Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Lauren Fralinger and Jonathan Bull

In an educational world with increasing internationalization, digitization, assessment and financial justification, US institutions, especially academic libraries, must…

Abstract

Purpose

In an educational world with increasing internationalization, digitization, assessment and financial justification, US institutions, especially academic libraries, must justify each new project. Institutional Repositories (IRs) are no exception. The authors attempt to identify factors that might affect the international usage of US IRs as part of assessment efforts to determine an IR's return‐on‐investment.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was disseminated to IR administrators asking for demographic information, international usage counts for website hits and downloads, and any internationalization efforts connected to the IR in order to determine any influencing factors on an IR's international usage.

Findings

While many IRs reported various rates of international usage, the largest group of respondents did not report an international usage rate for both page hits and downloads, despite overwhelmingly expressing an importance of international traffic to their IR and parent institution.

Research limitations/implications

It is not clear if this non‐reporting of international usage could be due to ignorance, apathy, or lack of technological support on the part of the IR administrators.

Practical implications

Determining international usage as a part of an IR assessment might be problematic or even impossible for many US IRs.

Originality/value

This study suggests that many IR administrators either do not know, do not care, and/or cannot record international usage data for their respective IRs, which could hinder determining an international return‐on‐investment for the IR.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Shajitha C. and Abdul Majeed K.C.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the institutional repositories (IRs) in South India in terms of policy and procedures, technology, content and contributors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the institutional repositories (IRs) in South India in terms of policy and procedures, technology, content and contributors, promotion and assessment and personnel.

Design/methodology/approach

A voluntary survey was conducted to assess IRs in South India. The questionnaire was designed according to the study framework, which comprises 64 indicators across five areas: policy and procedures, technology, content and contributors, promotion and assessment and personnel. Furthermore, all of the 23 IRs identified were monitored over one year period (from February 2018 to January 2019) to analyse the content growth.

Findings

The Research Archive of Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad was found to provide more services to users than other South Indian IRs and it was the sole IR to embed a metadata field for author identification. Almost all the IRs were actively engaged in promotion and assessment activities. IR performance in the technology area was substandard in comparison with performance in the policy and procedures and promotion and assessment areas. For all South Indian IRs, content growth was low.

Originality/value

Very few in-depth studies have evaluated South Indian IRs across all five of the areas listed above and in recent years, no such comprehensive study has been conducted in India at all.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

JoAnne Sparks, Linda O'Brien, Joanna Richardson, Malcolm Wolski, Sanja Tadic and Joanne Morris

The purpose of this paper is to report on “turning a new page” (TNP), a business improvement initiative undertaken by Scholarly Information & Research (SIR). The aim is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on “turning a new page” (TNP), a business improvement initiative undertaken by Scholarly Information & Research (SIR). The aim is to embed innovation and integrate e‐research and library services. SIR is part of the Information Services (INS) division at Griffith University, one of the top research universities in Australia. SIR provides library services, publication support and eResearch services to over 43,000 students and staff at five campuses and online.

Design/methodology/approach

TNP combines methods from best practices around continuous improvement, change management and business planning to achieve better alignment operationally and to prioritise potential improvements to services. The focus is on services required in three to five years for the “new generation” of users who will need them.

Findings

Existing services were unevenly delivered and resources unevenly distributed. A key initial step is restructuring to collocate similar capabilities and redistribute resources, and provides a framework for developing future capacity. The integrated staffing approach nurtures innovation and skills development.

Originality/value

Integrating e‐research services with library services to this extent has not been achieved in an Australian context before. The combination of methods applied and the progress achieved to date illustrates the value of the approach and may be relevant for other research‐intensive universities.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Eun G. Park and Marc Richard

The aim of this study is to assess the metadata element sets of electronic theses and dissertations that are currently used at Canadian academic institutional repositories

Downloads
1669

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to assess the metadata element sets of electronic theses and dissertations that are currently used at Canadian academic institutional repositories, and to discuss issues related to variations and inconsistencies in Dublin Core data used by participating repositories.

Design/methodology/approach

The formats and usage patterns of metadata elements at ten participating institutional repositories are identified and analyzed. Additionally, metadata element variations are grouped by different types.

Findings

Current metadata elements have a significant level of inconsistency and variation.

Research limitations/implications

The observations drawn from this study are limited to Canadian cases only. However, the results provide insights into developing a metadata framework for institutional repositories in other countries.

Originality/value

This study examines empirical data collected from data providers among Canadian institutional repositories. The result of this study may be beneficial to the achievement of interoperability across institutional repositories and to the development of a standardized application profile for Canadian institutional repositories.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2011

Jennifer Campbell-Meier

This study investigated the development of institutional repositories (IRs) at doctoral institutions, identifying factors that influence development and best practices…

Abstract

This study investigated the development of institutional repositories (IRs) at doctoral institutions, identifying factors that influence development and best practices using a comparative case study analysis approach to gather and analyze data. The development of a repository is one of the more complex projects that librarians may undertake. While many librarians have managed large information system projects, IR projects involve a larger stakeholder group and require support from technical services, public services, and administration to succeed. A significant increase in the development of repositories is expected with technology and process improvements for digital collection development so further study is warranted. Both institutional and subject repositories were examined for the case studies. Best practices and recommendations for future developers, such as early involvement of stakeholder groups and the need to educate both librarians and teaching faculty about open access collections, are also discussed. This study contributes to a more informed understanding of the development of IRs and identifies a model framework for future IR developers. The best practices framework incorporates the processes from the case study sites and includes additional factors identified from the case study interviews. Key to the framework is the inclusion of stakeholder groups on campus and assessment measures. While the case studies focused on doctoral institutions, the framework can be adapted to any size institution.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-014-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Rocio Serrano-Vicente, Remedios Melero and Ernest Abadal

The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a set of indicators, an overview of the way in which Spanish institutional repositories are run and the services they…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a set of indicators, an overview of the way in which Spanish institutional repositories are run and the services they offer their respective institutions and other users. The selected descriptors are based on aspects related to technology, procedures, content, marketing and the personnel responsible for managing repositories.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to establish the indicators, a thorough review of the literature was carried out to identify existing indicators that are used to assess repositories. These were divided into five categories (technology, procedures, content, marketing and personnel) with a total of 48 components. An online survey was conducted with the repositories managers of 66 Spanish research institutions in order to verify the degree of fulfilment of the selected indicators.

Findings

The survey received forty-six responses, which represented a response rate of 69 per cent. Of these, 44 came from universities and two from research centres. In total, 65 per cent of the repositories have the capacity to import data from and export data to other university systems, mainly Current Research Information System (32 per cent). Most repositories have mechanisms for the large-scale import and export of metadata and digital objects (83 per cent). The use of altmetrics in repositories is widespread (44 per cent). Authors and librarians deposit most frequently (37 and 32 per cent, respectively), in spite of the fact that 44 per cent do not have full-time staff working in the repository. In more than 80 per cent of the repositories, between 90 and 100 per cent of the deposits are full-text documents. With respect to the tools used to promote the repository within the institution, these are primarily face-to-face training sessions (82 per cent), followed by support materials such as manuals and help pages (65 per cent). The academic authorities encourage open access among researchers in 56 per cent of cases, a significant element in repository marketing.

Originality/value

This work proposes a model based on five dimensions and 48 indicators to assess institutional repositories. This approach has been applied to Spanish institutional repositories to provide up-to-date information about their management procedures and promotional methods and the services they offer authors and the university community. This overview of Spanish repositories has provided an insight into the way in which repositories have evolved in recent years and allowed potential improvements to be identified based on the most advanced repositories. This model can also be exported to assess institutional repositories in other countries.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Sadiat Adetoro Salau, Georgina U. Oyedum, F.P. Abifarin, S.J. Udoudoh and Jibril A. Alhassan

The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of electronic theses and dissertations (ETD) initiatives in the repositories of federal government-owned…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of electronic theses and dissertations (ETD) initiatives in the repositories of federal government-owned universities due to the poor global visibility of ETDs from Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

An explanatory case study empirical research method was adopted for the study. Using an adapted methodology of Ghosh (2009) and multiple data gathering techniques, data was collected based on the three domains of the network of excellence on digital libraries (DELOS) digital library reference model.

Findings

The ETD initiatives in repositories of Nigerian federal universities have not made remarkable progress as digital libraries based on policy, content and system architecture. The specificity of ETDs is not clearly stated in the policies where available. The repositories housing the ETDs are also not compliant with the open archive initiative-protocol for metadata harvesting framework.

Research limitations/implications

The study focussed on ETD initiatives in federal government-owned universities. Although the findings of the study are relevant to other institutions in Nigeria and sub-Saharan Africa. It cannot be used as a basis for the generalisation based on other performance metrics.

Practical implications

This research study concluded that electronic theses and dissertations in Nigerian institutional repositories are not well managed for effective service delivery and long-term accessibility. The ill-management of the ETD initiatives is the reason for the poor global visibility and accessibility of these research output from this part of Africa.

Originality/value

The study assessed ETD initiatives using constructs from a theoretical framework.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Sarika Sawant

The present study aims to investigate various issues concerning the management of institutional repositories (IRs) developed in India.

Downloads
933

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate various issues concerning the management of institutional repositories (IRs) developed in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey method was used. The data collection tool was a web questionnaire, which was created with the help of software provided by surveymonkey.com. The questionnaire was e‐mailed to the entire population i.e. all IRs identified in India.

Findings

It was observed that 79 per cent of the institutions had used the DSpace IR software package. The respondents considered end‐user interface to be the top‐ranking IR‐system feature. It was found that all IRs supported text (HTML, Postscript, PDF, Spreadsheet etc) file formats. Half of the respondents marked bitstream copying as a long‐term preservation strategy. Almost all institutional repositories were OAI‐PMH compliant.

Research limitations/implications

Only Indian IRs were studied and the findings were compared with other studies.

Originality/value

This is the first detailed study focusing on the management aspects of IRs. The present study has identified the existence of 16 functional IRs, some of which were not registered in any of the directories such as ROAR or Open DOAR.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Holly Mercer, Brian Rosenblum and Ada Emmett

The purpose of this paper is to describe the history of KU ScholarWorks, the University of Kansas' institutional repository, and the various strategies used to promote and…

Downloads
1137

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the history of KU ScholarWorks, the University of Kansas' institutional repository, and the various strategies used to promote and populate it.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes how KU ScholarWorks came into being, and discusses the variety of activities employed to publicize the repository and encourage faculty to deposit their work. In addition, the paper discusses some of the concerns expressed by faculty members, and some of the obstacles encountered in getting them to use the repository. The paper concludes with some observations about KU's efforts, an assessment of the success of the program to date, and suggests some next steps the program may take.

Findings

The paper found that KU ScholarWorks has relied on a “self‐archiving” model, which requires regular communication with faculty and long‐term community building. Repository content continues to grow at a steady pace, but uptake among faculty has been slow. In the absence of mandates requiring faculty to deposit work, organizations running institutional repositories must continue to aggressively pursue a variety of strategies to promote repositories to faculty and encourage them to deposit their scholarship.

Originality/value

KU's experience will help other institutions develop institutional repositories by providing examples of marketing strategies, and by promoting a greater understanding of faculty behavior and concerns with regard to institutional repositories.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Rebecca Mary Marsh

This paper aims to uncover the central purposes of institutional repositories, how developments are being affected by policies and researcher behaviour and also what…

Downloads
2784

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the central purposes of institutional repositories, how developments are being affected by policies and researcher behaviour and also what services and approaches are appropriate in supporting repositories from those partners involved in scholarly communication with a particular focus on services that support the publication of research.

Design/methodology/approach

The research reviews the literature and current practices within higher education with regard to the core purposes of institutional repositories, the possible causes of low population of repositories in some institutions and subject disciplines, how this is being addressed and likely future developments. A qualitative survey using semi-structured interviews explores current best practices and tests the specific research questions that emerged from the literature review.

Findings

The rate at which institutional repositories have grown in number has been very fast in recent years, but the population of repositories with research has been relatively slow. The research identified a number of reasons as to why the population of repositories was likely to accelerate in the future and have a more significant impact on scholarly communication. The main catalysts are: strengthening of national and funder policies that serve to both mandate open access (green or gold) and raise awareness of open access amongst faculty; the alignment of repositories with current research information systems within universities; and the development of metadata and open archives initiative harvesting that will improve discoverability and usage data.

Research limitations/implications

As many of the issues around the development of repositories centre on the attitudes of faculty, it would also provide an interesting extension to the research to understand their views of the role of institutional repositories, too.

Practical implications

The study presents a number of possible new ways of working by both information professionals and publishers to improve scholarly communication through the inclusion of research within institutional repositories and how perceived barriers could be overcome.

Social implications

The study provides guidance on how the communication of scholarly research could be improved and reach a wider audience. This, in turn, will benefit researchers, corporate organisations and the public at large.

Originality/value

The paper provides a review of current best practices in managing institutional repositories and identifies new ways of addressing some of the perceived barriers to populating repositories and the benefits for each stakeholder in the scholarly communication process.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000