Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

38

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

62

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jon Rigelsford

74

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Gregory W Holcomb

Examines the use of robots for printed circuit board assembly withparticular reference to the growing trend of mixing surface‐mount andthrough‐hole technology on to a…

237

Abstract

Examines the use of robots for printed circuit board assembly with particular reference to the growing trend of mixing surface‐mount and through‐hole technology on to a single board. Describes the flexibility of today’s robotic cells, with one system capable of assembling a range of PCBs, making changes to board assembly by changing the software instead of the hardware. Looks at the various end effectors for robotic assembly of PCBs, including a new type of gripper which can handle all variations of circuit boards without having to make tooling or gripper changes.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Alexander Gerybadze and André Slowak

The competence-based management approach has shed light on how firms represent open systems that link assets, strategic logic, and capabilities in order to create new…

Abstract

The competence-based management approach has shed light on how firms represent open systems that link assets, strategic logic, and capabilities in order to create new competences. Nonetheless, we find that there are too few empirical studies that illustrate how competences are distributed within an industry. The following case study is based on an in-depth analysis of innovation and standards-formation in industrial automation. Two examples, the standard-setting community PROFIBUS and the field bus-related sensor consortium IO-Link are used to analyze partnership arrangements and competence-distribution patterns.

This study is based on qualitative interviews and it uses patent data to judge competences of a standard-setting community's partner firms. Referring to the empirical case of IO-Link, we show how the integrator firms’ competence-leveraging can be significantly affected by new technology approaches that reason a novel deployment of capabilities. It seems that the deployment of resources depends not only on industry segmentation, but also on the firms’ coordinated agenda concerning innovative, new functionality of a given standard. Our patent analysis also mirrors the variety of knowledge within a standard-setting community. Furthermore, we develop a concept of layered business systems, that is, a terminology of knowledge, organizational, and technology domains. Standard-setting communities bundle complementarity assets, they make their member firms create both proprietary and open technology, and they integrate knowledge across industry boundaries.

Details

A Focussed Issue on Identifying, Building, and Linking Competences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-990-9

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Paul G. Ranky

This paper aims to introduce novel linear synchronous motor (LSM) driven assembly automation and material handling system designs with examples.

1156

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce novel linear synchronous motor (LSM) driven assembly automation and material handling system designs with examples.

Design/methodology/approach

Discusses novel LSM technology principles with some practical system design and configuration examples for automated assembly and material handling. The high energy density and rugged design offers high duty cycle, high power, rapid acceleration, improved speed, high positioning repeatability, and increased performance for demanding installations.

Findings

LSMs can increase throughput, reliability and payload information feedback. They can also decrease maintenance requirements, and the total cost of installation. MagneMotion's patented QuickStick system propels and controls each vehicle independently by interacting with a permanent magnet array mounted to each vehicle. As a consequence, the vehicles do not require communication or power cables, allowing a broad range of flexible, reconfigurable configurations and move profiles.

Practical implications

LSMs can increase throughput, reliability and payload information feedback. They can also decrease maintenance requirements, and the total cost of installation.

Originality/value

Discusses novel LSM technology principles with some practical system design and configuration examples for automated assembly and material handling.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

70

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Joanne Pransky

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a prominent, robotic industry engineer-turned entrepreneur regarding his pioneering efforts in the industrial robot industry and the commercialization and challenges of bringing robotic inventions to market. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Brian Carlisle, President and Co-founder of Precise Automation, a robot manufacturer that specializes in collaborative robots. Carlisle discusses the highlights of his 40-year career that led to groundbreaking innovations in small parts assembly and handling robots, along with some of the challenges. He also shares his thoughts on the future of the industry.

Findings

Brian Carlisle received his BS and MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University. After Stanford, Carlisle and colleague Dr Bruce Shimano worked for Vicarm, a three-person company started by robotics pioneer Victor Scheinman. Vicarm was sold to Unimation and Carlisle became Unimation’s Director of R&D where he and his team developed the PUMA™ series of electric robots and grew sales from $0 to $40m in five years. In 1983, Carlisle and Shimano co-founded Adept Technology and as its CEO for 20 years, Carlisle grew Adept to over $100m in robot sales. In 2004, Carlisle co-founded with Shimano, Precise Automation, and is the President and CEO.

Originality/value

Brian Carlisle is a pioneer of the small parts assembly and handling robot. He was one of the key members of the team that developed the PUMA™ robot for Unimation. The PUMA™ robot was the watershed product that launched the assembly robot business in the USA and Europe. At Adept, he led the design of the first Direct Drive SCARA Robot and under his helm, Precise Automation introduced the first commercially available collaborative robots. Carlisle was President of the Robotic Industries Association for three years, is the recipient of the Joseph Engelberger Award for Leadership in Robotics, and an elected IEEE Fellow. He has served on the Board of the National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, the Boards of the National Center for Manufacturing Science, the Automation Forum of NEMA and is a founding member of the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative. He holds multiple patents for robot designs.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Heping Chen, George Zhang, William Eakins and Thomas Fuhlbrigge

The purpose of this paper is to develop an intelligent robot assembly system for the moving production line. Moving production lines are widely used in many manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an intelligent robot assembly system for the moving production line. Moving production lines are widely used in many manufacturing factories, including automotive and general industries. Industrial robots are hardly used to perform any tasks on the moving production lines. One of the main reasons is that it is difficult for conventional industrial robots to adjust to any sort of change. Therefore, more intelligent industrial robotic systems have to be developed to adopt the random motion of the moving production lines. This paper presents an intelligent robotics system that performs an assembly process while the object is moving, using synergic combination of visual servoing and force control technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The developed intelligent robotic system includes some rules to ensure the success of the assembly processes. Also visual servoing and force control are used to deal with the random motion of the moving objects. Since the objects on the moving production lines are moving with random speed, visual servoing is adopted to tracking the motion of the moving object. Force control is also integrated to control the motion of the robot and keep the robotic system compliant with the moving objects to avoid the damage of the whole system.

Findings

The developed intelligent robotic technology has been successfully implemented. The wheel loading process is used as example.

Research limitations/implications

Since the developed technology is based on the low‐level motion control, safety has to be considered. Currently, it is done by motion supervision.

Practical implications

The developed technology can be used to perform assemblies in the moving production lines. Since the developed platform is based on the synergic combination of visual servoing and force control technology, it can be used in other areas, such as seam tracking and seat loading, etc.

Originality/value

This paper provides a practical solution of performing assemblies on the moving production lines, which is not available on the current industrial robot market.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

M.V.A. Raju Bahubalendruni, Anil Gulivindala, Manish Kumar, Bibhuti Bhusan Biswal and Lakshumu Naidu Annepu

The purpose of this paper is to develop an efficient hybrid method that can collectively address assembly sequence generation (ASG) and exploded view generation (EVG…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an efficient hybrid method that can collectively address assembly sequence generation (ASG) and exploded view generation (EVG) problem effectively. ASG is an act of finding feasible collision free movement of components of a mechanical product in accordance with the assembly design. Although the execution of ASG is complex and time-consuming in calculation, it is highly essential for efficient manufacturing process. Because of numerous limitations of the ASG algorithms, a definite method is still unavailable in the computer-aided design (CAD) software, and therefore the explosion of the product is not found to be in accordance with any feasible disassembly sequence (disassembly sequence is reverse progression of assembly sequence). The existing EVG algorithms in the CAD software result in visualization of the entire constituent parts of the product over single screen without taking into consideration the feasible order of assembly operations; thus, it becomes necessary to formulate an algorithm which effectively solves ASG and EVG problem in conjugation. This requirement has also been documented as standard in the “General Information Concerning Patents: 1.84 Standards for drawings” in the United States Patent and Trademark office (2005) which states that the exploded view created for any product should show the relationship or order of assembly of various parts that are permissible.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a unique ASG method has been proposed and is further extended for EVG. The ASG follows a deterministic approach to avoid redundant data collection and calculation. The proposed method is effectively applied on products which require such feasible paths of disassembly other than canonical directions.

Findings

The method is capable of organizing the assembly operations as linear or parallel progression of assembly such that the assembly task is completed in minimum number of stages. This result is further taken for EVG and is found to be proven effective.

Originality/value

Assembly sequence planning (ASP) is performed most of the times considering the geometric feasibility along canonical axes without considering parallel possibility of assembly operations. In this paper, the proposed method is robust to address this issue. Exploded view generation considering feasible ASP is also one of the novel approaches illustrated in this paper.

1 – 10 of over 1000