Search results

1 – 10 of 12
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ashok Kochhar and Ashok Suri

Develops and describes a knowledge‐based systems approach which maybe used to highlight the disparity between the essential and/ordesirable prerequisites for the…

Abstract

Develops and describes a knowledge‐based systems approach which may be used to highlight the disparity between the essential and/or desirable prerequisites for the implementation of effective master production scheduling (MPS) systems and what actually exists in a given manufacturing environment. Identifies seven high level MPS implementation issues: level of understanding of MPS systems; procedures and responsibilities for MPS creation; planning horizons, time‐buckets and time fences; capacity feasibility of the MPS; dealing with backlogs; adherence to the MPS; and what to master schedule. Asks questions to determine the presence or absence of necessary prerequisites. If a high level prerequisite, relating to procedures and data, is not present, further lower level questions are asked to assess the reasons for its lack, and how it may be provided. This gap analysis approach makes it possible to identify in advance the major problems which must be addressed to ensure the effective implementation of master production scheduling systems.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Alexander Howard, Ashok Kochhar and John Dilworth

Outlines an objective model based approach for the functional specification of manufacturing planning and control (MPC) systems. It is based on the premise that there is…

Abstract

Outlines an objective model based approach for the functional specification of manufacturing planning and control (MPC) systems. It is based on the premise that there is factual information (company characteristics and management concerns) which can be used to make recommendations about suitable functionality of appropriate MPC systems. A generic MPC system architecture, applicable to medium‐sized batch manufacturing companies, is used to organise the information within the model. The model describes the relationships between the inputs (objective company characteristics and subjective management concerns) and outputs (MPC functional activities). The functional activities have been defined at a level of detail which represents significant choices in functionality and are useful for the functional specification of MPC systems. The model provides reasoning which describes the relevance of the activities in individual cases. Uses field studies to validate and test the elements of the model (inputs, outputs and reasoning). Uses the model output to create an outline functional specification at each of the field study sites. Concludes that the model can be used to obtain an objective view of necessary functionality in MPC systems in medium‐sized batch manufacturing companies. The output from the model can be used as the basis for the development of a final, detailed functional specification. Use of the model results in time savings.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ashok Kochhar and Brian McGarrie

Based on detailed analysis of seven case studies, involvingconsideration of approximately 300 parameters and face to faceinterviews with senior managers, identifies key…

Abstract

Based on detailed analysis of seven case studies, involving consideration of approximately 300 parameters and face to face interviews with senior managers, identifies key characteristics which should be taken into account during the selection and effective implementation of different types of manufacturing control systems in individual manufacturing environments. These key characteristics help identify the need for particular functions of manufacturing control systems, as well as the impact on effective implementation and operation. They are grouped under the headings of complexity, uncertainty and flexibility. Concludes with a discussion of a structured approach which may be used to take account of key characteristics during the selection of a manufacturing control system.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Alexander Howard, Ashok Kochhar and John Dilworth

This paper describes the use of a set of manufacturing planning and control (MPC) system activities for assessing the functionality suitable in individual companies. Field…

Abstract

This paper describes the use of a set of manufacturing planning and control (MPC) system activities for assessing the functionality suitable in individual companies. Field studies were carried out in medium‐sized batch manufacturing companies and the set of activities was used to investigate the functionality and level of computer support suitable in each case. The field studies verified the set of activities and the findings were used to refine the activities and identify additional activities to be included in the set. The field studies were also used to develop detailed reasons why each activity was considered relevant or not relevant. From the field studies it was possible to conclude that the overall type of company (i.e. make‐to‐order (MTO), make‐to‐stock (MTS), etc.) was not in itself sufficient to predict which activity would be relevant to a particular company. It is proposed that there are numerous reasons why an activity is relevant or not relevant and that it is the detailed characteristics of the individual company which are important in reaching this decision.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Alexander Howard, Ashok Kochhar and John Dilworth

The accurate specification of user’s real requirements from manufacturing planning and control (MPC) systems is carried out very poorly throughout the industry. This paper…

Abstract

The accurate specification of user’s real requirements from manufacturing planning and control (MPC) systems is carried out very poorly throughout the industry. This paper describes a rule‐based system for the specification of MPC system activities. The rule‐base provides detailed recommendations on the suitability of system activities to individual companies based on company characteristics and management concerns. It also provides supporting reasons for the recommendations. This paper describes the development of the rule‐base from the initial conceptual framework to the fully tested and validated PC‐based application. The rule‐base has been fully tested and validated in ten small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) engaged in batch manufacturing. This paper describes the experiences of two of these case studies by way of example.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Amanda J. Davies and Ashok K. Kochhar

The number of studies relating to best practice in manufacturing has been increasing at a rapid rate over the last few years. As companies strive to attain world‐class…

Abstract

The number of studies relating to best practice in manufacturing has been increasing at a rapid rate over the last few years. As companies strive to attain world‐class manufacturing status the search for best practice has intensified. Focus has evolved from benchmarking as a means to improve company performance through the identification of best practice, to the need to identify, manage and transfer best practices. This paper discusses this evolution of focus and identifies key issues for consideration in best practice investigations. In particular, it addresses issues of methodology which can improve the quality of findings from studies of best practice and maximise company performance through the transfer of appropriate best practices.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Amanda Jane Davies and Ashok Kumar Kochhar

Recent years have witnessed considerable interest in benchmarking as a technique for measuring performance against world class performers and identifying best practices…

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed considerable interest in benchmarking as a technique for measuring performance against world class performers and identifying best practices. However, a study carried out to ascertain the extent of use of benchmarking and best practice in manufacturing companies revealed that this interest has resulted in a limited use of benchmarking in overall terms and, in particular, has not led to benchmarking being undertaken at lower levels of manufacturing organisations. For example, the activities associated with manufacturing planning and control systems. This paper reports on the obstacles to benchmarking in companies and suggests the prerequisites necessary for carrying out an effective benchmarking study. It also discusses the importance of applying benchmarking activities to the lower levels of manufacturing organisations. The study was based on detailed field studies carried out in four batch manufacturing companies. It investigated 15 areas of manufacturing planning and control to establish the level of benchmarking and implementation of best practices within them.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

G.D.M. Frizelle

A methodology for implementing CAPM systems is described. Theresearch was motivated by evidence of dissatisfaction with theperformance of current systems, and the…

Abstract

A methodology for implementing CAPM systems is described. The research was motivated by evidence of dissatisfaction with the performance of current systems, and the existence of no generic methodology. A superposition process was employed. Areas of functional management were explored for sources of implementation methodologies and yielded a number of attributes for successful implementation. The emergent structure was then validated against field studies. The result, a methodology for improving control, is a three‐level hierarchy. The first level assesses the ability of the organisation to absorb change. The next considers the options for better control. The lowest level is concerned with implementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12