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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Jordan T. Bakhsh, Erik L. Lachance, Ashley Thompson and Milena M. Parent

The purpose of this study is to examine if sport event volunteers were inspired by their event experience to volunteer in the future.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine if sport event volunteers were inspired by their event experience to volunteer in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

A postevent questionnaire was administered to 161 professional golf tournament volunteers, in which 93 respondents were identified as first-time volunteers of the event and 68 as returning volunteers. A moderation analysis was conducted to assess if previous event-specific volunteer experience moderated the relationship between volunteers' inspiration and future volunteer intentions.

Findings

First-time event-specific volunteers were significantly more inspired to volunteer again than returning event-specific volunteers. Findings indicate volunteers can be inspired from their event experience toward future volunteer intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers conceptual understandings and new application of inspiration–behavioral intentions by examining sport events' (in)ability to inspire first-time and returning event volunteers to volunteer in the future. Findings are limited to the sport event volunteers' intention discussion.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates how event stakeholders can create positive future behavioral intentions for community members through hosting sport events. By positioning first-time event-specific volunteers within roles that can elicit inspiration (e.g. interacting with athletes), event managers can foster stronger future volunteer intentions.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of demonstration effects by moving beyond the traditional sport event spectators and sport participation intention foci. It demonstrates that sport events can inspire different spectator groups (i.e. event volunteers) toward different future behavioral intentions (i.e. volunteer intentions). Findings address previous sport event volunteer assumptions regarding intention, inspiration and volunteer segments.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Geoffrey P. Lantos and Lincoln G. Craton

The purpose of this paper is to provide a model of consumer response to music in broadcast commercials outlining four variables (listening situation, musical stimulus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a model of consumer response to music in broadcast commercials outlining four variables (listening situation, musical stimulus, listener characteristics, and advertising processing strategy) that affect a consumer's attitude toward the advertising music (Aam).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an integrative review of the relevant literatures from the psychology of music, marketing, and advertising.

Findings

Aam can be positively but also negatively influenced by many factors. Only some of these variables are employed in any typical study on consumer response to music, which may account for some conflicting findings.

Practical implications

The paper discusses factors for effectively using commercial music to affect Aam, with special focus on advertising processing strategy. Advertisers are urged to exercise extreme caution in using music and to always pretest its use considering factors identified in this paper. The paper suggests ways in which the model can guide future research.

Originality/value

The paper integrates diverse literatures and outlines the major variables comprising our model of consumer response to advertising music. Advertisers can use these variables as a checklist for factors to consider in selecting ad music.

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Inge R. Hill

The article's purpose is to demonstrate how UK artisan entrepreneurs organise entrepreneurial activities within the context of a creative industry organisation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The article's purpose is to demonstrate how UK artisan entrepreneurs organise entrepreneurial activities within the context of a creative industry organisation. The research asks how artisan entrepreneurs draw on contexts to manage entrepreneurial activities. The article investigates how these entrepreneurs organise collaborative business solutions through the lens of entrepreneurial capitals and their conversion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study employed a phenomenological approach to analyse the situated entrepreneurial activities of artisan entrepreneurs. Ethnographic methods assisted in capturing these activities.

Findings

The findings demonstrated the context-dependent collaborative business solutions by artisan entrepreneurs. Such solutions emerge from the interplay of the materiality of buildings, social relations management and personal resources. This materiality facilitates creative forms of social relations management for entrepreneurial activities between artisan entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The discussed entrepreneurial collaborative solutions are beneficial for many entrepreneurs in fragmented working conditions.

Originality/value

The detailed discussion of how artisan entrepreneurs organise entrepreneurial activities individually and collaboratively sheds light on dynamic microprocesses in context. The lens of entrepreneurial capitals and their conversion for these microprocesses integrates the literature on capital conversions with context as the main contribution to theory. This lens allows to home in on social relations and material environment management adding more fine-grained insights into how these micro-exchange processes work. These insights contribute to the literature on artisan entrepreneurship in the creative industries and entrepreneurship and context.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1951

T.C. SKEAT

The aim of this publication is to list the catalogues of the Department of Manuscripts which are in regular use. Catalogues which have been superseded by later…

Abstract

The aim of this publication is to list the catalogues of the Department of Manuscripts which are in regular use. Catalogues which have been superseded by later publications are not normally included, since whatever their historical or bibliographical interest they are no longer everyday working tools. To save space in cross‐reference, the catalogues, etc., here listed have been numbered serially in Clarendon type, thus: 31. This numeration has no other significance.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Gregory B. Fairchild and Joe Toomer

This case is designed to illustrate the methods private-equity investors use in assessing the value of market opportunities--in this instance, a plus-size clothing…

Abstract

This case is designed to illustrate the methods private-equity investors use in assessing the value of market opportunities--in this instance, a plus-size clothing retailer targeted to African-American and Hispanic women. The case addresses several issues, including niche marketing, urban development, and the challenge of evaluating market potential. The protagonist, a private-equity partner, must determine the market viability of an investment opportunity offered to his firm.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Ashley Ireland, Dana Statton Thompson and Brian Bourke

This study seeks to illuminate business instructors' undergraduate pedagogical processes toward developing resources and services to support their teaching.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to illuminate business instructors' undergraduate pedagogical processes toward developing resources and services to support their teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors recruited participants through purposeful sampling and collected data through semi-structured interviews. The transcriptions were coded using a grounded theory approach.

Findings

The findings of this study demonstrate that faculty are motivated to be good teachers and want to engage in opportunities to improve. However, lack of time and teaching with technology pose pedagogical learning curves for faculty. Institutional support for improving teaching is welcomed, but it may also be perceived as white noise against competing priorities and a deluge of information. Lastly, business, as a discipline, may uniquely use informational formats such as multimedia and case studies that may pose a challenge to traditional collection development.

Research limitations/implications

The project was designed to be exploratory, small-scale and grounded in approach. This study does not purport to be statistically representative nor are the recommendations meant to be prescriptive.

Practical implications

Academic libraries should be more intentional about positioning subject librarians to provide suggestions for textbooks or other course materials, collecting, organizing and preserving case studies and multimedia and their relationships with publishers that use models that subvert collecting textbooks. Libraries should also partner with technology and pedagogy support units to offer cooperative programming when possible.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the fields of library and information studies, business and education by articulating the unique needs of instructors within the larger contexts of business pedagogy, and the evolving relationship between libraries and undergraduate teaching support.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Ashleigh-Jane Thompson, Andrew J. Martin, Sarah Gee and Andrea N. Geurin

As the popularity of social media increases, sports brands must develop specific strategies to use them to enhance fan loyalty and build brand equity. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

As the popularity of social media increases, sports brands must develop specific strategies to use them to enhance fan loyalty and build brand equity. The purpose of this paper is to explore how two social media platforms were utilised by the Grand Slam tennis events to achieve branding and relationship marketing goals.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analytic design was employed to examine Twitter and Facebook posts from the official accounts during, and post-, each respective event.

Findings

Both sites were utilised to cultivate long-term relationships with fans and develop brand loyalty, rather than to undertake short-term marketing activations. However, these sites appear to serve a different purpose, and therefore unique strategies are required to leverage opportunities afforded by each. Interestingly, brand associations were utilised more frequently during the post-event time period.

Practical implications

This study offers practitioners with useful insight on branding and relationship-building strategies across two social platforms. These results suggest that strategies appear dependent on the event, timeframe and specific platform. Moreover, the events’ differences in post use and focus may also indicate some differences related to event branding in an international context. Furthermore, sport organisations should look to leverage creative strategies to overcome limitations that platform-specific functionality may impose.

Originality/value

This study offers unique insights brand-building efforts in an international event setting, which differ in a range of contextual factors that impact on social media utilisation.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Kristen Thomasen and Suzie Dunn

Perpetrators of Technology-Facilitated gender-based violence are taking advantage of increasingly automated and sophisticated privacy-invasive tools to carry out their…

Abstract

Perpetrators of Technology-Facilitated gender-based violence are taking advantage of increasingly automated and sophisticated privacy-invasive tools to carry out their abuse. Whether this be monitoring movements through stalkerware, using drones to nonconsensually film or harass, or manipulating and distributing intimate images online such as deepfakes and creepshots, invasions of privacy have become a significant form of gender-based violence. Accordingly, our normative and legal concepts of privacy must evolve to counter the harms arising from this misuse of new technology. Canada's Supreme Court recently addressed Technology-Facilitated violations of privacy in the context of voyeurism in R v Jarvis (2019) . The discussion of privacy in this decision appears to be a good first step toward a more equitable conceptualization of privacy protection. Building on existing privacy theories, this chapter examines what the reasoning in Jarvis might mean for “reasonable expectations of privacy” in other areas of law, and how this concept might be interpreted in response to gender-based Technology-Facilitated violence. The authors argue the courts in Canada and elsewhere must take the analysis in Jarvis further to fully realize a notion of privacy that protects the autonomy, dignity, and liberty of all.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Abstract

Details

The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

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