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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Jasmine Leby Lau, Ahmad Hariza Hashim, Asnarulkhadi Abu Samah and Azizah Salim Syed Salim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensionality of the environmental concern scale (NEP) and to understand the environmental worldviews of Malaysian project managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensionality of the environmental concern scale (NEP) and to understand the environmental worldviews of Malaysian project managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among developer organisations registered with Real Estate and Housing Developers’ Association Malaysia in Klang Valley. Response was obtained from project managers and the final sample collected was 87 cases, representing a response rate of 24.5 per cent. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation was conducted to investigate the underlying structure of the NEP items while frequency distribution for the data set was used to gauge the environmental worldviews of the respondents. In addition, face-to-face interviews were carried out to gather more information to complements the findings of quantitative analyses.

Findings

Five factors were extracted but due to heavy cross-loadings, two items from the original scale were dropped, reducing it to be a 13-item scale. The four factors retained explained 61.6 per cent of the variance and were duly named Human over nature, ecocrisis, rights of nature and limits of growth. High scores on both pro-NEP and pro-dominant social paradigm items revealed the co-existence of both ecological and utilitarian view of the environment among project managers. Similar outcome was obtained from interviews with project managers where they indicated efforts in finding compatibility between protecting the environment and exploiting natural resources for development.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was restricted to housing developers in Klang Valley, thus the findings cannot be generalised to all developer organisations or other construction occupational groups.

Practical implications

This research supported the multidimensionality claim of the environmental scale (NEP) where four distinctive dimensions were identified. The usage of individual subscales in understanding environmental beliefs may reveal interesting patterns in that each dimension could have positive and negative connotations on human behaviours. In addition, the co-existence of both an ecological and a utilitarian view of the environment revealed that these worldviews align well with sustainable development principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few local studies that attempt to understand the environmental worldviews of project managers.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sulistyo Prabowo, Azmawani Abd Rahman, Suhaimi Ab Rahman and Asnarulkhadi Abu Samah

This study aims to explore various factors that hamper halal certification in food service industries in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. World halal business as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore various factors that hamper halal certification in food service industries in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. World halal business as well as awareness in halal products and services consumption has been growing rapidly for the past few years. However, many industry players have not yet realized those huge potential concepts of halal business. Food service industries such as restaurants and caterings show less concern in putting priority on the issue of halal certification.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative data collection technique called nominal group technique (NGT) was used in this study. Four categories of stakeholders participated in this NGT to represent certifying body, consumers, industry player and government. Each category was given a fundamental question: “What factors are hindering restaurant and catering in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, in obtaining halal certification?”

Findings

The authors found that through NGT, the authors can obtain top priority issues to be followed up by the respecting institutions which are concerned. The lack of socialization and information have led to the lack of knowledge and awareness. This is the most important issue addressed by the participants.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted to collect data from various stakeholders in East Kalimantan Province of Indonesia. Considering the vast expanse of Indonesia and different level of development in each province, results of this study could not be generalized as Indonesia situation in general.

Practical implications

Halal certification in food service industry gains low interest from industries. This research presents hampering factors in various perspectives and offers some suggestions to overcome those issues accordingly.

Originality/value

It is hard to find research paper discussing halal management from the Indonesian perspective. This paper extends the use of NGT in halal management with the perspectives from many stakeholders in food service industries. It provides a relatively new finding from the Indonesian point of view.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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