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Article

Terry Clark and Daniel Rajaratnam

As the twentieth century draws to a close, trade in services has begun to dominate the economies of many nations. International trade in services has also grown…

Abstract

As the twentieth century draws to a close, trade in services has begun to dominate the economies of many nations. International trade in services has also grown significantly, yet little research has been undertaken to understand international services. Theory lags practice by a considerable degree. This paper examines the international trade and services marketing literature, develops a definition and classification scheme of four types of international services, discusses recent trends in international services data and presents some perspectives on the future of international services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 13 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Juho Soinio, Kari Tanskanen and Max Finne

This work aims to combine the perspectives of logistics‐service providers (LSPs) and small and medium‐sized enterprises (SME) in the development of value‐added logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to combine the perspectives of logistics‐service providers (LSPs) and small and medium‐sized enterprises (SME) in the development of value‐added logistics services. The purpose was to create a theory‐based and initially tested framework that could help both service providers and SMEs identify new opportunities for developing their logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

The research followed design‐science methodology and was carried out via semi‐structured interviews within the case company (a large Finnish LSP), its customers, and experts from the area of logistics services. Data on companies offering value‐added logistics services were also used in the research. The focus of the research was on advanced value‐added logistics services.

Findings

The paper presents a framework for categorizing logistics services for SMEs and proposes new logistics‐service models for SME customers. Altogether, three service models are proposed to bridge the gap between LSP and SME customers. In particular, the consulting‐oriented approach seemed to be appropriate for the SMEs. The other two models, 3PL with planning and Outsourced Chief Logistics Officer, require more effort from both parties.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a theoretical framework for categorizing logistics services and discusses the strategic options for an LSP to expand its service portfolio. However, further empirical research related to logistics‐service design is needed to develop the framework further and to improve its external validity.

Practical implications

This work offers insights that support LSPs to develop their service offerings to better match the needs of SMEs, and also allow managers of SMEs to better utilize the available LSP competence and services.

Originality/value

The existing research in the area of value‐added logistics services has mainly focused on either the customer perspective or the service‐provider perspective. The dyad combining these perspectives has been largely neglected. Furthermore, studies in this area have been on large enterprises as opposed to SMEs. This work fills this gap by designing value‐added logistics‐service models that combine SME needs with LSP capabilities.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Anna Fredriksson, Mats Janné and Martin Rudberg

The use of third-party logistics (TPL) setups in construction has increased but is still a new phenomenon. The purpose was to increase understanding of how structural and…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of third-party logistics (TPL) setups in construction has increased but is still a new phenomenon. The purpose was to increase understanding of how structural and management dimensions are related in CLSs by describing how CTPL setups are used.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten dimensions to describe and structure CLSs were identified from the literature and used to structure a cross-case analysis of 13 Swedish CLSs.

Findings

The main findings are: (1) there are three typical initiators of CLSs: municipalities, developers and contractors; (2) CLSs are drivers for service differentiation and modularization among TPL providers as construction specific services are required; (3) CLSs play a new role in construction by coordinating logistics activities between the construction project and the vicinity of the site.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on 13 cases in the Swedish construction context. Additional studies of CLSs in other countries are needed.

Practical implications

The ten dimensions can be used as a guide in designing a CLS and in determining the order of design decisions. The identification and structuring of CTPL services also exemplify the variety of service offerings.

Originality/value

This is one of the first cross-case analyses of CLSs enabling the characterization of CTPL setups. This study identifies how different services included in the setup relate to the roles of SCM and logistics in construction.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article

Mohammed Abdur Razzaque and Chang Chen Sheng

Recent times have witnessed a heightened global interest in outsourcing of logistics functions. This is indicated by the volume of writings on the subject in various…

Abstract

Recent times have witnessed a heightened global interest in outsourcing of logistics functions. This is indicated by the volume of writings on the subject in various scholarly journals, trade publications and popular magazines. However, efforts to organize them in an integrated body of knowledge appear to be very limited. Keeping this in view, this paper makes an attempt to develop a comprehensive literature on outsourcing based on more than 100 published articles, papers and books on the subject.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article

Susan S. Krawczyk

During 2003, compensation practices for the retail sale of mutual funds came under fire. Recent revelations about failures in the processing of mutual fund breakpoints had…

Abstract

During 2003, compensation practices for the retail sale of mutual funds came under fire. Recent revelations about failures in the processing of mutual fund breakpoints had triggered a more in‐depth investigation into mutual fund marketing and compensation practice by securities regulators, Congress, and the states. This article focuses on the regulation of sales compensation practices primarily as it affects a broker‐dealer selling mutual funds in the retail market. It addresses the regulatory framework for three key compensation practices: (1) the use of non‐cash compensation in connection with mutual fund sales; (2) marketing and compensation arrangements providing enhanced compensation to a selling firm as well as to its sales representatives for the promotion of certain fund securities over others, such as proprietary funds over non‐proprietary funds, preferred funds over non‐preferred funds, and Class B shares over Class A shares; and (3) the use of commissions for mutual fund portfolio trades as an additional source of selling compensation for selling firms, a practice sometimes referred to as ”directed brokerage.“

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

Content available
Article

Ioanna Falagara Sigala and Tina Wakolbinger

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the potential of outsourcing of humanitarian logistics activities to commercial logistics service providers (LSPs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the potential of outsourcing of humanitarian logistics activities to commercial logistics service providers (LSPs) throughout the different disaster phases. The authors identify incentives for initiating outsourcing of humanitarian logistics activities to commercial logistics providers, humanitarian logistics activities to be outsourced and selection criteria for partners.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on empirical data collected by interviewing 12 practitioners from commercial LSPs and 12 practitioners from humanitarian organizations (HOs). A review of related literature guided this research.

Findings

This research shows that incentives for initiating outsourcing engagements, partner selection criteria and activities to be outsourced are changing throughout the different disaster phases. A number of research propositions are presented.

Research limitations/implications

This research constitutes a first step towards the goal of a comprehensive analysis of humanitarian logistics outsourcing throughout the different disaster phases. The authors collected data from practitioners and large organizations based mainly in Europe and the USA. Hence, insights from national and local organizations of other parts of the world are missing.

Practical implications

This research provides a deeper understanding of outsourcing of humanitarian logistics activities. As the main implication for practice, the research suggests a strategic use of outsourcing during the three disaster phases. The authors acknowledge that business objectives, risks, stakeholder agendas and requirements, as well as costs play a vital and changing role for outsourcing decision-making during the three disaster stages. The managerial implications arising from the research can provide support to commercial LSPs and HOs that initiate or develop strategic outsourcing relationships.

Originality/value

This study covers the gap in the humanitarian literature related to context-specific factors of outsourcing in humanitarian logistics by empirically investigating the phenomenon. This is one of the first studies that empirically investigate the potential of outsourcing of humanitarian logistics activities throughout the disaster phases.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article

Jane Broadbent and Richard Laughlin

The Private Finance Initiative (PFI) is designed to introduce new resources into the national infrastructure. It introduces the idea that the public sector can provide…

Abstract

The Private Finance Initiative (PFI) is designed to introduce new resources into the national infrastructure. It introduces the idea that the public sector can provide services by purchasing them from the private sector rather than by direct provision. There have been considerable disagreements about how to account for these transactions. Key in this has been differences of view as to whether PFI transactions involve purchase of assets and thus whether the transaction should appear on the balance‐sheets of the public sector. This seemingly technical question has generated considerable debate and disagreements between the UK government and the Accounting Standards Board (ASB). Closer investigation into this disagreement demonstrates a range of alternative views and tensions. Describes and analyses these different views and the inter‐ and intra‐relationships and tensions between these parties using an interests‐based, political framework for this contextual analysis. Demonstrates how accounting standard setting, in cases such as accounting for PFI, if only analysed at the technical level, misses a range of social dynamics that are central to understanding the role of accounting in the development of society.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article

Shams Rahman and Yen‐Chun Jim Wu

This study aims to investigate differences among Chinese manufacturers‐cum‐suppliers in their logistics services provided to different local and foreign customers and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate differences among Chinese manufacturers‐cum‐suppliers in their logistics services provided to different local and foreign customers and assess the management areas that they must address in order to satisfy the logistics requirements of their customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐based survey was conducted amongst managers of manufacturing firms in four industries, automotive, telecommunication and computer, household appliance, and electronics, located in the Shanghai region of China. A five‐point Likert scale (1 – least important, 5 – most important) was used to measure the importance of services provided, and assess customer satisfaction level, impact on management of manufacturers, and difficulties and challenges faced by the manufacturers.

Findings

The results indicate that foreign customers place significant emphasis on different services from those of their local counterparts. Results also indicate that many challenges need to be addressed by the manufacturers with respect to HR, customer service, and IT integration. A significant difference between manufacturers' satisfaction levels with local and foreign customers is also noticeable.

Practical implications

Since third‐party logistics (3PL) industry in China is still in its infancy. Most of the Chinese manufacturing firms have to provide major logistics services to their customers. Hence further growth of the Chinese economy depends to a large extent on the ability of the manufacturing firms to provide efficient and effective logistics services. The findings of this study demonstrate that in order for the outsourced manufacturers in China to provide logistics services to local and foreign customers, they are required to restructure their organizations and adjust their operation strategies.

Originality/value

This study is a rare attempt to discuss outsourced manufacturers in China in adjusting their logistics strategies and operations to meet the demands from both local and foreign customers after China's admission to the World Trade Organization.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article

Shams Rahman

Over the last two decades, a large number of studies have been conducted in the field of outsourcing third‐party logistics (3PL) services and the field is growing. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last two decades, a large number of studies have been conducted in the field of outsourcing third‐party logistics (3PL) services and the field is growing. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which 3PL services are outsourced by Australian firms. Specifically, it investigates the motivation for outsourcing, the average length of 3PL contracts, types of logistics services used and the impact of the use of outsourcing logistics services on customer satisfaction, logistics costs and employee morale of the user companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a questionnaire survey conducted in Australia. The sample was drawn from companies listed in Dun & Bradstreet's 500 largest Australian firms. Banks and other financial firms, insurance companies and real estate companies were excluded from the list of firms and a total of 210 firms were identified for this study. Data were collected against a number of items pertaining to the extent of 3PL use and its impact on performance.

Findings

The results revealed that the most frequently used logistics functions are warehouse management, order fulfillment and fleet management. The top three factors that motivated the firms to outsource are cost reduction, reduction in capital investment, and enhanced operational flexibility. The level of satisfaction with 3PL service providers is high at 86 percent and is reflected in the indication to continue their use in the future. However, employee morale has been adversely affected in 50 percent of 3PL users.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the current 3PL practices and the trends in 3PL services for achieving improved business results.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part

Dandrielle Lewis and Aram deKoven

This chapter provides the structure of an engaging intercultural, out of class, integrative curricular Somali Immersion Experience (SIE) offered to University of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides the structure of an engaging intercultural, out of class, integrative curricular Somali Immersion Experience (SIE) offered to University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Education Studies majors and nonmajors who are not exposed to many different races, ethnicities, and people from different cultures because of the demographics of Eau Claire.

Methodology/approach

SIE participants complete 24 classroom hours and a weeklong immersion into the Somali Community of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota. Critical Race Theory provides the framework for the coursework. Quantitative data is collected via pre- and post-SIE online surveys and classroom assignments. Qualitative data is collected via summative papers and reflective sessions.

Findings

The results indicate that participants develop understanding and knowledge of Somali culture, religious practices, life styles and school lives, as well as their performance in teaching, reading, mathematics, and social studies to nonnative speakers of English. The participants’ preconceived notions about Somalians, Muslims, and Islam were based on what they saw portrayed in the media. After the SIE, participants expressed how much knowledge they gained about best practices in English as a Second Language instruction, communicating: “Somalians and Muslims are a peaceful people.” One participant exclaimed “I have learned more in a week than I have learned during my field teaching experience and more than I have learned by taking a semester long class.”

Originality/value

This chapter offers help to individuals and institutions wanting to improve students’ exposure to diversity through domestic immersions.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

Keywords

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