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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Carl Cater

This chapter examines the historical development of space tourism from early wondering at the heavens to more recent extraterrestrial astrotourism. It catalogs the…

Abstract

This chapter examines the historical development of space tourism from early wondering at the heavens to more recent extraterrestrial astrotourism. It catalogs the development of the significant terrestrial space tourism market, including dark-sky tourism, launch tours, zero-G flights, and edutainment experiences, as part of a “steps to space” for costlier future developments in space tourism. Recent developments in the suborbital sector initiated by the XPRIZE and spearheaded by Virgin Galactic are the next stage in this product ladder. All these draw on a rich history of space exploration – imagined, virtual, and real – that frames how future developments in space tourism can be viewed.

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Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

David Mitchell and Terrel Gallaway

This paper aims to examine the economic impact from dark-sky tourism in national parks in the USA on the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado Plateau is a region encompassing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the economic impact from dark-sky tourism in national parks in the USA on the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado Plateau is a region encompassing parts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah that is known for its dark, star-filled night skies. Tourists in national parks are increasingly interested in observing this natural recreational amenity – especially considering that it is an ecological amenity that is quickly disappearing from the planet. Using a 10-year forecast of visitors to the national parks and using standard input-output modeling, it is observed that, for the first time anywhere, the value of dark skies to tourism in this area. The authors find that non-local tourists who value dark skies will spend $5.8bn over the next 10 years in the Colorado Plateau. These tourist expenditures will generate $2.4bn in higher wages and create over 10,000 additional jobs each year for the region. Furthermore, as dark skies are even more intense natural amenity in the non-summer months, they have the ability to increase visitor counts to national parks year-round and lead to a more efficient use of local community and tourism-related resources throughout the year.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 10-year forecast of visitors to the national parks and using standard input-output modeling, we find that non-local tourists who value dark skies will spend $5.8bn over the next 10 years in the Colorado Plateau.

Findings

These tourist expenditures will generate $2.4bn in higher wages and create over 10,000 additional jobs each year for the region. Furthermore, as dark skies are even more intense natural amenity in the non-summer months, they have the ability to increase visitor counts to national parks year-round and lead to a more efficient use of local community and tourism-related resources throughout the year.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other study has attempted to value the environmental amenity of dark skies.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2017

Abimbola P. Alamu and Rocky J. Dwyer

The purpose of this paper is to explore human capital (HC) productivity strategies used by the tourism, hospitality, and leisure (THL) industry business leaders in Nigeria…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore human capital (HC) productivity strategies used by the tourism, hospitality, and leisure (THL) industry business leaders in Nigeria which improved the employee productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in this research study comprised randomly selected Southern Nigerian business leaders with specialist expertise in the THL industry. Individual interviews were undertaken with participants to gain both an insight and understanding regarding which strategies are best suited to improve employee productivity. A further analysis of workplace policies and procedures provided additional insights related to the application of such workplace practices toward productivity improvements.

Findings

The findings of this study identified that recruiting persons with essential social capital, inducting them into high ethical standards, providing in-house training, motivating employees with reward and recognition, and the adoption of affordable technologies are key industry strategies to build a productive employee workforce.

Practical implications

Implementing the findings from this study may help develop a new type of THL professionals, especially in the hotel and restaurant sub-sectors that will enhance the attractiveness of the THL industry and encourage patronage. The opportunity to interact with new people in THL businesses and locations may promote social interaction and integration that are invaluable to an ethnically and religiously diverse country such as Nigeria. These benefits are valuable and are essential positive social changes.

Originality/value

A structured HCD program might deliver a net benefit to the industry. To the employees, there may be improved remuneration, increased self-esteem, and job security. To the industry, there may be a reduction in employee turnover, improvement in productivity, improved attraction of graduates, and reduced engagement of illegal workers. The government could also experience increased gross domestic product.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Gayle Jennings, Carl I. Cater, Rob Hales, Sandra Kensbock and Glen Hornby

The purpose of this article is to study how real world learning was used to engender and enhance sustainability principles and practices with 11 micro-, small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to study how real world learning was used to engender and enhance sustainability principles and practices with 11 micro-, small- and medium-tourism business enterprises and 101 university tourism students enrolled across three university courses.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research processes were used to focus curricula on “education about and for sustainability”. A participatory paradigm informed the action research processes. The key methodology was qualitative. Empirical materials were generated through lived experiences, reflexive team conversations, team journals, reflexive journals and student learning materials. Reflexive conversations and reflective dialogue framed interpretations.

Findings

The action research process found that pedagogies, andragogies and ethnogogies that emphasize social processes of meaning making and sensemaking enhance and engender “education about sustainability” and “education for sustainability”, especially when coupled with real world learning as a platform for social and profession-building processes between university students, course teaching staff and industry, in this case, micro-, small- and medium-tourism entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative findings of this action research study are specific to the participants involved. Generalizability to other university and business settings and goodness of fit require further study.

Practical implications

Insights are provided with regard to implementing real world learning in university undergraduate and postgraduate courses by partnering with industry and focusing on education for sustainability (EfS). A demonstration of the effectiveness of action research as a tool for changing curricula is provided.

Social implications

Learning is a social process of meaning making. Time for real world social interaction is critical for learning. Partnering with industry complements student learning and facilitates the translation of theory into practice.

Originality/value

EfS is engendered and enhanced when learning-teaching engagements are predicated on real world settings, circumstances and experiences.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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