Search results

1 – 10 of over 10000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Tara St. John

This article outlines the findings and general implications of Mental Health Foundation research into the needs of older Asians with dementia and their carers. The project…

Abstract

This article outlines the findings and general implications of Mental Health Foundation research into the needs of older Asians with dementia and their carers. The project was carried out in an area with an Asian majority population in North West Kent. The focus is on the identification of need and on factors which block access to care and support. There are recommendations for practitioners and commissioners about raising awareness, service development and training.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Chih Sin

The importance of ties between older people and their children has been widely documented as a fundamental component in the provision and receipt of support. While the…

Abstract

The importance of ties between older people and their children has been widely documented as a fundamental component in the provision and receipt of support. While the reference to such support is usually made in a benign manner, it is overly simplistic to assume that support provided by family members will always and necessarily lead to positive outcomes for older people. A person's perception of the adequacy or quality of support is inevitably influenced by his or her expectation of the type, frequency and source of support preferred or required. Most existing British research on the family support of older people has concentrated on those from the white‐British majority with little cross‐group comparisons. This article reports on in‐depth qualitative research with 17 and 21 older people from white‐British and Asian‐Indian backgrounds respectively. It demonstrates how gender, ethnicity, migration history and a range of other factors interweave in complex manners to affect individuals' expectations for support from their adult children. The findings reveal commonalities and differences within and between groups and demonstrate that the association between expectations of support and resultant sense of well‐being is complicated and is often conditional. Stereotypes within and across groups need to be examined given the observation that while familial norms may be played out differently in different cultural contexts, individuals make sense of and rationalise their expectations for support to take into account the dynamics of changing structures and attitudes.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Jessica Valles

Drawing from theories of modernization and socioemotional selectivity, this study investigates the effect of familial support on the relationship between immigrant…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from theories of modernization and socioemotional selectivity, this study investigates the effect of familial support on the relationship between immigrant generation and mental health service use for Asian American and Latinx older adults.

Methodology/Approach

Using the data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) 2002–2003, nested logistic regressions (N = 810) were used to test the effects of familial support (parent–child relationship quality) on the relationship between immigrant generation and the use of mental health services. Differences in familial support between older adults and their younger counterparts were also accounted for.

Findings

The results indicate that familial support partially attenuates the relationship between immigrant generation and mental health service use, but only for Latinx groups. Familial support was not significantly different for older adults than that of those younger in age.

Research Limitations/Implications

Findings suggest the need for a better understanding of familial support as it relates to mental health service use for these groups. Approaches to improving the access to, and the overall use of, mental health services should be sensitive to ethnic variation. Immigrant groups may also endure stressors associated with legal and citizenship status. Future research should consider the effect of these political identities on mental health. Studies on parent–child relationship quality should also be longitudinal in order to better understand the dynamic nature of familial support across the life course.

Originality/Value of Paper

This chapter addresses gaps in the literature as Asian Americans are relatively understudied group with regard to mental health. Previous studies showed that US-born Asian American and Latinx populations are more likely to use mental health services than their foreign-born counterparts, but the effects of generation status and familial support for older adults are unclear.

Details

Underserved and Socially Disadvantaged Groups and Linkages with Health and Health Care Differentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-055-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Ashfaque Ahmed Talpur, Tony Ryan, Parveen Ali and Sharron Hinchliff

The purpose of this paper is to perform a review of the literature of empirical studies on elder mistreatment (EM) in South Asians, and to discuss key implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to perform a review of the literature of empirical studies on elder mistreatment (EM) in South Asians, and to discuss key implications for policy, practice and research.

Design/methodology/approach

For this review, multiple electronic databases in the international health and social science were searched and supplemented by grey literature and cross-references. Quality of papers was assessed by two authors against the standard checklists.

Findings

In total, 16 studies met the inclusion criteria of this review, of which 11 were cross-sectional design, and only six of them used standard instruments to measure EM. The prevalence estimates of overall EM retrieved from general population-based studies ranged from 9.3 per cent in India to 49.1 per cent in Nepal. Age, gender, residential settings, socioeconomic status, health, education, and social structures and processes were key risk factors for EM in South Asian communities. Reporting and action taking were culturally rooted.

Originality/value

While the review is not systematic, there are limitations associated with the paper in covering the diverse range of databases and studies. However, this review provides a valuable synthesis of the empirical papers on the incidence, culturally specific risk factors and reporting trends of EM in South Asians. Additionally, the review presents the papers evaluated for a quality to ensure the validity of empirical data. Finally, the review includes several implications for policy, practice and future research on EM which may ultimately contribute in improving the health and wellbeing of elder South Asians.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Manna Santokhee

Changes in Asian communities leave some elderly people in need of support from outside the family. The article describes Aashna House, a home for frail older Asians which…

Abstract

Changes in Asian communities leave some elderly people in need of support from outside the family. The article describes Aashna House, a home for frail older Asians which has succeeded in making community living for elders both acceptable and attractive.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Ajit Shah

The black and ethnic minority (BME) elderly population in England and Wales is increasing. As dementia is an age‐related disorder and the prevalence of depression in old…

Abstract

The black and ethnic minority (BME) elderly population in England and Wales is increasing. As dementia is an age‐related disorder and the prevalence of depression in old age is high, the absolute number of cases of dementia and depression will increase among BME elders. This has implications for the development and delivery of old age psychiatry services (OAPSs) for BME elders. Demographic data pertaining to the elderly from BME groups in the 2001 population census were analysed in detail to evaluate the implications for development and delivery of OAPSs for BME elders. The demographic changes identified have important future implications for the development and delivery of OAPSs for BME elders. Unless they are addressed systematically, BME elders will continue to harbour untreated, hidden psychiatric morbidity. Strategies to ensure that this vulnerable group of elderly are identified and provided with accessible, acceptable and culturally sensitive OAPSs should be developed.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Karan Jutlla and Neil Moreland

While personalisation and service choice remains a central plank of the Labour Government's policies in health and social care, there is a growing evidence base confirming…

Abstract

While personalisation and service choice remains a central plank of the Labour Government's policies in health and social care, there is a growing evidence base confirming that ethnic minority groups, are disadvantaged as service users in the UK. Building on some baseline data collected in 2000 and 2003/04, our recent research (Jutlla & Moreland, 2007) has reaffirmed the difficulties that Asian carers have in accessing services when caring for a relative with dementia.While such access data is important, we wish to move beyond the demographic aspects to consider the existential realities (the ontology) of the lives and cultures of those in minority ethnic groups. This paper consequently discusses the diversity and complexity of migration patterns among the Sikh community living in Wolverhampton. The paper conceptualises some of the ways in which different migration experiences and the realities of daily life influence the perceptions, experiences and patterns of care among migrant Sikh carers in Wolverhampton caring for an older person with dementia. The paper thus explores the thesis that the Sikh community is not a homogeneous group; and that the diversity and differences within the Sikh community can have important implications for care. Taking a biographical narrative approach to fieldwork, the relevant factors to be considered include: the carer's country of origin; their migration route and reasons for migration; their age at migration and the cultural experiences of the carers and their communities both in the UK and India.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

David Jolley, Neil Moreland, Kate Read, Harjinder Kaur, Karan Jutlla and Michael Clark

Dementia is found in all races. Within the UK, elders in black and minority ethnic (BME) communities are often unable or unwilling to access services that might help them…

Abstract

Dementia is found in all races. Within the UK, elders in black and minority ethnic (BME) communities are often unable or unwilling to access services that might help them when they develop dementia. A series of research‐based studies in Wolverhampton have demonstrated that working with community leaders and family carers can identify strengths as well as areas for development in service arrangements. Some areas for development are those shared by all individuals and families with dementia, while others are specific to the cultural group. Areas for action include: the lack of understanding of the normal and pathological features of ageing; fear and stigma associated with mental disorders within BME communities; lack of knowledge of dementia; and insensitivity and inflexibility within some components of services. Knowledge gained from a collaborative review of the situation can be used to plan and deliver iterative improvements. The most effective single initiative is the appointment of a link nurse competent in language, culture and clinical skills. Despite progress over a 10 year period, difficulties remain and there is more to be learned.The research reported here has been conducted over a period of nine years within the city of Wolverhampton. The research has been co‐ordinated from for dementia plus (previously Dementia Plus), which has functioned as the Dementia Development Centre for the West Midlands since 2000.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

1 – 10 of over 10000