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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Julie Anna Guidry

Respondents’ comments to the LibQUAL+™ spring 2001 survey were examined to refine the instrument and reduce non‐sampling error. Using qualitative data analysis software,

Abstract

Respondents’ comments to the LibQUAL+™ spring 2001 survey were examined to refine the instrument and reduce non‐sampling error. Using qualitative data analysis software, Atlas.ti, respondents’ unsolicited e‐mail messages were analyzed. Results showed that the major problem with the survey was its length, which was due to a combination of factors. This information helped the survey designers in reducing the number of library service quality items from 56 to 25 and in addressing technical problems from the Web‐based survey. An in‐depth discussion of the steps followed in conducting the Atlas.ti analysis will also be discussed.

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Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2006

Joan Stenson

This paper presents the major findings of recently completed research in the UK concerning the attributes of information as an asset and its impact on organisational…

Abstract

This paper presents the major findings of recently completed research in the UK concerning the attributes of information as an asset and its impact on organisational performance. The research study employed an automated information asset- and attribute-scoring grid exercise and semi-structured open-ended interviews with 45 senior UK managers in four case study organisations. The information asset-scoring grid was developed to provide a simple visual representation of information assets and attributes using Excel charts. The semi-structured open-ended interviews aimed to identify the attributes of information assets considered significant by 45 senior UK managers and to explore relevant issues such as the value of information and organisational effectiveness.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-403-4

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Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Sonja Mackenzie

Purpose: This paper presents an exploratory analysis of minority stress and resiliency processes among parents in LGBTQ families. The paper examines two unique minority…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper presents an exploratory analysis of minority stress and resiliency processes among parents in LGBTQ families. The paper examines two unique minority stress processes – (1) parents experiencing sexual and/or gender minority stress due to the stigmatization of their own identities as individuals and (2) parents sharing the gender minority stress faced by their transgender and gender expansive (TGE) child, and in the context of their parent–child relationship.

Methodology: Between 2017 and 2018 in-depth, in-person qualitative interviews on the topics of gender, stress, and resilience were conducted with 12 parents in LGBTQ families. Audio recordings were transcribed and then open coded using ATLAS.ti qualitative data analysis software. Analyses of data were informed by critical intersectional theories that locate gender and sexuality within structures of social and racial oppression.

Findings: Interview data indicate that minority stress is experienced by parents experiencing sexual and/or gender minority stress due to the stigmatization of their own identities, as well as among parents sharing the gender minority stress faced by their TGE child in the context of their parent–child relationship. Parents described community resilience and minority coping through interpersonal, community, and institutional support. This paper provides evidence that sexual and gender minority stressors are enhanced and resiliency factors are reduced among those experiencing racism and economic disadvantage.

Research limitations: This is an exploratory study conducted with a small sample of parents in a specific geographic area.

Originality/Value: These data provide initial evidence to support further analyses of the dyadic minority stressors within parent–child relationships in LGBTQ families

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Gerba Leta, Till Stellmacher, Girma Kelboro, Kristof Van Assche and Anna-Katharina Hornidge

Ethiopia operates a large agricultural extension service system. However, access to extension-related knowledge, technologies and agricultural inputs is unequally…

Abstract

Purpose

Ethiopia operates a large agricultural extension service system. However, access to extension-related knowledge, technologies and agricultural inputs is unequally distributed among smallholder farmers. Social learning is widely practiced by most farmers to cope with this unequal distribution though its practices have hardly been documented in passing on knowledge of agriculture and rural development or embedding it into the local system of knowledge production, transfer and use. The purpose of this study is, therefore, to identify the different methods of social learning, as well as their contribution to the adoption and diffusion of technologies within Ethiopia’s smallholder agricultural setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used, comprising farmer and expert interviews, focus group discussions, informal individual discussions and key informant interviews. The data were documented, coded and later analyzed using SPSS and ATLAS.ti.

Findings

The findings showed that 55 per cent of the farmers in the studied areas fully relied on social, community-level learning to adopt agricultural technologies, while 35 per cent of them relied on social learning only partly. Farmers acquired knowledge through social networks by means of communication, observation, collective labor groups, public meetings, socio-cultural events and group socialization. Informal institutions such as iddir, debo and dado, helped farmers learn, adopt and diffuse technologies.

Originality/value

This study used the concept of epistemic oppression by Dotson (2014) as a conceptual framework to examine farmers’ access to extension services and to analyze how informal institutions serve as workplace learning for the smallholder farmers. The authors suggest community-level social learning serves as a coping mechanism against the prevailing limitations of the formal extension system, and at the same time, it guards against the deepening of social, political and epistemic inequalities that are inherent to the knowledge system.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Abstract

Purpose

To explore people’s attitudes towards bus service quality and bus use.

Methodology/approach

The study is a natural experiment that uses primary data collected from questionnaires, which were conducted to Maltese residents. The information was collected two months before the bus service reform and one year afterwards.

Findings

Results cast doubt on whether current policy measures regarding bus service quality are adequate to contribute to a modal shift from car to bus use.

Practical implications

Provides insight on whether current policy measures are sufficient in order to obtain an increase in bus patronage.

Originality/value

The case study of the Malta bus service reform provides an opportunity to study people’s attitudes in a quasi-experimental situation. Additionally, the research sheds light on the possible impact that bus service reforms have on people’s attitudes.

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Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Orly Shapira‐Lishchinsky

This study attempts to describe mentors' perceptions of their ethical dilemmas, the derived mentor roles, and the ethical guidelines suggested by mentors, with reference…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to describe mentors' perceptions of their ethical dilemmas, the derived mentor roles, and the ethical guidelines suggested by mentors, with reference to previous studies exploring the mentors' multifaceted roles.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 60 mentors participated in a two‐phase study: the mentors were asked to submit descriptions of their ethical dilemmas to the study web site, and submissions were then discussed in focus groups. A four‐stage coding process derived from grounded theory was utilized.

Findings

The findings were grouped by means of the ATLAS.ti 5.0 into five main categories: discretion, caring, accountability, autonomy, and distributive justice. The findings raise three important issues: first, mentors perceive their role mainly as empowering their mentees and perceive their powerlessness as being due to lack of tools for dealing with ethical dilemmas. Second, most mentors' ethical dilemmas involved conflicts with school principals. Third, a large number of mentor roles and several of the derived ethical guidelines are unique to the mentoring situation.

Practical implications

The findings may promote the design of an educational program for mentors that will relate to the ethical aspects of mentoring. Such programs call for the participation of school principals in program development and meetings to help mentors deal with their ethical dilemmas.

Originality/value

While previous studies in mentoring focused on defining mentoring, describing mentors' roles, and suggesting how to build effective mentoring, no study focused on the ethical aspects of mentoring. This study describes mentors' ethical dilemmas, and the unique ethical guidelines that emerged.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

B. Jane Scales

The purpose of this paper is to review the basic principles of qualitative analysis, and examine the practical application of these principles to analyze student…

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2463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the basic principles of qualitative analysis, and examine the practical application of these principles to analyze student assignments using the ATLAS.ti software.

Design/methodology/approach

Student comments from an assignment are prepared for import into ATLAS.ti. The comments are coded, and then analyzed for patterns using ATLAS.ti and its mechanisms for exploring data and data patterns.

Findings

ATLAS.ti offers myriad analytic tools that allow the researcher to quantify qualitative information through coding, data query, cross‐tabulation, and networked visualization of project design. By developing both technical expertise with the software, and developing familiarity with qualitative methodology, librarians can wield an effective means to assess and evaluate text‐based data, such as student assignments or surveys.

Research limitations/implications

Because the ATLAS.ti software, and the qualitative analysis process itself is so complex, this article can only outline the most prominent aspects of the tool.

Practical implications

The document can serve as a “jumping‐off” point for other researchers wishing to either explore the qualitative analysis process, particularly as conducted with ATLAS.ti. The reader will become more familiar with the basic concepts of qualitative analysis as reflected in the organization and functions of the ATLAS.ti, as well as the process of preparing and analyzing textual information with ATLAS.ti.

Originality/value

Because there is a general lack of literature on setting up a project with the software, the article is potentially valuable to anyone wishing to expand and improve their evaluative skills using ATLAS.ti or similar tools.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Anne Laajalahti

Recently, ethical leadership has become a widely studied research topic. Simultaneously, many studies have begun to emphasise the role of interpersonal communication…

Abstract

Recently, ethical leadership has become a widely studied research topic. Simultaneously, many studies have begun to emphasise the role of interpersonal communication competence (ICC) in successful leadership. However, there has been little discussion on the links between ethical leadership and leaders’ ICC. To address this research gap, this study aims to compare and combine the research traditions of ethical leadership and leaders’ ICC. The study is based on two literature reviews examining (a) ethical leadership (substudy 1; N = 27) and (b) leaders’ ICC (substudy 2; N = 18). The research questions are as follows: (a) How are the requirements of leaders’ ICC noticed in the literature of ethical leadership? (substudy 1) (b) How are the requirements of ethical leadership noticed in the literature of leaders’ ICC? (substudy 2) The findings reveal that (a) studies in ethical leadership rarely pay attention to leaders’ ICC and (b) studies in leaders’ ICC do not often discuss ethical aspects of ICC, at least explicitly. While a larger sample would have been preferred, the study contributes to previous research by addressing a research gap between ethical leadership and leaders’ ICC and suggests integrating these research traditions to better understand the nature of ethics and ICC in leadership. By promoting novel interdisciplinary research perspectives, the study provides a foundation for further research and development of (a) a competence-based approach to ethical leadership and (b) an ethics-focused approach to competent leadership communication.

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Article
Publication date: 13 December 2018

Ahmad Aljarah, Lawrence Emeagwali, Blend Ibrahim and Bashar Ababneh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on customer relationship quality (RQ) based on three main aspects of RQ…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on customer relationship quality (RQ) based on three main aspects of RQ, namely, satisfaction, trust and commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative meta-analysis of 80 unique effect sizes reported in 60 articles (n = 27,805) was conducted to determine effect sizes of the relationship between CSR and the aspects of RQ of the customer. Furthermore, the economic development has been examined as potential moderators between CSR and RQ.

Findings

Meta-analysis suggests that a positive relationship between CSR and the three studied aspects of RQ is well established; however, the strength of studied relationships has revealed variations in magnitude. Customer commitment was affected by CSR (r = 56) the most, closely followed by customer trust (r = 0.52), while customer satisfaction (r = 0.44) was affected the least. Moreover, the result of meta-regression shows that the economic development moderates only one relationship, CSR and trust.

Originality/value

Presenting a summary of the direction of primary research on the relationship between CSR and RQ, as no prior meta-analysis on the primary relationship has been conducted till date (to the best of the authors’ knowledge).

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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