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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Santosh Hooda and Asha Kawatra

Baby corn (Zea mays) is young, finger‐like, unfertilized cobs of maize with one to three centimeters of emerged silk, preferably harvested within 24 hours of silk emergence…

555

Abstract

Purpose

Baby corn (Zea mays) is young, finger‐like, unfertilized cobs of maize with one to three centimeters of emerged silk, preferably harvested within 24 hours of silk emergence depending upon the growing season. It is a very perishable vegetable and hence the purpose of this present study is to standardize the freezing method for extending the shelf life of baby corn and to study the effect of frozen storage of 90 days on its nutritional composition.

Design/methodology/approach

Frozen baby corn was analysed for various nutritional parameters, namely proximate composition, minerals, in vitro starch and protein digestibility and vitamin, at regular intervals of 30 days for nine months.

Findings

Moisture, crude protein, crude fat and crude fibre content of baby corn showed no significant change during 90 days of frozen storage. A significant reduction was observed in calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron content of frozen baby corn. In vitro starch and protein digestibility showed a non‐significant change during frozen storage. Ascorbic acid and beta‐carotene content of frozen baby corn decreased significantly by 11.60 and 10.75 percent, respectively, by the end of 90 days of storage.

Originality/value

The present study indicates that freezing is an effective processing technology to enhance the storage life of baby corn.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Anju Sangwan, Asha Kawatra and Salil Sehgal

The purpose of this paper is to standardize the technique for the development of mint leaves powder. The effect of different drying methods on nutrient composition of mint leaves…

524

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to standardize the technique for the development of mint leaves powder. The effect of different drying methods on nutrient composition of mint leaves powder is studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The mint leaves powders were analyzed for the proximate composition, namely protein, crude fibre, fat, ash and moisture. Minerals, β‐carotene, ascorbic acid and polyphenol were estimated by employing standard techniques. Data thus obtained were subjected to analysis of complete randomized design and factorial complete randomized design. Sensory analysis was carried out using nine‐point hedonic scales by the panel of judges.

Findings

It was found that mint leaves powder prepared from the shade dried method had better nutritional and sensory profiles.

Originality/value

The paper shows that these developed powders could be easily stored and used in the off season at remunerative prices.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Santosh Hooda and Asha Kawatra

The purpose of this paper is to study nutritional composition of HM‐4 variety of baby corn.

897

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study nutritional composition of HM‐4 variety of baby corn.

Design/methodology/approach

Baby corn was analysed for proximate composition, available carbohydrates, dietary fiber constituents, in vitro digestibility, minerals, anti‐nutrients, vitamin and amino acids.

Findings

Baby corn contained 90.03, 17.96, 2.13, 5.30 and 5.89 percent moisture, protein, fat, ash and crude fibre, respectively. Total soluble sugars content was 23.43 g/100 gm and reducing sugars was 1.96 g/100 g. It contained 8.10 g/100 g of cellulose and 5.41 g/100 g of lignin. In vitro starch and protein digestibility was 28.80 mg maltose released per gram and 72.18 percent, respectively. Baby corn contained 5.43 mg/100 g of ascorbic acid and 670 μg/100 g of β‐carotene. Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus content of baby corn was 95.00, 345.00 and 898.62 mg/100 g, respectively, baby corn contained 0.05, 2.85 and 0.675μg/g of methionine, isoleucine and leucine, respectively.

Originality/value

The study indicated that baby corn is good source of various nutrients like protein, crude fibre, carbohydrates and dietary fibres and its nutritional quality is at par or even superior to many other commonly used vegetables.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Vijay Ganji

360

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2009

Antu Grewal and Sudesh Jood

Digestibility of pulses is affected due to presence of antinutritional and toxic compounds. Various processing treatments are known to destroy heat labile toxic compounds and…

636

Abstract

Purpose

Digestibility of pulses is affected due to presence of antinutritional and toxic compounds. Various processing treatments are known to destroy heat labile toxic compounds and other enzyme inhibitors, hence, to improve the texture, palatability and nutritive value of pulses. This paper, therefore, aims to focus on improving the digestibility and availability of nutrients of green gram (Vigna radiata L.) through processing treatments.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study was undertaken to see the effect of common processing and cooking treatments on newly released green gram cultivars. To achieve this objective, green gram seeds were soaked in plain water (1:4 w/v) for 12 hours at 37°C. One portion of the soaked seeds was dried at 55°C and left‐over soaked seeds were divided into three portions. One portion of the soaked seeds was dehulled manually. The second portion of the soaked seeds was ordinary and pressure‐cooked (water two times the weight of soaked seeds) for 35 minutes at 95‐100°C and at 1.05 kg/cm2 pressure for 15 minutes, respectively. The third portion of the soaked seeds was sprouted for 24 hours at 37°C. All the processed seeds were dried at 55°C in a hot air oven and then ground in a cyclone sample mill and stored for estimation of nutritional parameters using standard methods.

Findings

Soaking and cooking treatments had no significant effect on proximate composition, whereas sugar contents increased and starch contents decreased significantly. Soaking and cooking treatments also improved in vitro starch digestibility significantly. De‐hulling of soaked seeds further improved starch digestibility and also caused significant change in protein, fat, ash, crude fibre and sugar contents. Germination decreased starch, thereby raising the level of the soluble sugars and improved starch digestibility by 49 and 48 percent, respectively, in both cultivars. Similarly, pressure‐cooking also increased starch digestibility by about 44 and 49 percent, respectively, in both cultivars. Cooking may gelatinize starch and germination may mobilize starch, resulting in improved digestibility of starch by α‐amylase.

Practical implications

Evolving high‐yielding crop varieties is one of the most important strategies to fill the gap between demand and supply of food legumes and also to improve the nutritional status of the population consuming such foods. Hence, it is imperative to judge their chemical composition and improve them through inexpensive processing techniques.

Originality/value

The paper gives an overall view of nutritive values of new and traditional varieties of vegetables and will be of value to those who supply the consumer.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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