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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Gallus Bischof, Nikolaus Lange, Hans Juergen Rumpf and Ulrich W. Preuss

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the scientific evidence for reduced drinking in alcohol use disorders. While the aim of alcohol use disorders (AUD…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the scientific evidence for reduced drinking in alcohol use disorders. While the aim of alcohol use disorders (AUD) treatment usually focuses on abstinence, only a minority of individuals with AUD enter treatment. Lack of alternative treatment goals, including reduced drinking instead of abstinence, have been identified as a potential barrier for treatment entry. Epidemiological and treatment outcome studies reveal that a large proportion of individuals with AUD are able to substantially reduce their alcohol intake for a prolonged duration of time.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review of the literature on prevalence rates and health effects as well as evidence-based approaches fostering reduced drinking in individuals with AUD is presented.

Findings

Reduced drinking is associated with improvements in both morbidity and mortality. Research has identified evidence-based psychosocial and pharmacological treatment approaches; however, implementation is still scarce.

Originality/value

Target groups for interventions fostering drinking reduction instead of abstinence are defined and desiderata for further research are outlined.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Constance L Coogle and Myra G Owens

In recent years, Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) has become increasingly available to older adults who engage in at-risk drinking behaviors. The results of SBI…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) has become increasingly available to older adults who engage in at-risk drinking behaviors. The results of SBI training sessions that targeted hospital-based healthcare providers, as well as mental health service providers in community-based clinics, are reported. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 93 participants attended SBI active learning training sessions. The responses of physicians/physicians in training about their intentions to apply the information in professional practice and their willingness to recommend the training to others in their profession were compared to practitioners in other professions.

Findings

Although there were no differences in terms of commitment to apply the information or level of comfort using the techniques, physicians/physicians in training were less interested in promoting the SBI training among their colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited with respect to the number of training participants engaged and the geography entailed, yet implications for addressing barriers to widespread implementation and training challenges are explored.

Practical implications

Although it may be more difficult to promote SBI training in locations that do not primarily provide mental health services, hospitals, and other primary care settings are precisely where training may be most useful.

Social implications

The importance of training approaches to SBI that are disseminated within the context of a public health model of clinical preventive services is highlighted.

Originality/value

Original research is presented to highlight the need to improve training receptivity and facilitate the translation into practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Sally Marlow, Daniel Stahl and Gail Gilchrist

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the factors related to women’s ability to achieve and maintain abstinence from alcohol.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the factors related to women’s ability to achieve and maintain abstinence from alcohol.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid evidence assessment was carried out in four stages: definitions and research questions were agreed, search and selection were completed, data were extracted, quality of studies was assessed, and findings were synthesised and presented.

Findings

Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ASSIA were searched for cohort studies published in English during January 2000–February 2015. Expanded search terms for Women, Alcohol and Abstinence, and Cohort were used to identify relevant studies for inclusion, resulting in 1,040 records. Of these, 32 manuscripts from 31 studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. Alcohol-related factors such as increased quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption were related to lower likelihood of achieving and maintaining abstinence; treatment factors such as type of treatment and number of treatment episodes were related to higher and lower likelihood; demographic factors such as financial problems and poor housing status were related to lower likelihood; and psychological factors such as craving, other drug use and comorbid health problems were linked to lower likelihood.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time the factors related to the specific outcome of abstinence in women have been synthesised. Many of the factors found are also known to contribute to vulnerability for developing alcohol problems. The review revealed the paucity of studies with female only samples, or where results for women were reported separately.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Celia Wilkinson, Kim Clarke, Ros Sambell, Julie Dare and Stephen Jason Bright

Rates of drinking- and alcohol-related harms among older adults are increasing in most developed nations. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationship among…

Abstract

Purpose

Rates of drinking- and alcohol-related harms among older adults are increasing in most developed nations. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationship among at-risk alcohol use, smoking, gender, geographical location, self-reported health and psychological well-being among Western Australians aged 65 years and older.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary analysis was conducted of a cross-sectional survey that collected data from 7,804 West Australians aged 65 years and older between 2013 and 2015. Participants were categorised according to the following age groups: young-old (aged 65–74 years), older-old (aged 75–84 years) and oldest-old (aged 85+ years).

Findings

Results from a multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that at-risk drinking decreased with increasing age. Current smokers, males and those males and females who perceived their health to be “excellent” were more likely to report at-risk drinking, as were the oldest-old males who lived in remote communities. Psychological well-being was not a predictor of at-risk drinking

Originality/value

This paper examines drinking behaviour among a diverse population of older Western Australians. The way in which the age groups were segmented is unique, as most studies of older Australian drinking patterns aggregate the older adult population. Some of the authors’ findings support existing literature, whereas the remainder provides unique data about the relationship among at-risk drinking, geographic location and psychological well-being.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Jeremy D. Davey, Patricia L. Obst and Mary C. Sheehan

This study examined aspects of the work environment, which may impact on individual police officers’ risk of harm from alcohol consumption. A self report survey containing…

Abstract

This study examined aspects of the work environment, which may impact on individual police officers’ risk of harm from alcohol consumption. A self report survey containing demographic questions, the AUDIT and questions relating to perceived control over the job, overtime, pressure, boredom and job satisfaction was completed by 67 per cent of officers in an Australian state police service. The results of the current study indicate that gender, age and marital status, are individual risk factors for problem drinking, as has been shown in previous research. Within the policing context, years of service, job satisfaction, perceived control within the job and being an operational officer, also emerged as significant predictors of at risk alcohol consumption patterns. Findings further suggest that there is a strong norm of drinking at work or after a shift, which suggests a culture of acceptance of drinking within the workplace. This acceptance is strongly predictive of both risk of alcohol dependency and negative consequences from drinking within the police service. This study suggests directions for future research, which may lead to the introduction of informed interventions within the police service that could reduce officers’ risk of harm from alcohol consumption.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Rahul Tony Rao

The purpose of this paper is to detail developments in UK alcohol policy for older people over the past 20 years, based on evidence for a growing public health problem…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to detail developments in UK alcohol policy for older people over the past 20 years, based on evidence for a growing public health problem with alcohol misuse in older people.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was carried out using health and social care databases, including grey literature.

Findings

There has been considerable progress in areas such as screening and brief intervention, low-risk drinking and service provision for integrated care in older people with dual diagnosis.

Research limitations/implications

There remains a dearth of research and policy for older people with alcohol misuse and dual diagnosis prior to 2011. Although there remains limited empirical evidence for public health interventions to improve health outcomes from alcohol-related harm, improvements in population health from implementation of recent policy changes and intervention programmes remains to be seen.

Practical implications

This review has implications for best practice in the provision of integrated care to reduce harm and improve health and social outcomes in older people with alcohol misuse and dual diagnosis.

Originality/value

This review draws together a large area of research and policy on alcohol misuse in older people that has the potential to improve public mental health for older people who are at risk of alcohol-related harm.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sandra C. Jones, Simone Pettigrew, Nicole Biagioni, Mike Daube, Tanya Chikritzhs, Julia Stafford and Julien Tran

There is a growing body of research into the utilisation of social networking sites (SNS) by alcohol marketers, but less research into how young people utilise SNS to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing body of research into the utilisation of social networking sites (SNS) by alcohol marketers, but less research into how young people utilise SNS to create their own meanings of, and interactions with, alcohol. The purpose of this study was to explore young adults’ perceptions of the nexus between alcohol and SNS.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 60 adults aged 18-21 years took part in an intensive data collection process over six months. All references to social media in the interviews, focus groups and written introspections were compiled and analysed.

Findings

Results showed social media use stimulates alcohol consumption and alcohol consumption stimulates social media use. Four main themes emerged: social engagement, identity, drinking culture and distancing. Participants reported being constantly exposed to, and often influenced by, images of their peers enjoying themselves while consuming alcohol, with little representation of negative outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between SNS, social norms and drinking behaviours is complex; there is a need for further research into the dynamics of this relationship to inform social marketing interventions.

Originality/value

While there is a body of research into commercial references to alcohol on SNS, there is less research into the ways young people utilise SNS to create their own meanings of, and interactions with, alcohol. The consumer research that has been conducted to date has focused on quantifying references to alcohol and drinking behaviours, observing profiles or surveying users. This study addresses a key gap in the literature that is needed to inform social marketing interventions to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: when, why and how do young people post about alcohol.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Anthony Shakeshaft, Julia Fawcett, Richard P. Mattick, Robyn Richmond, Alex Wodak, Mark F. Harris and Christopher M. Doran

The purpose of this research is to explore the feasibility of using patient‐driven, hand‐held computers in primary care settings, in order to address the apparent failure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the feasibility of using patient‐driven, hand‐held computers in primary care settings, in order to address the apparent failure to implement prevention initiatives into the routine delivery of health care services.

Design/methodology/approach

During an eight‐day period, patients of an English primary care practice who were at least 16 years of age were asked to complete a health‐related survey using a hand‐held computer. They received tailored, on‐screen feedback.

Findings

A total of 143 patients (approximately 55 per cent of all patients) began using a hand‐held computer, of whom 115 (80 per cent) answered all questions. Of these, 24 per cent reported being smokers, 7 per cent and 19 per cent were at‐risk of alcohol harm in the long and short term respectively and 14 per cent rated their overall health as poor or very poor. Most patients rated their level of satisfaction with the hand‐helds as excellent (36 per cent), very good (29 per cent) or good (24 per cent), while 89 per cent agreed to their primary care physician seeing a summary of their feedback.

Originality/value

This is the first study to evaluate the feasibility of using hand‐held computers to conduct patient screening and feedback in primary care settings.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Ranjan Datta and Margot Hurlbert

The purpose of this paper is to reveal gaps in knowledge about energy industries, federal and provincial governments and indigenous communities’ energy management policies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal gaps in knowledge about energy industries, federal and provincial governments and indigenous communities’ energy management policies and practices, as well as to highlight areas requiring further research and knowledge development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a scoping review framework according to scoping methodological framework.

Findings

This paper suggests that researchers need to examine Indigenous communities on past leaks response records, pipelines leaks impacts in their health and environment and current risk management processes and regulations to identify weaknesses. This review paper also suggests that significant time will be required to meaningfully and honestly engage with communities to move from acceptance, through approval, to co-ownership of the project as the firm builds its legitimacy, credibility and trust with Indigenous communities.

Originality/value

The authors introduce an original approach to scoping methodological framework that directly addresses the processes of reveal gaps in knowledge and practice. It offers researchers, policy-makers, community and practitioners an alternative approach which is culturally appropriate for improving economic and environmental health outcomes of marginalised groups.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Mette Irmgard Snertingdal

In this paper the aim is to explore what modes of governance, brief alcohol interventions in natal care, such as screening and motivational interviewing (MI) represent…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper the aim is to explore what modes of governance, brief alcohol interventions in natal care, such as screening and motivational interviewing (MI) represent, and what social consequences this mode of governance might lead to. Traditionally the Nordic public health research on alcohol control policies gives priority to general control measures aimed at the population. However, the paper seeks to argue the relevance of a governmentality perspective to analyze the mode of governance in brief alcohol interventions which aims at individual level of control.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical base of the paper rests on the contents of a brief intervention educational program aimed at midwifes and medical doctors in natal care in Norway. In light of the governmentality perspective the author analyzes screening and MI used in natal care as a mode of governance which fosters the process of responsibilization and the creation of the “irresponsible other”.

Findings

It is argued that brief alcohol intervention in natal care is a perfect example of a neoliberal mode of governance, because it is an indirect way of governance, which casts healthcare workers as a part of the state that wants to make pregnant woman self‐governing and responsible. Further this neoliberal mode of governance might lead to four different social consequences: blurring the line between the power of the state and the power of the self, which blurs the distinction between objective health hazards and moral judgment; spreading of powerful therapeutic‐tools to non‐therapeutic professions further neutralizes the moral dimensions; individualization of responsibilities for fetal health decontextualizes females' drinking habits; and drawing the attention of the healthcare worker towards regulations of normality and away from helping females with severe drinking problems.

Originality/value

Traditionally the Nordic public health research on alcohol control policies gives priority to general control measures aimed at the population. However, this paper shows the relevance of a governmentality perspective to analyze the mode of governance inherent in brief alcohol interventions which aims at an individual level of control. Alongside the general control measures in Norwegian alcohol policies, the state engages women at an individual level, through brief and early interventions. Hence the state has double targets of governance; first the general risk‐avoidance regulations directed at the population, and then the state also facilitating the targeting of individuals.

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