music, advertising music as an atmospheric stimulus may help a consumer for ad recall, ad message/brand information recall, brand recall, brand identification and brand recognition. Consequently, advertising music may always have an advantage over retail music with regard to purchase intent, brand choice and financial return.

Practical implications

This work may encourage the advertisers for the proper usage of ad music as an atmospheric stimulus that may holistically magnify the saliency of advertising theoretically and practically.

Originality/value

This study is a novel attempt to conceptualise the potential scope of utilisation of ad music in the retail context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Gaurav Bhatt, Abhigyan Sarkar and Juhi Gahlot Sarkar

The majority of past studies on the physical store environment have focused on the impacts of distinct store environmental cues like music, crowding and décor on…

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of past studies on the physical store environment have focused on the impacts of distinct store environmental cues like music, crowding and décor on consumers' responses. However, recent research posits that consumer is more likely to experience several cues in a combination, rather than in isolation, i.e. different categories of store environmental cues are likely to impact consumer psychology holistically. Hence, our study aims to identify the relevant factors of store atmospheric cues impacting consumer's attitude in physical retail store context and validate scales to measure such factors.

Design/methodology/approach

This research develops and validates psychometrically reliable scales to measure two broad store stimuli factors namely: attractive and facilitating store stimuli, following the scale development method suggested by Churchill (1979).

Findings

The study shows that attractive store stimuli predict affective and sensory store brand experiences. The facilitating store stimuli moderate the effects of attractive store stimuli on affective and sensory store brand experiences. Affective and sensory store brand experiences predict store satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the existing body of store ambience research by empirically understanding the psychological mechanism through which customers perceive different store cues holistically leading to the elicitation of store satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Jennifer M. Mower, Minjeong Kim and Michelle L. Childs

To fill a gap in external atmospheric literature and provide useful information for small store retailers, this study aims to investigate the influence of external…

Abstract

Purpose

To fill a gap in external atmospheric literature and provide useful information for small store retailers, this study aims to investigate the influence of external atmospheric variables, specifically window displays and landscaping (i.e., accessory vegetation), on customers’ responses towards an apparel boutique.

Design/methodology/approach

The Stimulus‐Organism‐Response (S‐O‐R) model proposed by Mehrabian and Russell provided the theoretical framework. Data were collected from students enrolled at an American university. Univariate analyses and simple regression analyses were used to evaluate the influence of two external variables (window display and landscaping) on consumer responses in terms of liking, mood, and patronage intentions.

Findings

Results indicated that window display and landscaping had no main effects on pleasure or arousal. However, the presence of window display and landscaping influenced respondents’ liking of the store exterior and patronage intentions. Additionally, consumers’ liking of the store exterior and mood positively influenced patronage intentions.

Practical implications

Store retailers, especially small apparel boutiques, would benefit from landscaping the external portion of their store and pay special attention to their window displays.

Originality/value

Turley and Milliman stressed the pressing need for further empirical research on external atmospheric variables because of lack of research on exterior atmospheric variables. This study focused on external atmospheric variables and their impact on shopper behaviors and thus adds to the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2020

Vanessa Apaolaza, Patrick Hartmann, Cristobal Fernández-Robin and Diego Yáñez

This paper aims to examine the effects of natural plants on satisfaction and loyalty in the hospitality servicescape and provides a theoretical framework explaining the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of natural plants on satisfaction and loyalty in the hospitality servicescape and provides a theoretical framework explaining the underlying processes.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study (plants vs no-plants) was conducted in a restaurant with a sample of 119 individuals. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and bootstrapping moderated mediation analysis (Hayes, 2013).

Findings

The results of the study confirmed significant effects of indoor natural plants on consumers’ satisfaction and loyalty, mediated by the experiential value components of aesthetic value, service excellence and escapism. The absence of an interaction of these influences with consumers’ connectedness to nature indicates that the beneficial effects of indoor plants universally affect all individuals, independent of their personal degree of feeling connected with nature.

Practical implications

Indoor natural plants as ambient elements in restaurants can improve satisfaction and loyalty by enhancing the dimensions of aesthetics and escapism of the service experience, as well as the perception of service quality.

Originality/value

This is the first experimental study analyzing the effects of indoor plants on customer satisfaction and loyalty conducted in a real-life restaurant setting using actual plants. The findings contribute theoretically by providing an integrated conceptual model of the satisfaction and loyalty effects of atmospheric stimuli (i.e. plants) in the hospitality servicescape, which offers a process explanation based on the mediating influence of aesthetic value and the sequential mediations of aesthetic value → service excellence and aesthetic value → escapism.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Ana Vukadin, Apiradee Wongkitrungrueng and Nuttapol Assarut

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of artistic elements in a shopping mall’s experiential marketing strategy and the effects of artistic elements on customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of artistic elements in a shopping mall’s experiential marketing strategy and the effects of artistic elements on customer shopping value (e.g. utilitarian, hedonic and symbolic) and shopper response (e.g. satisfaction, behavioural intention).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 300 shoppers in a shopping mall in Bangkok, Thailand. A partial least square-structural equation model was used to examine the impact of the artistic elements along with other elements in the shopping mall on shopper response through perceived shopping value.

Findings

Empirical evidence shows that artistic elements in an artified mall have a positive effect on customer hedonic and symbolic value, which in turn leads to positive shopper response. Artistic elements perform better than other elements in predicting symbolic value.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that artistic elements should be considered a new source of mall differentiation and customer experience enhancement. Unique artistic elements add emotional and symbolic appeal to the mall, and mall managers should carefully choose artistic content that matches the position and target shoppers of their mall.

Originality/value

This paper proposed and empirically examined the effect of artistic elements as the new fourth atmospheric element. It extends the art infusion theory by applying it to the “non-luxury” shopping mall context to demonstrate the spillover effect of art on shopping value, which further influence shopper response.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Len Tiu Wright, Andrew Newman and Charles Dennis

Much of the literature on consumer empowerment focuses on consumers' efforts to regain control of their consumption processes from suppliers. The purpose is to argue that…

Abstract

Purpose

Much of the literature on consumer empowerment focuses on consumers' efforts to regain control of their consumption processes from suppliers. The purpose is to argue that many suppliers achieve success by trying hard to empower consumers. The mechanism by which this takes place consists of researching and providing what consumers want. Consumers feel empowered when they are able to enjoy the consumption process. This is of particular note in shopping, which is not simply obtaining products but also experience and enjoyment.

Design/methodology/approach

Research is examined into the links between firms' efforts to understand what consumers want, atmospheric stimuli, emotions and buying behaviour.

Findings

The paper finds that successful firms' try hard to understand what consumers want and to improve consumer satisfaction and empowerment by providing pleasant marketing environments and apt, relevant information.

Research limitations/implications

The approach is based on prior literature. The paper examines marketing to consumers in company locations, e.g. stores, malls, restaurants and banks to examine specific evidence of the effects of atmospheric stimuli such as aroma, music and video screen media.

Practical implications

The paper contends that firms can and do become successful in a competitive arena by providing pleasant environments and information that people want.

Originality/value

The paper shows how consumer empowerment is an important concept. This paper contributes since there is a dearth of writings specifically about consumer empowerment in the marketing literature. Far from the popular view of consumers being manipulated by firms, successful firms try hard to and succeed in empowering consumers in their marketing activities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Value of Design in Retail and Branding
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-580-6

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Fon Sim Ong, Kok Wei Khong, Ken Kyid Yeoh, Osman Syuhaily and Othman Mohd. Nor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of atmospherics and affective state on shoppers’ in-store behaviour using the two approaches in structural equation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of atmospherics and affective state on shoppers’ in-store behaviour using the two approaches in structural equation modelling (SEM), i.e. Frequentist and Bayesian approaches. Shoppers’ affective state was tested for its mediating effect on in-store shopping behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The final sample consists of 382 respondents who were drawn from shoppers at selected apparel stores in six of the most popular shopping malls around Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). A frequentist approach to SEM is common among researchers and offers generally an analysis of the relationships between multiple latent variables and constructs. Alternatively, the Bayesian SEM (BSEM) approach stems from the diffusion of the model’s posterior distributions using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. More specifically, this technique is inherently more flexible and substantive in determining parameter estimates as compared to the more conventional, the frequentist approach to SEM.

Findings

The results show the mixed effects of atmospheric cues in retail setting on shoppers’ affective state. More specifically, the positive direct effect of atmospheric cues (music) on in-store behaviour was confirmed while other atmospheric cues (colour and store layout) were found to be fully mediated by affective state. The Bayesian approach was able to offer more distinctive results complementing the frequentist approach.

Research limitations/implications

Although the current sample size is adequate, it will be interesting to examine how a bigger sample size and different antecedents of in-store behaviour in retailing can affect the comparison between the frequentist approach in SEM and BSEM.

Practical implications

The authors found that a combination of well-designed store atmospherics and layout store can produce pleasurable effects on shoppers resulting in positive affective state. This study found that results from both frequentist and Bayesian approaches complement each other and it may be beneficial for future studies to utilise both approaches in SEM.

Originality/value

This paper met the aim to compare the approaches in SEM and the need to consider both approaches on in-store shopping environment. Overall, the authors contend that the Bayesian approach to SEM is a potentially viable alternative to frequentist SEM, especially when studies are conducted under dynamic conditions such as apparel retailing.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Ebrahim Mazaheri, Marie‐Odile Richard and Michel Laroche

The main objective of this paper is to compare consumers' online shopping behavior across three types of services (i.e. search, experience, and credence). Reviewing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this paper is to compare consumers' online shopping behavior across three types of services (i.e. search, experience, and credence). Reviewing the marketing and psychology literatures, this study aims to propose that consumers' emotions (pleasure, arousal, and dominance) influence their perception of site atmospheric cues (site informativeness, effectiveness, and entertainment), which, in turn, impact consumers' site attitudes, site involvement, and purchase intention. It also aims to test the proposed model for three major types of services (i.e. search, experience, and credence) and to compare the path coefficients of all the relationships in the model across the three groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Lab experiments were conducted for data collection and structural equation modeling was utilized for multi‐group analysis.

Findings

The results supported the proposed model and revealed several non‐invariant structural paths across the three groups.

Research limitations/implications

The student sample may not represent the general population.

Practical implications

Search‐, experience‐, and credence‐based services should attempt to evoke the most desired consumer emotional types (pleasure, arousal, and dominance).

Originality/value

Unlike many other studies in services marketing, this paper tests the proposed model across different service types to increase the generalizability of the results.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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