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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Kyuho Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how underlying globalization could influence Asian consumers' wine drinking patterns and behaviors. Specifically, a theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how underlying globalization could influence Asian consumers' wine drinking patterns and behaviors. Specifically, a theoretical framework that explains the underlying motivations of Asian wine consumers is developed.

Design/methodology/approach

A broad range of literature is reviewed in an attempt to develop a theoretical framework for the impacts of globalization on the Asian wine market.

Findings

Three key forces that drive change in the Asian wine markets are identified; these changes explain the explosive growth of wine consumption in Asian countries.

Research limitations/implications

A theoretical framework is developed in an effort to explain the impacts of globalization on Asian wine consumption. Therefore, no empirical tests are conducted to validate the theoretical framework. Future studies could test the theoretical model by conducting an empirical study.

Practical implications

Multi‐faceted global progress in terms of economic, technological, and socio‐cultural influences has influenced Asian consumers' wine consumption positively. Therefore, Asian consumers' wine consumption will continue to grow significantly. A theoretical framework that explains the relationship between the progress of globalization and wine consumption in Asia is developed. This framework will help international wine marketers better understand the recent rapid growth of wine consumption in Asia.

Originality/value

This is the first research that attempts to investigate how globalization has affected the Asian wine market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Armando Maria Corsi, Nicola Marinelli and Veronica Alampi Sottini

The paper aims to analyse the current situation and the perspectives of Italian wine in key Asian export markets – China, Japan, India, Singapore and South Korea. These…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyse the current situation and the perspectives of Italian wine in key Asian export markets – China, Japan, India, Singapore and South Korea. These countries show the highest growing rates in wine consumption and are forecasted to become increasingly more strategic for Italian wine producers.

Design/methodology/approach

A SWOT analysis is applied to the most recent set of secondary data available from the Italian National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT), the Italian National Institute for Foreign Trade (ICE), the International Organisation of Wine and Vine (OIV) and Euromonitor International reports.

Findings

The study reveals that the most interesting markets for Italian wines are China and South Korea. The key strengths are mainly related to high quality products, evoking classic values and being perceived as a status symbol, while the main concerns for Italian wines are mainly related to promotion and distribution issues.

Research limitations/implications

The SWOT analysis can be used to develop a strategy that takes into consideration the potential strengths and opportunities and the impact of weaknesses and threats, but it cannot cover all the possible aspects Italian wineries must know about Asian markets. It offers a base for further and deeper thoughts about the how to succeed in the most dynamic and challenging markets of the next 20 years.

Originality/value

Differently from other studies, which tend to analyse Italian perspectives in Asian markets on a country‐by‐country basis, this work represents the most recent and comprehensive research on Italian wines in Asian markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Martin Kunc

The purpose of this paper is to analyse consumer buying behaviour in the Japanese rice wine, also known as sake market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse consumer buying behaviour in the Japanese rice wine, also known as sake market.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies a novel qualitative and quantitative analytical methodology to an off-license channel in Japan. The methodology involves the use of anchoring-and-adjustment theory and simulation to a large set of point of sale data. The selection of the brands used for the study are more than 230 brands and more than 150 sake breweries.

Findings

Age and gender are important factors determining recurrent patterns of purchasing behaviour. Small size packaging, e.g. one cup, has the highest volume in sales, for example, convenience shopping, but it depends on exogenous factors, e.g. summer season or festive events.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are related with the lack of specific personal data from consumers that impedes to test behavioural attitudes driving loyalty to brands. Anchoring-and-adjustment theory can be a valid approach to evaluate large longitudinal data sets of purchasing behaviour.

Practical implications

Results indicate that fragmented markets tend to over-expand the assortment affecting volume stability. However, this dynamics is difficult to avoid when all participants are engaged in this behaviour and the market is strongly segmented by age and gender.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the body of knowledge of buyer behaviour in relation to purchasing and consumption for other types of wine. It is the first application in alcoholic beverages of anchor-and-adjustment theory.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Angelo A. Camillo

The purpose of this paper is to determine consumer characteristics, buying behaviour, and the factors that influence the Chinese wine consumer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine consumer characteristics, buying behaviour, and the factors that influence the Chinese wine consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies qualitative and quantitative methodology, together with a literature review and a strategic environmental scan of the Chinese wine market and consumer behavior.

Findings

Consumer education, wine‐related activities, channels of communication, taste, country of origin, quality, and price rank are found to be important factors influencing the buying and consumption behavior of Chinese consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest that there is a need for stakeholders to develop and implement informational and educational marketing strategies to educate and inform consumers in ways that reflect their needs and expectations according to demographic characteristics.

Practical implications

The challenge for the stakeholders will be to: penetrate this emerging market to establish presence and capture market share; strive for long‐term growth and profit sustainability; create competitive advantage through core competencies; promote and sell quality products applying the principles of yield management “to charge the right price, to the ideal consumer, at the right time, in the right place”; and build brand loyalty.

Social implications

The paper offers useful findings for stakeholders in the wine supply chain. Special attention should be given to the alcoholic beverage retailer and hospitality operators for whom wine revenue is the core of aggregate beverage revenue.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the body of knowledge of consumer behavior in relation to wine consumption in an emerging market. The results benefit players in the wine supply chain; especially retail and hospitality operations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Arthur Donald Brain

The selling of wines is usually performed by a sommelier in the context of an upmarket restaurant. However, many restaurants cannot afford to employ a sommelier and must…

Abstract

Purpose

The selling of wines is usually performed by a sommelier in the context of an upmarket restaurant. However, many restaurants cannot afford to employ a sommelier and must rely on the food and beverage service personnel to assist customers with the selection of wine. The food and beverage service personnel are generally not qualified to do this. Restaurants usually do not provide training with regard to wine knowledge, wine service skills and wine selling skills. The purpose of this paper was to establish whether wine service training had an influence on the wine sales of a restaurant.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental research design used two restaurants from the same franchise. One restaurant was the control group while the other was the experimental group. Wine sales were monitored and recorded for a period of three months, the second month being used for the training intervention of the experimental group.

Findings

Although the results were not statistically significant, the results indicated that wine service training increased the wine sales in the restaurant of the experimental group.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in the South African hospitality sector and establishes that wine service training is a necessity for wine sales to explore further in the restaurant industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Kyuho Lee, Melih Madanoglu, Steve W. Henson and Jae-Youn Ko

Confucian philosophy emphasizes gender roles that place significant restrictions on the consumption of non-traditional products. The authors use wine to advance our…

Abstract

Purpose

Confucian philosophy emphasizes gender roles that place significant restrictions on the consumption of non-traditional products. The authors use wine to advance our understanding of how South Korean female consumers have established a new female gender role and identity by adopting new communities that allow non-traditional consumption while still accepting gender roles. This paper aims to examine how South Korean female consumers create a unique consumption culture with respect to wine consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

A hermeneutic approach was adopted to understand what motivates South Korean female consumers to join a wine consumption community and their perceptions about consuming wine. Researchers conducted 26 semi-structured face-to-face interviews that ranged from 45 to 120 min, with an average duration of 1 h.

Findings

The results of the study suggest that wine can be a medium for emancipating women from traditional gender roles and social images of women embedded in South Korean society that call for women to sacrifice themselves for their families. In addition, the study’s findings suggest that Western wine marketers need to understand the power of wine consumption communities that are a unique consumption ritual among South Korean female wine consumers.

Originality/value

South Korean female respondents drink wine as both a way to seek pleasure through a Western alcoholic beverage and to consume and experience Western culture and lifestyles. However, South Korean female respondents tend to drink wine within consumption communities, which are a powerful consumption ritual in South Korea. In other words, although South Korean female respondents consume wine to experience and learn about Western culture and lifestyles, they have entirely not abandoned their traditional consumption rituals.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

B.W.A. (Ben) Dewald

Wine consumption has increased worldwide by 5.6% since 1994. All the major wine consuming regions have reported increases in consumption: Asia (China, Japan, South Korea…

Abstract

Wine consumption has increased worldwide by 5.6% since 1994. All the major wine consuming regions have reported increases in consumption: Asia (China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore and Taiwan), Northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway) and North America (USA and Canada) have experienced the largest increases of 68%, 29.9% and 23.6% respectively. This study investigates the wine drinking patterns of people in Hong Kong. The findings indicate that nearly half of all local adults have drunk wine over the past year. There was an almost equal distribution between male and female wine‐drinking respondents. Wine‐drinkers in general were found to have higher education levels, better jobs and to earn more money. Half of the wine consumption was found to occur in both Western and Chinese restaurants and surprisingly 40% of the wine was consumed at home. Half of the wine was purchased in local supermarkets. Red wine was much more popular than both white and sparkling wine and the preferred country of origin was France. Hong Kong wine drinkers were, however, found to be infrequent consumers of the product.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Michel Rod, Nick Ellis and Tim Beal

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role and influence of cultural intermediaries in the developing wine markets of Japan and Singapore by taking a discursive view…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role and influence of cultural intermediaries in the developing wine markets of Japan and Singapore by taking a discursive view of relationships amongst these cultural intermediaries, as well as between them and various members of the supply chain in international wine marketing – including consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explore cross‐cultural issues by taking a discursive perspective to studying representations of self, and of inter‐organizational and inter‐personal relationships in the global wine business, specifically through the analysis of a series of accounts of cultural intermediaries and key stakeholders involved in potentially influencing the extent to which New Zealand wines achieve a greater presence in the Japan and Singapore marketplaces.

Findings

In their talk, participants explicitly (and sometimes implicitly) construct “vertical” relationships with downstream and upstream supply chain actors (consumers and producers, respectively) as needing guidance or assistance that seemingly only they are capable of providing. They also construct “horizontal” relations with fellow cultural intermediaries. In these discursive constructions, evaluative positioning often occurs, as the various actors are constructed positively or negatively, depending on the nature of the legitimisation sought by the speaker as they seek to justify their contribution to the network.

Practical implications

The insights gained through an examination of discourse should help B2B practitioners in the increasingly globalising wine industry to navigate through the complexity of emerging wine markets in the Asian context.

Originality/value

The paper's contribution is in looking at these cultural intermediaries as cultural bridges in the context of “sophisticated globalization” in specific Asian societies not traditionally known for wine‐drinking.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Michel Rod and Tim Beal

The purpose of this paper is to explore the developing wine markets of Japan and Singapore for New Zealand (NZ) wine. It is principally an opinion piece with some…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the developing wine markets of Japan and Singapore for New Zealand (NZ) wine. It is principally an opinion piece with some reference to the academic literature, to the trade literature and quite a bit of the authors' own experiences as marketing academics conducting research in East Asia on the growth of wine drinking in this region of the globe.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is atypical in that it is more of a descriptive commentary, or “Viewpoint”, that draws on the literature interspersed with the autoethnographic reflections regarding the experiences in looking at NZ wine in Japan and Singapore as well as drawing on data from face-to-face interviews and focus groups with a variety of participants with knowledge of the global wine industry. Informal meetings were held with individuals representing NZ wineries, Japanese and Singapore wine distributors, restaurant food and beverage managers, wine journalists, wine shop proprietors and sommeliers data. Personal reflections and opinions are interspersed with the trade and academic literature in relation to the exploration of the NZ experience in the wine markets of Japan and Singapore.

Findings

The major finding is that there are marked differences between Japanese and Singaporean consumers and that the adoption of wine drinking or the incorporation of wine into one's non-traditionally wine-drinking society involves individuals who play cultural intermediary roles as communicators and distributors of “cultural products” and as translators of cultural products into meaningful local, consumption experiences. Based on personal observations, there appears to be a functional aspect to this facet of globalisation in that cultural intermediaries facilitate the adoption of wine consumption in emerging Asian markets simply through promoting it as a social accompaniment much like local alcoholic beverages, but also that wine has the capacity to enhance local cuisine.

Practical implications

The insights gained through personal reflection and an examination of perspectives from participants with knowledge of the wine industry in Japan and Singapore should help NZ wine producers with specific knowledge to navigate through the complexity of emerging wine markets in the Asian context.

Originality/value

The contribution is in looking at “sophisticated globalization” in the context of NZ wine producers looking to market a cultural product such as wine to specific Asian societies not traditionally known for wine drinking.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Won Fy Lee, William C. Gartner, Haiyan Song, Byron Marlowe, Jong Woo Choi and Bolormaa Jamiyansuren

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of extrinsic cues on wine consumer’s willingness to pay (WTP) based on a blind tasting experiment conducted in Hong Kong.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of extrinsic cues on wine consumer’s willingness to pay (WTP) based on a blind tasting experiment conducted in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from a three-stage blind wine tasting experiment, the authors examine how an average consumer’s WTP for a bottle of wine changes as a result of knowing prior to tasting extrinsic information such as the country of origin or grape variety of an otherwise identical product.

Findings

The findings of this study align with previous research that finds subjective utility experienced by tasters can be significantly influenced by the belief or information given prior to the tasting. Sub-group analysis using a stratified sample based on the frequency of wine consumption and the wine taster’s prior experience with wine (grouped into expert and novice categories) suggests that it is the novice consumers that have a stronger response to the pre-tasting knowledge when evaluating wine. Experienced wine consumers, on the other hand, do not seem to respond strongly to the pre-tasting knowledge of the extrinsic attributes in their evaluation of wine.

Originality/value

The studies of taste preference and role of extrinsic characteristics in wine evaluation and consumption in the rapidly growing Asian market is increasingly important for the wine industry. The evidence from this study suggests the importance for producers and marketers to consider consumer heterogeneity and product differentiation when pricing and distributing their wine.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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