Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Juan Wang

Many Chinese libraries have limited budget to buy foreign language books. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an available and cheaper suggestion for the budgets of…

223

Abstract

Purpose

Many Chinese libraries have limited budget to buy foreign language books. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an available and cheaper suggestion for the budgets of small libraries' foreign language books acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the benefits of selecting donated books and takes some small libraries in China as examples to conduct the case study.

Findings

Advantages of selecting donated books include: quick arrival, lower cost, and a variety of title selections. Disadvantages are: no book list, long distance, unsatisfied selection.

Practical implications

Donated books in one's purchasing program can substantially expand the range and amount of materials that libraries are able to collect.

Originality/value

This paper will be useful to any library facing budget cuts as well as looking for ways to continually provide a wide variety of library materials.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Aubrey Harvey Chaputula

The aim of this research was to study collection development practices in some selected private university libraries in Malawi with special focus on University of…

1154

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research was to study collection development practices in some selected private university libraries in Malawi with special focus on University of Livingstonia and Adventist University Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a case study approach that made use of both quantitative and qualitative methods. Data were collected using interview guides and coding schedules. Interviews were conducted with university librarians of the two institutions. Self-administered questionnaires were administered to the Finance Officers and University Librarians of the institutions covered by the study to collect financial statistics and data relating to collection development. Qualitative data were analysed thematically while quantitative data were analysed using Ms Excel.

Findings

Findings of the study indicated that private university libraries in this study are funded mainly by parent institutions. Funding is not adequate as is the case with public university libraries in the country. This had adversely affected collection development practices that include purchase of materials and staff training. The two institutions, however, differed in terms of the other collection development activities they undertook, and magnitude of the challenges they faced, something that was attributed to slight difference in terms of funding they got from parent institutions.

Practical implications

The study sheds light on the collection development practices of University of Livingstonia Library and Adventist University Library, and challenges facing them. Some of these findings mirror those of other libraries not only in this sector, but also public university libraries in the country. Suggestions on how the collection development challenges facing the two libraries could be tackled have been made. It is hoped that the suggestions made could benefit other libraries who find themselves in a similar situation, if implemented. The study findings could also inform future researchers venturing in the same field.

Originality/value

Very little is known about the collection development practices of private university libraries not only in Malawi but the world at large owing to lack of significant research undertaken on the topic. This study is, therefore, significant because its findings fill up the existing knowledge gap. If acted on, recommendations made could also help solve some of the challenges that are being faced.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Hee Yeon Kim and Jae‐Eun Chung

Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine the effects of consumer values and past experiences on consumer purchase intention of organic personal care products…

48507

Abstract

Purpose

Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine the effects of consumer values and past experiences on consumer purchase intention of organic personal care products, this study aims to consider further the moderating effect of perceived behavioral control on the attitude‐intention relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with 207 online panel members, and multiple regression analysis was used to test the relationships among the variables.

Findings

The results indicate that environmental consciousness and appearance consciousness positively influence attitude toward buying organic personal care products. The addition of past experiences as a predictor of purchase intention and perceived behavioral control as a moderator of the attitude‐purchase intention relationship yielded an improvement on the TPB model.

Practical implications

This study suggests that retailers can develop effective marketing strategies emphasizing ecological beauty, product safety, and affordable prices to increase consumers' intentions to buy organic personal care products.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable insight into US consumer behavior regarding organic personal care products by examining the factors that influence consumers' attitudes toward buying organic personal care products and consumers' purchase intentions for the products. Furthermore, this study extends an application of the TPB by examining the moderating influence of perceived behavioral control on the attitude‐intention relationship.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Renée Hui Ling Tan

– The paper aims to explore the possibility of advancing a Singaporean way of learning within the continuing education and training landscape in Singapore.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the possibility of advancing a Singaporean way of learning within the continuing education and training landscape in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the vehicle of a narrative interview and extending the boundaries of autoethnography, the paper uses personal reflection and interpretation to explore the issues of Singaporean identity amidst the diversity in the globalised Singapore of today.

Findings

The paper uncovers the growing latent discomfort of Singaporeans as they navigate historical legacies of Colonialism and question what it means to be schooled in Western systems whilst being Asian. With the supplanting of Asian languages and the seeming superiority and dominance of Western talent, systems and knowledge, Singaporeans are looking to express a greater sense of what being Singaporean could mean.

Social implications

Upon manoeuvring and exposing the invisible, the paper concludes that there is an impetus to forge a “Singaporean way”, although how this would manifest itself is, as yet, unknown.

Originality/value

Although Singapore has a very visible presence globally for its economic achievements, the paper allows for an often under-represented voice of a native Singaporean to be heard. The liberties taken here with the narrative inquiry mode also allow space for a deeper exploration of identity, pride and conflict in a Singaporean today.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Carliss D. Miller, Orlando C. Richard and David L. Ford, Jr

In management research, little is known about how ethno-racial minority leaders interact with similar employees in supervisor–subordinate relationships. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In management research, little is known about how ethno-racial minority leaders interact with similar employees in supervisor–subordinate relationships. This study aims to examine and provide a deeper understanding of individuals’ negative reactions to similar others, thus highlighting the double-edged nature of demographic similarity which has historically predicted positive affective reactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey design, the authors collected data from supervisor-subordinate dyads from multiple companies from the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex in Texas, USA. They used ordinary least squares regression and conditional process analysis to test the hypotheses, including a two-stage moderation and moderated mediation.

Findings

Incorporating social context, i.e. minority status, as a moderator, the results show that ethno-racial minority leaders supervising ethno-racially similar subordinates were more vulnerable to relationship conflict than non-minority dyads. This, in turn, is linked to a reduction in the leaders’ feelings of trust toward their ethno-racially similar subordinate.

Originality/value

This study draws on social identity theory and status characteristics theory to explain the contradictory processes and outcomes associated with dyadic ethno-racial similarity and suggests the conditions under which dyad racial similarity is connected with unfavorable outcomes. This framework helps to broaden the boundary conditions of relational demography to provide a more nuanced explanation of when and why minority leaders in demographically similar hierarchical dyads experience more relationship conflict, which ultimately diminishes trust.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5