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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Andrea Wigfield, Katy Wright, Elizabeth Burtney and Diane Buddery

The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for the workforce in terms of job roles, skills, knowledge, training, and support.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used, through a quantitative electronic survey of staff working in social care (as well as some health care) organisations in England, and three qualitative case studies of local authorities.

Findings

The research shows that the organisations involved in delivering Assisted Living Technology, the types of Assisted Living Technology being introduced, and the way in which it is being delivered, have implications for job roles and the skills and knowledge needed by staff. The associated training and workforce development similarly varies across the social care sector; it is ad hoc, disparate, and provided primarily by individual employers or by suppliers and manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for a standardised Assisted Living Technology workforce development approach which can be used across the social care sector.

Practical implications

The varied nature of Assisted Living Technology providers and delivery models presents a challenge to the development and implementation of a standardised programme of workforce development.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of new empirical research arising from a quantitative and qualitative study of the workforce development implications of Assisted Living Technology in the English social care sector.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Gloria Puliga, Akhatjon Nasullaev, Flavio Bono, Eugenio Gutiérrez and Fernanda Strozzi

The authors analyse the impact of European funding research programmes on the topic of Ambient Assisted Living by considering its status, future context, and the…

311

Abstract

Purpose

The authors analyse the impact of European funding research programmes on the topic of Ambient Assisted Living by considering its status, future context, and the implications for prospective knowledge management.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply our variation of classical Systematic Literature Review – Systematic Literature Network Analysis, which also includes bibliographic networks – to identify the readership cliques of the associated technological publication outputs.

Findings

The authors’ main conclusion suggests that there was an increase in scientific production on AAL fields just after the start of the two EU funding programmes (2008 and 2014). Three main research directions were identified: activity and vital sign recognition, human-computer interaction and technology acceptance.

Originality/value

To date, previous reviews on Ambient Assisted Livig focus on specific aspects, such as the study of technology. The present review provides a complete overview of Ambient Assisted living technology and it grasps how the European funds have impacted on the development of this technology.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2010

Leela Damodaran and Wendy Olphert

This paper reports the findings of a literature review conducted to investigate user responses to assisted living technologies (ALTs), principally telehealth and telecare…

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of a literature review conducted to investigate user responses to assisted living technologies (ALTs), principally telehealth and telecare applications. A combination of search terms identified approximately 75 relevant publications, including reports of studies in the US, Australia, Europe and the UK. The documents were analysed to extract data relating to end‐user needs, what attracts end users and informal carers to telehealth/telecare services, and what deters them from adopting these technologies. Some key challenges arising for the uptake and adoption of ALTs are then discussed, and significant user requirements emerging from the evidence are identified. The paper concludes with suggestions for the next steps to be taken to promote effective and appropriate use of ALTs.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Cathy Bailey, Julie Doyle, Susan Squires, Cliodhna ni Scanaill, Chie Wei Fan, Cormac Sheehan, Clodagh Cunningham and Ben Dromey

This paper seeks to discuss the authors' experiences of multidisciplinary practice in relation to developing home‐based assisted living technologies.

539

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the authors' experiences of multidisciplinary practice in relation to developing home‐based assisted living technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on almost three years' experience of working within an ongoing, large, multi‐sited and multidisciplinary Irish national research programme: the Technology for Independent Living Centre. This involved industry and academic partners. Teams of clinicians, physical and social scientists, technologists, engineers, designers and ethnographers worked with older adults to design, test and deliver, home‐based technologies that focus on mitigating falls, keeping socially connected and maintaining or improving cognitive function. The authors' experiences and challenges are organised and presented through their retrospective team building model: ENDEA and through comparison with team building literature.

Findings

Learning outcomes and implications for technology focused multidisciplinary practice are offered. The paper concludes that a vital step in developing successful assisted living technologies with and for older adults is to spend resources on building effective, creative and committed multidisciplinary teams and practices.

Originality/value

The model, ENDEA, is proposed which is a blueprint for successful outcomes, through the management and delivery of multidisciplinary research.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Gillian Ward, Maggie Winchcombe and Grace Teah

A three-year research study, funded by Innovate UK, Consumer Models for Assisted Living (COMODAL) aimed to support the development of the consumer market for electronic…

Abstract

Purpose

A three-year research study, funded by Innovate UK, Consumer Models for Assisted Living (COMODAL) aimed to support the development of the consumer market for electronic assisted living technology (eALT) products and services, particularly for people aged 50-70, approaching older age and retirement themselves or with caring responsibilities for family or friends. The purpose of the COMODAL study was to gain a greater understanding of their needs and behaviours relating to the acquisition of eALT and develop sustainable consumer-led business models that might address these needs and support business development within a consumer market (Ward et al., 2016). The purpose of this paper is to present a follow up study to explore how the market may have changed since the publication of the research findings.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used to collect both qualitative and quantitative data from individuals working in the supply and distribution of assisted living technologies in the UK regarding how their businesses had developed in the past two years.

Findings

The results showed that since the publication of the COMODAL research there have been changes in the way that the consumer market for eALT is being approached, not only with more direct marketing focused on consumer’s needs but also in direct partnerships with local authorities that offer greater choice with an improved range of products.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in the UK to follow up the impact of the original COMODAL research and explore its influence on the development of the consumer market for eALT.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Kevin Doughty and Gareth Williams

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an end-to-end process to improve the prescription, uptake and utilisation of assisted living technologies in order to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an end-to-end process to improve the prescription, uptake and utilisation of assisted living technologies in order to improve outcomes for older and disabled people.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach involved consideration of the ways in which people’s support needs are considered and how a more relevant picture can be drawn using their own goals and the issues and obstacles that prevent them achieving improvement. New models of support were introduced in order to improve the suitability of prescriptions for people who lived under different circumstances, sometimes with family carers.

Findings

It was found that the application of an enhanced assessment approach required professionals and family members to understand more about the range of available technologies and their limitations. In order to avoid rejection of the technology, there will be a need for service providers to extend the range of applications that they offer, and to consider the suitability of the home environment for introducing new systems.

Practical implications

The new model of assessment and prescription will improve the options for independent living for many people with minor disabilities and age-related problems.

Social implications

The correct use of assistive technologies will be improved leading to users having more confidence in the use of technologies to support independence in place of conventional and expensive care services.

Originality/value

The new model of assessment and prescription described in this paper is novel and developed by the authors as original work. Its value is that it disrupts current assessment schemes and will encourage innovation in prescription, and a more person-centred approach to satisfying the needs of vulnerable people.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Majid H. Alsulami, Mohammed S. Alsaqer and Anthony S. Atkins

Technology plays an important role in assisting elderly people to live independently, longer and improve their quality of life and health, in supporting their daily…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology plays an important role in assisting elderly people to live independently, longer and improve their quality of life and health, in supporting their daily activities, etc. The ageing population becomes a global phenomenon. The population of Saudi Arabia continues to age (>60 years of age) currently (5%) compared to other group ages. In 2050, it will increase rapidly to 20.9% of the Saudi population. The current research aims at examining the barriers that health-care providers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are experiencing in the adoption of ambient assisted living (AAL) technologies among the elderly. The study aims to identify a challenging issue with the increasing the number of elderly among the population in the country, which has highlighted the need to use AAL technology to improve the quality of life among the elderly.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved a community of practice (CoP) study as a method of data collection where data collected were presented and discussed in line with the existing literature review findings.

Findings

In total, 14 factors were identified in this study and discussed in the context of Saudi Arabia, which resulted in developing a decision-making framework for using AAL by health-care providers. Those factors are essential in boosting the usage of technology in improving elderly health in Saudi Arabia.

Research limitations/implications

This study includes implications for developing a decision-making framework for using AAL.

Social implications

This study clarifies that technology can connect elderly people with society.

Originality/value

In total, 14 factors were identified in this study and discussed in the context of Saudi Arabia.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 March 2011

Julia Clark and Marilyn McGee‐Lennon

An increase in the ageing UK population is leading to new ways of looking at how we deliver health and social care services in the UK. The use of assisted living technology

Abstract

An increase in the ageing UK population is leading to new ways of looking at how we deliver health and social care services in the UK. The use of assisted living technology (ALT) and telecare is already playing a part in these new models of care. Yet despite the current advances in the range of technology and networking capabilities in the home, ALT and telecare solutions have not been taken up as eagerly as might have been anticipated. The study reported here used scenario‐based focus groups with a wide variety of stakeholders in home care to identify the existing barriers to the successful uptake of ALTs and telecare in Scotland. Six focus group sessions were conducted with individual stakeholder groups (social care workers, policy makers, telecare installation technicians, older users, informal carers) and five conducted with mixed stakeholder groups. The focus groups used the same home care scenario to identify and categorise the different perceptions, attitudes, and expectations of the various stakeholders when discussing telecare implementation for a fictitious older couple. The emerging themes from the focus groups were analysed and categorised according to the Framework Analysis approach. We present a synthesised list of the current barriers to the uptake of ALTs and telecare ‐ and discuss how each of these barriers might be overcome. If these barriers are addressed, we believe telehealthcare technologies will be better designed, more usable, easier to prescribe effectively, more acceptable to more users in more contexts, and ultimately more common place in homes throughout the UK.

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Kevin Doughty, David Godfrey and Billy Mulvihill

This paper critically reviews the motivations for introducing different connected healthcare to support Assisted Living in older and other vulnerable groups. The aim is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper critically reviews the motivations for introducing different connected healthcare to support Assisted Living in older and other vulnerable groups. The aim is to develop a new approach that will be sustainable in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involves a consideration of assessment criteria currently being employed and the resulting costs and limitations in providing a person centred approach. The implications of introducing new technologies such as plesiocare and mCare are then considered.

Findings

It was found that one of the most cost‐effective applications of technology is in the support of informal carers but the telecare equipment that they are offered may not be the most appropriate.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited by a lack of formal risk assessments that are person centred. The implications include the need for improved training in assessment processes and access to a wider inventory of technologies.

Practical implications

Existing telecare services will need to change in order to adopt more plesiocare and self‐care approaches and to engage more actively in the development of models based on mcare.

Social implications

Governments and health ministries may achieve better and lower cost support for their ageing population by adopting a model that includes multiple layers of technology, including easier access to self‐care and mCare technologies.

Originality/value

This paper includes the first discussion on plesiocare and its relative advantages over telecare in supporting informal carers.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Julia Lesley Hennessy and Averyl Rodrigues

The population of New Zealand (NZ) is ageing; the proportion of people aged 65 and over as compared with the younger age groups is expected to increase from 15 per cent in…

Abstract

Purpose

The population of New Zealand (NZ) is ageing; the proportion of people aged 65 and over as compared with the younger age groups is expected to increase from 15 per cent in 2016 to approximately 30 per cent by 2068. This change in demographics is bound to apply some pressure on economic resources due to factors such as superannuation and increased healthcare needs. The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of technology as being economically beneficial for managing the grey tsunami that has commenced in NZ. Though technology is still not being utilised to its full capacity in the healthcare sector, there is a reason enough to believe that it could be used in assisting with ageing in place. However, its cost-effectiveness has not been clearly demonstrated.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was performed using search engines such as ProQuest, EBSCO, CINAHL and Google Scholar. Keywords used were ageing in place, technology, assisted living technology, ageing, telecare and telehealth. The papers selected were publicly available. To determine if the cost evaluation literature were of acceptable quality, they were assessed according to a well-recognised economic evaluation checklist by Drummond et al. (2005).

Findings

As is evident from the demographic figures, there needs to be timely intervention to appropriately manage the ageing population given the projected financial and population figures. Technology has proved beneficial especially with positive ageing. A significant reason for it hardly being used is the lack of thorough studies that demonstrate its cost-effectiveness. The studies that have tackled the subject of economic evaluation have provided mixed results with some labelling technology as cost-effective and the others opposing this finding. Studies have shown that even the simplest form of technology such as a phone call, mobile health application or a pedometer can be effective.

Research limitations/implications

The majority of research and funding is directed towards supporting the frail adults instead there should be equal focus on those who are reaching the old age group. Since current data suggest that people are living longer, early intervention is beneficial to reduce the number of years lived with disabilities along with associated costs of disease burden.

Practical implications

Healthcare policymakers need to take more proactive steps through incorporating technology rather than deferring its use until proven beneficial by large studies as this is not feasible given the rate at which technology is developing. Studies have shown that even the simplest form of technology such as a phone call, mobile health application or a pedometer can be effective.

Social implications

Technology increases awareness and allows people to be more disciplined with their health plan which increases good health. Early intervention also means relying and involving the primary level of care to manage the disease which would be more economically beneficial than postponing care until the disease progresses in which case secondary or tertiary levels of care must be sought.

Originality/value

This is an emerging field in the area of aged care and only begins to expand potential horizons. Studies show that a significant number of the population prefer to stay in their own homes as they age and that with the improvement in technology this could become a reality. However, health planners need to be considering technology when developing health and social services.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

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