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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

D. Kirk Davidson, Kanji Tanimoto, Laura Gyung Jun, Shallini Taneja, Pawan K. Taneja and Juelin Yin

The origins of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been widely attributed to the work of scholars, and business managers as well, in North America and Western…

Abstract

The origins of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been widely attributed to the work of scholars, and business managers as well, in North America and Western Europe. Inevitably, however, as the economic interaction of individual firms and entire nations has grown over the past several decades — call it globalization — so too has the concept and the practice of CSR spread throughout the world. It is certainly time to explore how CSR is being incorporated into the practice of business management in other regions and other countries. Therefore, in this chapter we will focus on Asia: specifically on Japan, South Korea, India, and China. It is interesting for academicians to understand how CSR is being absorbed and adapted into the business cultures of these four countries. Perhaps of even greater importance, it is vital that business managers know what to expect about the interaction between business and society as well as the government as their commercial activities grow in this burgeoning part of the world.

For each of these four countries, we will provide an overview of the extent to which CSR has become a part of the academic community and also how it is being practiced and incorporated in everyday management affairs. We will see that there are very significant differences among these countries which lead to the natural question: why? To answer this question, we will use an eight-part analytical framework developed specifically for this purpose. We will look at the history, the dominant religious beliefs, the relevant social customs, the geography, the political structures, the level of economic development, civil society institutions, and the “safety net” of each country. As a result of this analysis, we believe, academicians can learn how CSR is absorbed and spread into commercial affairs, and managers can profit from learning more about what to expect when doing business in this increasingly important region.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Fei‐Wen Ho and Kirk Hallahan

This study examines gestures, themes, message copy points and imagery, and strategy motives reflected in corporate advertising appearing in the China Times and United…

Abstract

This study examines gestures, themes, message copy points and imagery, and strategy motives reflected in corporate advertising appearing in the China Times and United Daily News, two leading newspapers, in the month following the devastating Chin‐Chin earthquake in Taiwan in September 1999. The study identified four possible corporate strategy motives in post‐crisis corporate communications: social responsibility, communal relationship building, enlightened self‐interest and impression management. A content analysis of adverts (n=100) suggested communal relationship building drove corporate advertising endeavours. Corporate philanthropy was the most common gesture described in the adverts, and the most frequent themes and message components focused on the restoration of society. No significant differences were found between companies headquartered in Taiwan versus elsewhere, or between companies headquartered in Asia versus the West. Implications for examining crisis communications and underlying motives behind public relations communications are discussed.

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Roger Chen and Zhan Li

A Conversation with Dominic Barton, Chairman of McKinsey & Company Asia‐Pacific Region. Barton offers advice for MNCs on doing business in Asia, and discusses the

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A Conversation with Dominic Barton, Chairman of McKinsey & Company Asia‐Pacific Region. Barton offers advice for MNCs on doing business in Asia, and discusses the challenges of entering the Asian market. Conversely, he also talks about Asian companies becoming global players.

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Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Low Sui Pheng and Christopher H.Y. Leong

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many…

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8533

Abstract

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many countries in Asia, including Singapore. One of the arguments put forward to explain the financial crisis in Asia relates to the Asian style of management, which purportedly includes kinsmanship and guanxi or family connections. But is this really the case? Is the Asian management style significantly different from the Western style of management? It is shown that the style of management in Asian countries can also be explained and described using contemporary management theories from the West. This is achieved through a case study in construction project management for a typical family‐run building firm in Singapore. Field observations on the construction site suggest that the style of management in Asia can be related to modern management theories from the West.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2005

Jill Nemiro, Stefanus Hanifah and Jing Wang

Contemporary organizations have realized the importance of creating work environments that energize and sustain collaborative capacity. Nowhere is the need for…

Abstract

Contemporary organizations have realized the importance of creating work environments that energize and sustain collaborative capacity. Nowhere is the need for collaborative capacity more apparent than when business interactions and collaborative work efforts cross country boundaries. Collaborative capacity is the foundation to an organization's key resource, the collaborative capital. Creating a work environment or climate that supports, enhances, and maintains collaborative capacity is essential for achieving high levels of collaborative capital. In this chapter, we review an exploratory, cross-cultural investigation of the work environments that guide organizations (public and private universities) in the United States and in several Asian countries. One hundred and ninety-four staff from a university in the United States and a combined total of 976 individuals from eight universities throughout Asia (Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan) were asked to assess their organizations’ work environments using the Performance Environmental Perception Scale (PEPS; David Ripley (1998) The development of the performance environment perception scale and its underlying theoretical model. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville). We describe what work environment factors were viewed the same across Eastern and Western cultures, and what factors were viewed differently. Additionally, we present a model of work environment factors that can be used to enhance and sustain collaborative capacity across Eastern and Western cultures.

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Collaborative Capital: Creating Intangible Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-222-1

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

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Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Low Sui Pheng and Christopher H.Y. Leong

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai Baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many…

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4084

Abstract

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai Baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many countries in Asia, including Singapore. One of the arguments that has been put forward to explain the financial crisis in Asia relates to the Asian style of management, which purportedly includes kinsmanship and guanxi or family connections. This paper seeks to discover whether the Asian management style is significantly different from the western style of management. This is achieved through a case study in construction project management for a typical family‐run building firm in Singapore. Field observations on the construction site suggest that the style of management in Asia can be related to modern management theories from the West.

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Work Study, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Wolfgang Stehle and Ronel Erwee

Researchers still debate the relevance of using cultural frameworks and socio‐economic differences between countries versus focussing on institutional differences when…

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1623

Abstract

Researchers still debate the relevance of using cultural frameworks and socio‐economic differences between countries versus focussing on institutional differences when analysing issues affecting the transfer of Human Resource policies between countries. This paper first compares four countries from Europe and Asia on a macroeconomic level as well as on cultural dimensions. It then investigates perceived cultural differences between managers on the transfer of human resource policies by contrasting the perceptions of German headquarters managers with those of their subsidiary managers in Singapore, Thailand and Indonesia. This exploratory study uses qualitative methodology to analyse twenty four in‐depth interviews with Human Resource directors and line managers in German electrical, mechanical and chemical companies. The study confirms the importance of perceived cultural differences between managers at headquarters and in the subsidiaries and highlights the presence of misperceptions based on overgeneralisations emanating from the German headquarters as well as local subsidiaries. Convergence is confirmed on a HR policy level with crossvergence taking place on a process level via regional platforms. The growing role of the subsidiary HR director as a cultural translator and regional team player is found to be a key element in the transfer process.

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Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Peter L. Daniels

The paper aims to identify the form and significance of the influence of Buddhism upon the nature of past and future national economic change. It is divided to address two…

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3007

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The paper aims to identify the form and significance of the influence of Buddhism upon the nature of past and future national economic change. It is divided to address two major tasks. The first section analyses the world view and behavioural prescriptions of Buddhism and examines their compatibility with the requirements commonly presumed for economic development. This analysis suggests that, contrary to conventional views, Buddhism has many positive features consistent with processes and change leading to growth in economic welfare (especially under the modern ecologically sustainable development framework). The second section consists of an empirical analysis of comparative social, economic and environmental indicators across nations where Buddhism is likely to have had a substantial influence. Although few regularities are identified across the entire group of nations, some internal similarities are noted together with discussion of the importance of historical factors and development potentiality linked to the influence of Buddhism. The analysis provides a useful overview of relative conditions and trends in Buddhist‐influenced nations on a diverse range of social, economic and environmental indicators.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 25 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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