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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Richard K. Matta

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”) of 1974, as amended , applies to securities professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”) of 1974, as amended , applies to securities professionals such as registered investment advisers, registered broker‐dealers and individual registered representatives and financial planners who advise, manage, or trade for investment portfolios of private employee benefit plans and individual retirement accounts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed as a primer to familiarize securities professionals with the terminology, scope and subject‐matter of ERISA as it applies to benefit plan investment transactions. When appropriate, the regulatory framework of ERISA is compared and contrasted with the more familiar securities law regulatory scheme.

Findings

The various Federal laws loosely known as “ERISA” significantly impact securities professionals in connection with the marketing of financial products and services to employee benefit plans, including IRAs, and it is critical that securities professionals have a general overview of how they do so.

Research limitations/implications

The research set out is only a broad summary, and covers an area of law that is rapidly developing. It should not be considered a definitive summary of the law but a starting‐point for further, in‐depth inquiry.

Practical implications

Any financial professional seeking to develop or market financial products and services to benefit plans can use the paper to become familiar with the framework and terminology of ERISA.

Originality/value

This is a reprint of a paper first published in 2004, with extensive revisions to reflect sweeping changes in the law and new developments in the financial marketplace, plus an overview of “hot topics”.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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15955

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

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13978

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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13433

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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13419

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Nick French

Considers the management of the valuation exercise required of localauthorities to enable them to include asset valuations in their balancesheets after 1994. Examines the…

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2080

Abstract

Considers the management of the valuation exercise required of local authorities to enable them to include asset valuations in their balance sheets after 1994. Examines the problems and opportunities which may come with the development of an asset register and asset rents and, in particular, the valuation principles to be employed.

Details

Property Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2019

Mustapha Munir, Arto Kiviniemi and Stephen W. Jones

Currently, building information modelling (BIM) is largely seen as a 3D model, not as an information model or information management tool. This wrong perception of BIM and…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, building information modelling (BIM) is largely seen as a 3D model, not as an information model or information management tool. This wrong perception of BIM and low interest in 3D asset management (AM) is one of the major reasons for the slow adoption by clients in the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. The purpose of this paper is to identify the techniques and strategies of streamlining AM systems for BIM-based integration, and how the information is captured from physical assets towards BIM-based integration for clients to derive value from BIM investments.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study strategy was used to study the strategic implementation process of integrating BIM with AM systems and the business value of BIM in AM by a large asset owner in the UK.

Findings

The paper identifies key strategies in the adoption of BIM-based processes by an asset owner, the implementation process, the challenges and the benefits attained. Several barriers were identified as the challenges of adopting BIM-based processes in AM: complexity and cost associated with BIM; irrelevance of 3D geometric data in AM processes; nature of asset ownership structure; managing the asset handover process; managing change within the organisation. Organisations will have to consider the following issues in streaming asset information with BIM: the development for a clear strategy prior to adoption; connecting the strategy to the business goals; and conducting the discovery exercise to identify organisational information needs.

Originality/value

The research addresses a significant gap in the development of techniques and strategies for asset owners to streamline BIM with AM systems and derive business value from such integration. The research context is a case study involving a large owner-operator in the UK that has been able to derive value from BIM systems in their AM processes. The key value of the paper is improving asset owners’ understanding of BIM in AM by demonstrating the implementation strategies, linkage to organisational objectives, challenges, value management process and business value of BIM in AM. Another contribution of the paper is improving the understanding of BIM, which is usually viewed as 3D models and that 3D geometric data do not have much value for AM tasks.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Peter Dent

Considers the nature of local authority assets within the context of overall management objectives. Raises questions about the categorization of public assets and the way…

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2000

Abstract

Considers the nature of local authority assets within the context of overall management objectives. Raises questions about the categorization of public assets and the way in which they are perceived by local authorities. Analyses research undertaken to examine the compilation of asset registers, the methods for the valuation of these assets, the appropriateness of such methods and the resulting explanations of value. Assesses the recently completed exercise undertaken by UK authorities to record their property asset stock and suggests, in the longer term, how such an exercise could be modified to incorporate more appropriate means of valuing some of its assets.

Details

Property Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Karen Conneely

The purpose of this paper is to show the benefits to be obtained from radio frequency ID (RFID) for improved asset management and accountability.

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1311

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the benefits to be obtained from radio frequency ID (RFID) for improved asset management and accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

Examines the technology's potential for asset management across industry sectors.

Findings

Finds that the majority of companies have very little grasp of how inaccurate the asset register can be, believing stored data could only be a maximum of 5 per cent inaccurate. RFID tags allow those responsible for managing fixed assets far greater visibility into the true condition and value of those assets. For example, workers of heavy machinery, such as mechanics and drivers, can gain instant insight to all the machinery parts' maintenance history as well as information on unique identifiers including part numbers, serial numbers and manufacturers' codes.

Practical implications

By adopting RFID, scanning can be undertaken by line managers on a regular basis in a matter of minutes, without impacting the organisation's core operations in any way. The tight integration with the full asset history and general ledger ensures unprecedented accuracy and auditability of the entire asset register.

Originality/value

Draws attention to the benefits of RFID and the current under‐utilisation of this established technology.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

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26040

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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