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1 – 10 of over 5000
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Pierre Eric Christian Johansson, Lennart Malmsköld, Åsa Fast-Berglund and Lena Moestam

The purpose of this paper is to describe challenges the manufacturing industry is currently facing when developing future assembly information systems. More specific, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe challenges the manufacturing industry is currently facing when developing future assembly information systems. More specific, this paper focuses on the handling of assembly information from manufacturing engineering to the shop floor operators.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies have been conducted within one case company between 2014 and 2017. To broaden the perspective, interviews with additionally 17 large and global manufacturing companies and 3 industry experts have been held. Semi-structured interviews have been the main data collection method alongside observations and web questionnaires.

Findings

Six focus areas have been defined which address important challenges in the manufacturing industry. For manual assembly intense manufacturing company, challenges such as IT challenges, process challenges, assembly process disturbances, information availability, technology and process control, and assembly work instructions have been identified and hinder implementation of Industry 4.0 (I4.0).

Originality/value

This longitudinal study provides a current state analysis of the challenges the manufacturing industry is facing when handling assembly information. Despite the vast amount of initiatives within I4.0 and digitalization, this paper argues that the manufacturing industry needs to address the six defined focus areas to become more flexible and prepared for the transition toward a digitalized manufacturing industry.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Hugo Medellin, Jonathan Corney, James Ritchie and Theodore Lim

This paper aims to investigate automatic assembly planning for robot and manual assembly.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate automatic assembly planning for robot and manual assembly.

Design/methodology/approach

The octree decomposition technique is applied to approximate a computer‐aided design model with an octree representation which is then used to generate robot and manual assembly plans. An assembly planning system able to generate assembly plans was developed to build these prototype models.

Findings

Octree decomposition is an effective assembly planning tool. Assembly plans can automatically be generated for robot and manual assembly using octree models.

Research limitations/implications

One disadvantage of the octree decomposition technique is that it approximates a part model with cubes instead of using the actual model. This limits its use and applications when complex assemblies must be planned, but in the context of prototyping can allow a rough component to be formed which can later be finished by hand.

Practical implications

Assembly plans can be generated using octree decomposition, however, new algorithms must be developed to overcome its limitations.

Originality/value

This paper has proved that the octree decomposition technique is an effective assembly planning tool. As a result, an assembly planning system has been developed. Assembly plans for automatic and manual assembly can be generated automatically by the proposed system, which is a novelty since there are no fully automatic assembly planning systems for manual assembly reported in the literature.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Satyandra K. Gupta, Christiaan J.J. Paredis, Rajarishi Sinha and Peter F. Brown

Because of the intense competition in the current global economy, a company must conceive, design, and manufacture new products quickly and inexpensively. The design cycle…

1631

Abstract

Because of the intense competition in the current global economy, a company must conceive, design, and manufacture new products quickly and inexpensively. The design cycle can be shortened through simulation. Rapid technical advances in many different areas of scientific computing provide the enabling technologies for creating a comprehensive simulation and visualization environment for assembly design and planning. An intelligent environment has been built in which simple simulation tools can be composed into complex simulations for detecting potential assembly problems. The goal in this research is to develop high fidelity assembly simulation and visualization tools that can detect assembly related problems without going through physical mock‐ups. In addition, these tools can be used to create easy‐to‐visualize instructions for performing assembly and service operations.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Cornelia Gerdenitsch, Thomas Meneweger, Christina Stockreiter, Paul Butterer, Martina Halbwachs and Daniel Scheiblhofer

The deployment of assistive technologies affects well-being and productivity at industrial workplaces. Augmented reality (AR) is one of these technologies that has become…

Abstract

Purpose

The deployment of assistive technologies affects well-being and productivity at industrial workplaces. Augmented reality (AR) is one of these technologies that has become increasingly deployed in manufacturing facilities to assist employees on the shopfloor. This paper aims to shed light on users’ experiences with AR-based assistance systems, specifically on the sense of autonomy users experience during an AR-assisted assembly task. Based on that, this paper draws implications for the design of future industrial workplaces to improve workers’ health, well-being and productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a laboratory experiment with 117 participants. Within semi-structured interviews, the authors asked the participants about their general experience, as well as their sense of autonomy and responsibility.

Findings

The study results indicate a limited perception of autonomy. Connected to this, the participants took over a passive working attitude and experienced a limited sense of responsibility concerning the output of the AR-assisted assembly task. At the same time, however, the participants still attributed assembly errors internally.

Originality/value

AR-assistance holds both benefits and risks for worker’s health, well-being and productivity. With this study, the author aims to increase the understanding about the perception of autonomy and control at industrial workplaces. Thus, the authors conclude with design implications for developing and implementing assistive technologies in a way that beneficial effects for employees can be achieved.

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Djordje Vukelic, Gordana Ostojic, Stevan Stankovski, Milovan Lazarevic, Branko Tadic, Janko Hodolic and Nenad Simeunovic

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach for identification of machining fixtures, and their elements in an assembly/disassembly process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach for identification of machining fixtures, and their elements in an assembly/disassembly process.

Design/methodology/approach

Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is applied to identification of physical machining fixtures and their basic elements.

Findings

Based on comprehensive testing in industrial conditions it was established by this research that the use of RFID technology contributes to significant reduction of assembly/disassembly time of machining fixtures.

Practical implications

Practical applicability of RFID technology is emphasized and demonstrated in the paper. The suggested system is proven superior in comparison with conventional methods for identification of fixtures/fixture elements which qualifies it for real industrial application.

Originality/value

To the best of authors' knowledge there are no previous reports of successful application of RFID technology on identification of fixtures/fixture elements.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Siavash Javadi, Jessica Bruch and Monica Bellgran

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can…

1103

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review and a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

Findings

The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

Practical implications

This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

Originality/value

Whereas there is a significant body of work about product introduction process in high-volume manufacturing industries, the research on characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries is limited.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

The recent conference on electronics assembly held in Santa Clara by the US Institute of Industrial Engineers stressed the need for computer integration although it…

Abstract

The recent conference on electronics assembly held in Santa Clara by the US Institute of Industrial Engineers stressed the need for computer integration although it featured more theory than practice. Anna Kochan reports.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Wire harness fabrication is extremely labour intensive. Previous attempts to automate the process have used X‐Y tables and have only been partially successful due to…

Abstract

Wire harness fabrication is extremely labour intensive. Previous attempts to automate the process have used X‐Y tables and have only been partially successful due to limited degrees of freedom. Unimation has demonstrated the feasibility of using a robot to integrate the wire termination, insertion, routing and testing operations into a single manufacturing system.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Chengjun Chen, Zhongke Tian, Dongnian Li, Lieyong Pang, Tiannuo Wang and Jun Hong

This study aims to monitor and guide the assembly process. The operators need to change the assembly process according to the products’ specifications during manual…

291

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to monitor and guide the assembly process. The operators need to change the assembly process according to the products’ specifications during manual assembly of mass customized production. Traditional information inquiry and display methods, such as manual lookup of assembly drawings or electronic manuals, are inefficient and error-prone.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a projection-based augmented reality system (PBARS) for assembly guidance and monitoring. The system includes a projection method based on viewpoint tracking, in which the position of the operator’s head is tracked and the projection images are changed correspondingly. The assembly monitoring phase applies a method for parts recognition. First, the pixel local binary pattern (PX-LBP) operator is achieved by merging the classical LBP operator with the pixel classification process. Afterward, the PX-LBP features of the depth images are extracted and the randomized decision forests classifier is used to get the pixel classification prediction image (PCPI). Parts recognition and assembly monitoring is performed by PCPI analysis.

Findings

The projection image changes with the viewpoint of the human body, hence the operators always perceive the three-dimensional guiding scene from different viewpoints, improving the human-computer interaction. Part recognition and assembly monitoring were achieved by comparing the PCPIs, in which missing and erroneous assembly can be detected online.

Originality/value

This paper designed the PBARS to monitor and guide the assembly process simultaneously, with potential applications in mass customized production. The parts recognition and assembly monitoring based on pixels classification provides a novel method for assembly monitoring.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Stephen Fox

There has been little explicit consideration of do‐it‐yourself (DIY) in previous manufacturing literature. This may be because traditional DIY is an outlet for physical…

1436

Abstract

Purpose

There has been little explicit consideration of do‐it‐yourself (DIY) in previous manufacturing literature. This may be because traditional DIY is an outlet for physical goods that are made‐to‐forecast, such as boats kits for self‐assembly and personal use. However, since the beginning of the twenty‐first century, DIY has extended to the invention and the sale of physical goods, as well as their assembly and use. The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the manufacturing literature by providing an analysis of DIY invention and production of physical goods for use or sale (new‐DIY paradigm).

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review related to DIY invention and production of physical goods for use or sale; and its differences with the existing paradigm for creating physical goods: including enabling technologies and enabling thinking.

Findings

DIY invention and production is able to create physical goods, which are both original and economical, through open, distributed, minimal processes. Within the existing paradigm, by contrast, physical goods are created, which are either original or economical, through processes that are less open, less distributed, and less minimal than the processes of new‐DIY.

Practical implications

DIY invention, production, and sale of physical goods deploys technologies that are used within the existing paradigm for creating physical goods. The difference in outcomes is due to the different conceptualization of invention, production, and sales within the established paradigm.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is that it provides an analysis of key aspects of DIY invention, production, and sales. The value of the paper is that it provides a starting point for researchers and practitioners seeking to determine how practices, technologies, and challenges of the existing paradigm can be related to DIY opportunities.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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