Search results

1 – 10 of 74
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Nik Thompson, Atif Ahmad and Sean Maynard

It is a widely held belief that users make a rational cost-benefit decision when choosing whether to disclose information online. Yet, in the privacy context, the evidence…

Abstract

Purpose

It is a widely held belief that users make a rational cost-benefit decision when choosing whether to disclose information online. Yet, in the privacy context, the evidence is far from conclusive suggesting that strong and as-yet unmeasured influences on behaviour may exist. This paper aims to demonstrate one such link – the effect of internet addiction on information disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 216 Web users was collected regarding their perceptions on privacy and information disclosure intentions as well as avoidance behaviour, an element of internet addiction. Using a research model based on the Privacy Calculus theory, structural equation modelling was applied to quantify the determinants of online disclosure under various conditions.

Findings

The authors show that not all aspects of privacy (a multi-dimensional construct) influence information disclosure. While concerns about data collection influence self-disclosure behaviour, the level of awareness about privacy does not. They next examine the impact of internet addiction on these relationships, finding that internet addiction weakens the influence of privacy concerns to the point of non-significance.

Originality/value

The authors highlight some of the influences of self-disclosure behaviour, showing that some but not all aspects of privacy are influential. They also demonstrate that there are powerful influences on user behaviour that have not been accounted for in prior work; internet addiction is one of these factors. This provides some of the first evidence of the potentially deleterious effect of internet addiction on the privacy calculus.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Atif Ahmad and Sean Maynard

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, design, delivery and evaluation of a postgraduate information security subject that focuses on a managerial…

2412

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, design, delivery and evaluation of a postgraduate information security subject that focuses on a managerial, rather than the more frequently reported technical perspective. The authors aimed to create an atmosphere of intellectual excitement and discovery so that students felt empowered by new ideas, tools and techniques and realized the potential value of what they were learning in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops fundamental principles and arguments that inform the design and development of the teaching curriculum. The curriculum is aimed at security management professionals in general and consultants in particular. The paper explains the teaching method in detail including the specific topics of lectures, representative reading material, assessment tasks and feedback mechanisms. Finally, lessons learned by the authors and their conclusions are presented as a form of reflection.

Findings

The instructors recognized four key factors that played a role in the atmosphere of intellectual excitement and motivation. These were new concepts and ideas, an increased level of engagement, opportunities for students to make their own discoveries and knowledge presented in a practical context. Maintaining a high quality of teaching resources, catering for diverse student needs and incorporating learning cycles of assessment in a short period of time were additional challenges.

Originality/value

Most “information security” curricula described in research literature take a technology-oriented perspective. This paper presents a much-needed management point of view. The teaching curriculum (including assessment tasks) and experiences will be useful to existing and future teaching and research academics in “information security management”. Those interested in developing their own teaching material will benefit from the discussion on potential topic areas, choice of assessment tasks and selection of recommended reading material.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Piya Shedden, Rens Scheepers, Wally Smith and Atif Ahmad

Many methodologies exist to assess the security risks associated with unauthorized leakage, modification and interruption of information used by organisations. This paper

2047

Abstract

Purpose

Many methodologies exist to assess the security risks associated with unauthorized leakage, modification and interruption of information used by organisations. This paper argues that these methodologies have a traditional orientation towards the identification and assessment of technical information assets. This obscures key risks associated with the cultivation and deployment of organisational knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to explore how security risk assessment methods can more effectively identify and treat the knowledge associated with business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument was developed through an illustrative case study in which a well‐documented traditional methodology is applied to a complex data backup process. Follow‐up interviews were conducted with the organisation's security managers to explore the results of the assessment and the nature of knowledge “assets” within a business process.

Findings

It was discovered that the backup process depended, in subtle and often informal ways, on tacit knowledge to sustain operational complexity, handle exceptions and make frequent interventions. Although typical information security methodologies identify people as critical assets, this study suggests a new approach might draw on more detailed accounts of individual knowledge, collective knowledge and their relationship to organisational processes.

Originality/value

Drawing on the knowledge management literature, the paper suggests mechanisms to incorporate these knowledge‐based considerations into the scope of information security risk methodologies. A knowledge protection model is presented as a result of this research. This model outlines ways in which organisations can effectively identify and treat risks around process knowledge critical to the business.

Details

VINE, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Muhammad Azeem, Sania Aziz, Jawad Shahid, Aamir Hayat, Munir Ahmed and Muhammad Imran Khan

In a modern business scenario, firms have implemented customer-centric approaches to enable customer relationship management (CRM) to trigger business excellence. Business…

Abstract

Purpose

In a modern business scenario, firms have implemented customer-centric approaches to enable customer relationship management (CRM) to trigger business excellence. Business strategies are modernizing business marketing operations that mainly focused on the retention of profitable customers. The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the impact of marketing strategies (MS), information technology support (IT-S) and knowledge sharing (KS) in the effect of CRM in the pharmaceutical sector of Punjab, Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the field force of national and international pharmaceuticals companies (N = 263) through a convenience sampling technique. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to examine data in SmartPLS 3.2.6.

Findings

The results indicated that IT-S and KS mediate the relationship between MS and CRM. More specifically, MS positively develops CRM through IT-S and KS.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the existing literature of pharmaceuticals by disclosing the field-force (medical representatives) specific role in developing CRM performance between pharmaceuticals firms and health-care physicians that are mainly based on knowledge advancement and influence these firms to adopt customer-centric business approaches to gain a competitive advantage to drive firm profitability.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Atif Saleem Butt and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to understand conflicts that emerge between managers of buying and supplying firms when a personal relationship (friendship, etc.) is present…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand conflicts that emerge between managers of buying and supplying firms when a personal relationship (friendship, etc.) is present between them in the supply chain context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a case study methodology and relies on data obtained from 30 qualitative interviews with managers of buying and supplying firms, having a personal relationship within inter-firm relationships to promote the interest of the firm.

Findings

Results from this study reveal conflicts between managers of buying and supplying firms due to the presence of a personal relationship between them. Specifically, results suggest that managers face ego conflict, supplier’s selection conflict and conflict on accepting late deliveries when they rely on personal relationships, which are themselves embedded within inter-firm relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, this study examines behavioural patterns in Australian cultural context. Second, results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings to understand conflicts, which arise between managers of buying and supplying firms, as a result of a personal relationship between them in the supply chain.

Originality/value

This is, perhaps, the first study contributing to the supply chain relationship literature by unveiling conflicts between managers of buying and supplying firms, when a personal relationship is present between them.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad, Bangcheng Liu and Atif Saleem Butt

The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardized, psychometrically sound instrument for the emerging construct of change recipient proactivity (CRP), using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardized, psychometrically sound instrument for the emerging construct of change recipient proactivity (CRP), using a deductive approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic item-development framework as a guide (i.e. item generation, questionnaire administration, item reduction and scale evaluation) and based on a sample of 414 white-collar employees, this paper discusses the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to measure change recipient’s proactive behavioral responses to planned change efforts.

Findings

Results suggest that our proposed CRP scale is internally consistent (reliable) and valid in that it is conceptually distinct from, yet empirically correlated with neighboring constructs such as affective commitment to change, readiness for change and proactive personality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings illustrate that change recipients can demonstrate proactive behaviors in response to change efforts. However, this study’s contribution is only a first step, requiring further theoretical and methodological refinement of the scale in different contexts.

Originality/value

The deductive nature of our study resulted in a comprehensive and domain-specific scale assessing recipients’ proactive responses to organizational change efforts. This opens doors to empirical studies on examining the conditions under which change recipients “may” step outside the boundaries of passivity to respond positively and proactivity to organizational change efforts.

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Atif Saleem Butt, Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad and Syed Hamad Hassan Shah

This paper aims to explore the role of personal relationships (friendships) in mitigating knowledge hiding behaviour between managers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of personal relationships (friendships) in mitigating knowledge hiding behaviour between managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a phenomenological methodology by studying seven UAE-based firms. Furthermore, 30 semi-structured (15 dyadic) interviews with senior managers are undertaken. The senior managers were chosen from multiple industries including plastic, frozen food, logistics, etc.

Findings

Based on 30 semi-structured interviews and comprehensive data analysis, results reveal that the development of personal relationships between managers results in higher interpersonal trust, mutual loyalty, higher cooperation, strong mutual goals and cultivation of reciprocity. The result further states that these factors diminish knowledge hiding behaviour between them.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, this study explores behavioural patterns concerning the United Arab Emirates culture only. Second, the results presented in this study should be quantitatively tested to demonstrate their generalizability.

Practical implications

Firms can use this study’s findings to understand how and why personal relationships between managers within firms diminish knowledge hiding behaviour.

Originality/value

There is a dire need for research exploring how knowledge hiding can be mitigated in firms. This paper addresses this gap by exploring the role of personal relationships in the knowledge hiding literature.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Atif Saleem Butt and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how firms can mitigate knowledge hiding behavior among their managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how firms can mitigate knowledge hiding behavior among their managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a multiple case study methodology by studying nine UAE based firms. Furthermore, 26 semi-structured interviews with senior managers are undertaken.

Findings

Based on the qualitative interviews and comprehensive data analysis, results unveil six strategies that firms can opt for in order to mitigate knowledge hiding behavior among managers (reducing chain of command, developing informal interaction among managers, introducing and implementing incentive policy, initiating easy performance appraisal, encouraging higher interdependency among managers and introducing open space work stations).

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioral patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only. Second, the results presented in this study should be tested.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings from this study to understand strategies that can help them to mitigate the knowledge hiding behavior of managers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge hiding literature by revealing strategies, which discourages knowledge hiding behavior in firms.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Atif Saleem Butt, Syed Hamad Hassan Shah and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge hiding affects buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge hiding affects buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multiple case study methodology. Overall, 26 semi-structured interviews (13 dyadic interviews) with managers of buying and supplying firms (who have been a victim of knowledge hiding) were undertaken.

Findings

Based on comprehensive data analysis, results reveal seven factors that adversely affect buyer-supplier relationship performance (lack of trust, lack of cooperation and lack of commitment). In addition, results reveal that such factors reduced the firm’s business performance in terms of low-quality products, increased lead time and higher costs.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioral patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings from this study to understand how knowledge hiding in a buyer-supplier relationship adversely affects a buyer-supplier relationship performance.

Originality/value

A considerable weakness in buyer-supplier relationship literature is a need for a study examining how knowledge hiding harms buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain. This paper addresses this gap.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Atif Saleem Butt and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of top-down knowledge hiding in buying and supplying firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of top-down knowledge hiding in buying and supplying firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multiple case study methodology by considering four UAE-based firms and further employing 20 semi-structured interviews with managers of buying and supplying firms having a local and foreign nationality.

Findings

Based on the qualitative interviews, senior managers were found to be intentionally hiding knowledge from their managers based on five individual, three interpersonal and two firm-level reasons.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioural patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings of this study to understand what really motivates senior managers to intentionally hide knowledge from their subordinates. Also, this study provides some constructive guidelines to firms/senior management, which can discourage the culture of knowledge hiding in firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge management literature by revealing multi-level and multi-faceted antecedents of top-down knowledge hiding in buying and supplying firms in the supply chain context.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 10 of 74