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Article

Innocent Akhuemonkhan, Lukman Raimi, Ashok M Patel and Adeniyi O. Fadipe

Entrepreneurship development in Nigeria requires the adoption and assimilation of enterprise development models from nations with replicable success stories. Technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship development in Nigeria requires the adoption and assimilation of enterprise development models from nations with replicable success stories. Technology incubation centre (TIC) is one of the potent mechanisms that launched the “BRIC nations” – Brazil, Russia, India and China – to global prominence as the five biggest emerging economies. This paper attempts to unveil the potentials of TICs as novel tools for entrepreneurship development and actualisation of the Vision 20:2020 in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt analytical and discursive approaches using qualitative and quantitative data sourced from Industrial policy documents, Goldman Sachs report, online databases of government agencies, Vision 20:2020 policy document and published articles on the subject matter. The generated data were subjected to content and thematic analyses, on the basis of which relevant conclusions were drawn.

Findings

The findings from the research indicate that there are 37 TICs in Nigeria with very weak socio-economic impact on job creation, wealth creation and industrial development in Nigeria. However, for the BRIC nations, adopted as comparative models, TICs have impacted positively on job creation, wealth creation and economic development of the five nations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is essentially discursive and subjective. Further research on this subject matter should explore empirical analysis for an objective assessment of the situation.

Practical implications

This paper underscores the need for harmonisation of policy objectives with policy implementation. At present, there are gaps between TIC policy objectives and woeful performance of the 37 TICs in Nigeria.

Social implications

For Nigeria, to enhance job creation, wealth creation and economic development in the society, there is the need for functional TICs at local, institutional, regional, state and national levels.

Originality/value

The paper unveils the gap between economic theory and practical model implementation in developing economy (Nigeria). It is a major contribution to the functionalist and structuralist debates on why policies fail.

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Article

Javed G. Hussain, Jonathan M. Scott and Harry Matlay

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact that entrepreneurship education can have on succession in ethnic minority family firms that operate in the highly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact that entrepreneurship education can have on succession in ethnic minority family firms that operate in the highly competitive UK economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a complex conceptual model of ethnic minority graduates' economic activities and outlines the possible influence that entrepreneurship education can have on succession in their family firms. An illustrative case study is presented of an ethnic minority graduate who returned to work in the family firm.

Findings

It emerges that entrepreneurship education provision in UK HEIs is insufficiently customised to, and focused on, the specific entrepreneurial needs of graduates. Educators should take into account the complex socio‐economic and cultural differences between native and ethnic minority learning environments. Effective entrepreneurship education emerges as crucial to the survival and growth of ethnic minority family businesses in the UK and could contribute positively to ownership transfer in this type of firm.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed theoretical model has not been empirically tested and it is only indicative of the impact that entrepreneurship education could have on succession in small ethnic minority family businesses in the UK.

Originality/value

Although prior research has explored various aspects of ownership succession, this article focuses specifically on the impact that entrepreneurship education can have on succession in small ethnic minority family firms.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

B.V. Kumar

In spite of built‐in checks and due diligence procedures adopted and implemented by governmental agencies, financial institutions and insurance companies, nothing can…

Abstract

In spite of built‐in checks and due diligence procedures adopted and implemented by governmental agencies, financial institutions and insurance companies, nothing can prevent human ingenuity from breaching those barriers in order to commit financial fraud. A recent case detected by the Directorate General of Revenue Intelligence (DRI), India, having international ramifications, is a pointer to many such frauds that might have been committed and have gone undetected for many years.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

Kinshuk, Ashok Patel and David Russell

Researchers frequently come across teachers who distrust a learning environment as embodying the beliefs of the designers and not their own pedagogy. Following the lead…

Abstract

Researchers frequently come across teachers who distrust a learning environment as embodying the beliefs of the designers and not their own pedagogy. Following the lead provided by user modelling work carried out in the field of human‐computer interaction, there has been much research on student modelling and adaptivity to individual learners; however, the role of the teacher as the manager of the learning process and hence a much more significant user of a learning environment has been ignored. This paper discusses the need for a human teacher model in any computer‐based learning environment and recommends configurable, incremental and re‐structurable contributive learning environments (CIRCLE) architecture to ensure wider acceptance and greater reuse of the phenomenal creative effort that goes into designing a good learning environment.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article

Ashok Ashta, Peter John Stokes, Simon M. Smith and Paul Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to develop understanding of cross-cultural issues relating to the experience and implications of an elite grouping of Japanese CEOs customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop understanding of cross-cultural issues relating to the experience and implications of an elite grouping of Japanese CEOs customer value orientations (CVOs) within Japanese firms operating in India. The paper underlines that there is a propensity for East-West comparisons and in contrast the argument contributes to the under-examined area of research on East Asian/South Asian comparative studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were employed to generate narratives that provided rich and novel insights into the lived experience of Japanese CEOs working in Indian contexts and in relation to CVO. An inductive framework was employed in order to develop a more in-depth understanding of Japanese CEO CVO in Indo-Japanese empirical settings.

Findings

The data analysis identified a number of shared themes that influence CVO practice in the Indo-Japanese context. The findings develop an awareness of cross-cultural management's (CCM) in relation to the under-explored area of the Indo-Japanese dyad.

Research limitations/implications

The paper develops CCM perspectives towards a more in-depth conceptualization of Japanese CEO perceptions on CVO practice in India. This is also of potential relevance to wider foreign investors not only Japanese businesses. The sample respondents – Japanese CEOS working in India – constitute a small and elite group. The lead author, having experience as a CEO of a Japanese firm was able to use convenience sampling to access this difficult to access group. In addition, also stemming from the convenience aspect, all the respondents were in the manufacturing sector. The study was deliberately targeted and narrowly focussed for this reason and does not claim automatic wide generalizability to other employee strata or industry; however, other sectors and employees may recognize resonance. This identified gap provides space for future studies in varying regional, national and sector contexts.

Practical implications

The paper identifies implications for CCM training and Indo-Japanese business organization design.

Social implications

Use and acceptance of the enhanced research paradigm could support diversity in research and knowledge production with implications for research, teaching and future policymakers.

Originality/value

The cross-cultural study is original in that it contributes to CCM literature by providing a rare Indo-Japanese (sic East Asian: South Asian) comparative study. It provides an uncommon granular appreciation of the interaction of these cultures in relation to CVO. In addition, it secures rare data from an elite Japanese CEOs of manufacturing sector businesses.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Ruchi Mishra, Ashok K. Pundir and L. Ganapathy

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel integrated approach using analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel integrated approach using analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) methods for evaluation and prioritization of appropriate manufacturing flexibility type required in the face of multiple environmental uncertainties.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study of an Indian fashion apparel firm, the study demonstrates the application of the proposed integrated framework for evaluation and prioritization of manufacturing flexibility. The study uses AHP method to determine importance weight of environmental uncertainty criteria and subcriteria and then employs TOPSIS method to determine the final ranking of manufacturing flexibility types required to cope up with these uncertainties.

Findings

The findings of the case suggest that the proposed integrated approach is feasible and practically implementable for manufacturing flexibility assessment.

Research limitations/implications

AHP has been extensively studied and used, but the major limitation of this proposed approach is the involvement of large number of pairwise comparisons leading to difficulty in maintaining consistency in pairwise comparisons.

Practical implications

The proposed approach can work as a benchmarking tool to practitioners in evaluating and prioritizing manufacturing flexibility alternatives and to suggest strategic allocation of resource by prioritizing different manufacturing flexibilities types.

Originality/value

Unlike conventional approaches, the study provides meaningful knowledge to decision makers by demonstrating a simple, flexible, and efficient method to evaluate and rank the appropriate manufacturing flexibility types.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Ashok Ashta

The importance of work design to organizational engagement and firm performance is increasingly recognized in management scholarship. For international business, a…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of work design to organizational engagement and firm performance is increasingly recognized in management scholarship. For international business, a majority of variation in work design based on national cultures is addressed through cross-cultural management scholarship. However, there is a paucity of qualitative research on the influences international business human resource managers face for work design in the intercultural environment of overseas subsidiaries. The purpose of this interpretivist study was to examine the lived experience of overseas subsidiaries’ local managers to surface a more nuanced understanding of their expectations and related implications for work.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research was conducted through semistructured in-depth interviews with senior managers of subsidiaries of Japanese MNCs in USA, Thailand and India.

Findings

The findings of the study develop and extend on prior cross-cultural management scholarship on world cultural clusters revealing changed expectations of work in intercultural work environments as instantiated by Japanese MNCs.

Social implications

Through engaging work design, international businesses can contribute to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 8 that pertains to decent work.

Originality/value

The study adds to extant understanding of the work design antecedent to engagement by broadening to intercultural environment impacts understanding facilitated by empirical lived experience data and suggesting a modification to extant theory. This study pioneers in taking world cultural clusters as the field for evaluating data.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Application of Big Data and Business Analytics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-884-2

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Article

Shradha Ashok Gawankar, Sachin Kamble and Rakesh Raut

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between two major constructs (supply chain management practices (SCMP) and supply chain performance measures)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between two major constructs (supply chain management practices (SCMP) and supply chain performance measures), which determines the efficiency and efficacy of retail-supply chain management, using a rigorous empirical method to validate the instrument scale for measuring the validity and reliability of the identified constructs. Additionally, the paper further tests the relationship between SCMP and supply chain performance measures using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were compiled and collected from 213 operations and supply chain (SC) heads from leading retail stores in India. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the validity of the proposed measurement scale and the relationship is tested using SEM.

Findings

The results of the research will help the decision makers in the SC/procurement field to understand the importance of the association between SCMP and supply chain performance measures. Statistical tests show that the implementation of SCMP are associated with supply chain performance measures, which leads to overall improvements; moreover, there is a statistically significant association between the five SCMP and eight SCPM.

Research limitations/implications

This research is also needed to provide more understanding about the SCMP along with the supply chain performance measures and the positive association among them. Overall, this research provides an additional insight into the growing field of the relationships between SCMP and SCPM. Clearly, the field has ample space to grow in terms of research and practice.

Originality/value

This research paper contributes to the literature on supply chain performance measurement.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

V. Raja Sreedharan and R. Raju

The purpose of this paper is to review Lean Six Sigma (LSS) literature and report different definitions, demographics, methodologies and industries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review Lean Six Sigma (LSS) literature and report different definitions, demographics, methodologies and industries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper highlights various definitions by different researchers and practitioners. A total of 235 research papers has been reviewed for the LSS theme, research methodology adopted, type of industry, author profile, country of research and year of publication.

Findings

From the review, four significant LSS classifications were identified that deal with the spread of LSS in different industries followed by observation for classification.

Practical implications

LSS is a strategy for success, but it did not examine its presence in various Industries. From this paper, readers can understand the quantum of its spread before implementing LSS. For academicians, it will be a comprehensive list of papers for research.

Originality/value

This paper reviews 235 research papers for their year, author profile, research methodology and type of industry. Various characteristics of LSS definitions and their theme are also reviewed.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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