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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Mahmood Reza Khabbazi, Jan Wikander, Mauro Onori and Antonio Maffei

This paper introduces a schema for the product assembly feature data in an object-oriented and module-based format using Unified Modeling Language (UML). To link…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces a schema for the product assembly feature data in an object-oriented and module-based format using Unified Modeling Language (UML). To link production with product design, it is essential to determine at an early stage which entities of product design and development are involved and used at the automated assembly planning and operations. To this end, it is absolutely reasonable to assign meaningful attributes to the parts’ design entities (assembly features) in a systematic and structured way. As such, this approach empowers processes such as motion planning and sequence planning in assembly design.

Design/methodology/approach

The assembly feature data requirements are studied and definitions are analyzed and redefined. Using object-oriented techniques, the assembly feature data structure and relationships are modeled based on the identified requirements as five UML packages (Part, three-dimensional (3D) models, Mating, Joint and Handling). All geometric and non-geometric design data entities endorsed with assembly design perspective are extracted or assigned from 3D models and realized through the featured entity interface class. The featured entities are then associated (used) with the mating, handling and joints features. The AssemblyFeature interface is realized through mating, handling and joint packages related to the assembly and part classes. Each package contains all relevant classes which further classify the important attributes of the main class.

Findings

This paper sets out to provide an explanatory approach using object-oriented techniques to model the schema of assembly features association and artifacts at the product design level, all of which are essential in several subsequent and parallel steps of the assembly planning process, as well as assembly feature entity assignments in design improvement cycle.

Practical implications

The practical implication based on the identified advantages can be classified in three main features: module-based design, comprehensive classification, integration. These features help the automation and solution development processes based on the proposed models much easier and systematic.

Originality/value

The proposed schema’s comprehensiveness and reliability are verified through comparisons with other works and the advantages are discussed in detail.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Wen‐Chieh Chuang and Peter O’Grady

Propoes a methodology that enables a dynamic and interactive 3‐Dvisualization model of the assembly process to be developed from the CAD files of each part in the assembly

Abstract

Propoes a methodology that enables a dynamic and interactive 3‐Dvisualization model of the assembly process to be developed from the CAD files of each part in the assembly. Makes three main contributions to the research in this area. First, a taxonomy of features for assembly is presented. Second, a process model for generating interactive 3D models of the assembly process is developed and, third, a new algorithm for creating a dynamic assembly model is derived. This algorithm, called the 3D assembly visualization (3AV) algorithm, involves instantiating the motion attributes that specify the motion of each part in the assembly. This dynamic assembly model is then converted to a 3‐D renderable format for visualization. An example is presented that uses virtual reality modeling language (VRML) as the 3‐D representation language. The result is a dynamic and interactive visual representation of the assembly operation. Such visualization can be of considerable use in DFA.

Details

International Journal of Agile Management Systems, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1465-4652

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Hong Xiao, Yuan Li, Jian-Feng Yu and Hui Cheng

Virtual assembly process plays an important role in assembly design of complex product and is typically time- and resource-intensive. This paper aims to investigate a…

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual assembly process plays an important role in assembly design of complex product and is typically time- and resource-intensive. This paper aims to investigate a dynamic assembly simplification approach in order to demonstrate and interact with virtual assembly process of complex product in real time.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed approach regards the virtual assembly process of complex product as an incremental growth process of dynamic assembly. During the growth process, the current-assembled-state assembly model is simplified with appearance preserved by detecting and removing its invisible features, and the to-be-assembled components are simplified with assembly features preserved using conjugated subgraphs matching method based on an improved subgraph isomorphism algorithm.

Findings

The dynamic assembly simplification approach is applied successfully to reduce the complexity of computer aided design models during the virtual assembly process and it is proved by several cases.

Originality/value

A new assembly features definition is proposed based on the notion of “conjugation” to assist the assembly features recognition, which is a main step of the dynamic assembly simplification and has been translated into conjugated subgraphs matching problem. And an improved subgraph isomorphism algorithm is presented to address this problem.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Shantanu Kumar Das and Abinash Kumar Swain

This paper aims to present the classification, representation and extraction of adhesively bonded assembly features (ABAFs) from the computer-aided design (CAD) model.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the classification, representation and extraction of adhesively bonded assembly features (ABAFs) from the computer-aided design (CAD) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The ABAFs are represented as a set of faces with a characteristic arrangement among the faces among parts in proximity suitable for adhesive bonding. The characteristics combination of the faying surfaces and their topological relationships help in classification of ABAFs. The ABAFs are classified into elementary and compound types based on the number of assembly features exist at the joint location.

Findings

A set of algorithms is developed to extract and identify the ABAFs from CAD model. Typical automotive and aerospace CAD assembly models have been used to illustrate and validate the proposed approach.

Originality/value

New classification and extraction methods for ABAFs are proposed, which are useful for variant design.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Yan Pang, Andrew Y.C. Nee, Soh Khim Ong, Miaolong Yuan and Kamal Youcef‐Toumi

This paper aims to apply the augmented reality (AR) technology to assembly design in the early design stage. A proof‐of‐concept system with AR interface is developed.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply the augmented reality (AR) technology to assembly design in the early design stage. A proof‐of‐concept system with AR interface is developed.

Design/methodology/approach

Through AR interface, designers can design the assembly on the real assembly platform. The system helps users to design the assembly features to provide proper part‐part constraints in the early design stage. The virtual assembly features are rendered on the real assembly platform using AR registration techniques. The new evaluated assembly parts can be generated in the AR interface and assembled to assembly platform through assembly features. The model‐based collision detection technique is implemented for assembly constraint evaluation.

Findings

With AR interface, it would be possible to combine some of the benefits of both physical and virtual prototyping (VP). The AR environment can save a lot of computation resource compared to a totally virtual environment. Working on real assembly platform, designers have more realistic feel and the ability to design an assembly in a more intuitive way.

Research limitations/implications

More interaction tools need to be developed to support the complex assembly design efficiently.

Practical implications

The presented system encourages designers to consider the assembly issues in the early design stage. The primitive 3D models of assembly parts with proper part‐part constraints are generated using the system before doing detailed geometry design.

Originality/value

A new markerless registration approach for AR system is presented. This generic approach can be also used for other AR applications.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Suat Genc, Robert W. Messler and Gary A. Gabriele

A formalized, systematic approach to product design, using integral snap‐fit features to accomplish assembly was revealed in the first six parts of this series of papers…

Abstract

A formalized, systematic approach to product design, using integral snap‐fit features to accomplish assembly was revealed in the first six parts of this series of papers. This final part applies the developed methodology to a case study, thereby familiarising readers with use of the methodology in practical design situations.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Robert W. Messler, Suat Genc and Gary A. Gabriele

Suggests that, without question, while every step in a systematic approach to the design of parts for assembly using integral snap‐fit features is important, none is more…

Abstract

Suggests that, without question, while every step in a systematic approach to the design of parts for assembly using integral snap‐fit features is important, none is more important than selecting locking features. After all, it is these features that hold the assembly together. While quite different in appearance and details of their operation, all integral locking features comprise a latch and a catch component to create a locking pair. Proper, no less optimum, function requires that such locking pairs be selected using a systematic approach. Presents that approach as a six‐step methodology, but first, defines and describes latch and catch components, bringing order to their apparent boundless variety. Demonstrates the utility of the methodology with a real‐life case study.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Arun Mathew and C.S.P. Rao

The information and knowledge about a product and its assembly are necessary to generate all feasible assembly sequences of that product. Assemblies contain a very large…

Abstract

Purpose

The information and knowledge about a product and its assembly are necessary to generate all feasible assembly sequences of that product. Assemblies contain a very large amount of information and complex relationships. Identifying assembled parts as well as their contact surfaces is very important in design and manufacturing since this information is essential. The problem is to not only make the information available but also use the relevant information for making decisions, especially determination of the optimum assembly sequence. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes a system for processing assembly models and extracting assembly related data using application programming interface (API) of the computer‐aided design (CAD) software. These data are used to identify the relationships between different components of an assembly thus encouraging generation of feasible assembly sequences.

Findings

Instead of total human interpretation of the assembly design, a direct CAD database interface approach has been proposed to extract the relation with minimal manual involvement. The information extracted is used to generate a list describing the links between the assembled parts, the involved features and the type of link explicitly to facilitate assembly analysis and planning.

Originality/value

The methodology of using the API of the CAD modeling package SolidWorks, is a novel approach in which the assembly mate information is captured. Instead of total human interpretation of the assembly design, a direct CAD database interface approach has been proposed to extract the relation with minimal manual involvement.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

C. Xiong, Y. Rong, R.P. Koganti, M.J. Zaluzec and N. Wang

This paper develops the statistical error analysis model for assembling, to derive measures of controlling the geometric variations in assembly with multiple assembly

Abstract

This paper develops the statistical error analysis model for assembling, to derive measures of controlling the geometric variations in assembly with multiple assembly stations, and to provide a statistical tolerance prediction/distribution toolkit integrated with CAD system for responding quickly to market opportunities with reduced manufacturing costs and improved quality. First the homogeneous transformation is used to describe the location and orientation of assembly features, parts and other related surfaces. The desired location and orientation, and the related fixturing configuration (including locator position and orientation) are automatically extracted from CAD models. The location and orientation errors are represented with differential transformations. The statistical error prediction model is formulated and the related algorithms integrated with the CAD system so that the complex geometric information can be directly accessed. In the prediction model, the manufacturing process (joining) error, induced by heat deformation in welding, is taken into account.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Robert W. Messler, Suat Genc and Gary A. Gabriele

The third part of a comprehensive six‐part series on a promising and growing approach to mechanical attachment amenable to automation. Integral snap‐fit attachment design…

Abstract

The third part of a comprehensive six‐part series on a promising and growing approach to mechanical attachment amenable to automation. Integral snap‐fit attachment design has traditionally focused almost exclusively on the individual features that actually accomplish locking between parts of an assembly (e.g. cantilever hooks, bayonet‐fingers, compressive hooks, traps, and others). The placement and orientation of features that facilitate or enhance engagement or eliminate unwanted translation, rotation or vibration, i.e. locating features and enhancements, are rarely considered. Here, describes integral features classified as locks, locators or enhancements. More importantly, presents a systematic six‐step approach or methodology to guide designers at the higher, attachment or conceptual design level (as opposed to lower, feature or detail design level).

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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