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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Asha Gupta

This paper seeks to conduct an in‐depth study of international trends in private higher education and focus on the Indian scenario

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to conduct an in‐depth study of international trends in private higher education and focus on the Indian scenario

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted is conceptual, analytical and comparative.

Findings

Though there has been better acceptability of private higher education institutions in India today than the “trepidation” felt at their emergence three decades ago, certain basic questions have been raised: Is the presence of private sector in higher education inevitable? Is it desirable too? Why is the Supreme Court of India intervening in matters pertaining to private higher education so frequently? What are the issues at stake?

Originality/value

An attempt is made to highlight the political‐economic, socio‐cultural, national‐international, ethical‐philosophical and legal‐practical aspects of this outreaching theme, in general, and focus on the driving forces, causes, and consequences of the emergence of the private higher education during the last three decades, in particular.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Surendra S. Yadav and Ravi Shankar

Abstract

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Judith Fletcher-Brown, Diane Carter, Vijay Pereira and Rajesh Chandwani

Knowledge is a key success factor in achieving competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to examine how mobile health technology facilitates knowledge management…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge is a key success factor in achieving competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to examine how mobile health technology facilitates knowledge management (KM) practices to enhance a public health service in an emerging economies context. Specifically, the acceptance of a knowledge-resource application by community health workers (CHWs) to deliver breast cancer health care in India, where resources are depleted, is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Fieldwork activity conducted 20 semi-structured interviews with frontline CHWs, which were analysed using an interpretive inductive approach.

Findings

The application generates knowledge as a resource that signals quality health care and yields a positive reputation for the public health service. The CHW’s acceptance of technology enables knowledge generation and knowledge capture. The design facilitates knowledge codification and knowledge transfer of breast cancer information to standardise quality patient care.

Practical implications

KM insights are provided for the implementation of mobile health technology for frontline health-care professionals in an emerging economies context. The knowledge-resource application can deliver breast cancer care, in localised areas with the potential for wider contexts. The outcomes are valuable for policymakers, health service managers and KM practitioners in an emerging economies context.

Social implications

The legacy of the mobile heath technology is the normalisation of breast cancer discourse and the technical up-skilling of CHWs.

Originality/value

First, this paper contributes three propositions to KM scholarship, in a public health care, emerging economies context. Second, via an interdisciplinary theoretical lens (signalling theory and technology acceptance model), this paper offers a novel conceptualisation to illustrate how a knowledge-resource application can shape an organisation’s KM to form a resource-based competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Asha Thomas and Vikas Gupta

The purpose of this study is to identify and explain the role of motivation in facilitating knowledge sharing (KS). This study explains the connection between “motivation”…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify and explain the role of motivation in facilitating knowledge sharing (KS). This study explains the connection between “motivation” and “knowledge sharing” or KS. Research finding offers significant theoretical and practical suggestions. Theoretically, the study provides clarity on various motivation theories and important constructs in KS.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reviews the literature on knowledge management in detail along with other published works. A search was conducted using online databases on the Web of Science (WoS) and Google Scholar. An analysis was done with the help of qualitative software NVivo 12 to critically analyze literature.

Findings

This theoretical review offers a retrospective view of theories, context, methods, antecedents or enablers to understand the motivation theories used in knowledge sharing research and provides a guideline for upcoming researches to contemplate and examine numerous motivation theories and also choose the most significant motivation theory and their construct in the researches on KS.

Originality/value

This theoretical review contributes toward knowledge sharing and motivation literature. There are no reviews on knowledge sharing relating to contemporary motivational theories to the best of our knowledge.

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Virendra Kumar, Anindya Jayanta Mishra and Sonia Verma

– The purpose of this paper is to provide systematic empirical evidence on the health planning through Village Health Sanitation and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs) in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide systematic empirical evidence on the health planning through Village Health Sanitation and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs) in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A micro-level study was carried out using qualitative study design. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 105 respondents selected from 42 VHSNC sites. A thematic analytical framework approach was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The research results indicate that VHSNCs are playing a significant role in health planning. However, the committee meetings are not organised by the committee members on the regular basis. Most of the VHSNC members do not make village health plans. There are some challenges associated with the functioning of VHSNCs like insufficient resources, lack of people’s interest, insignificant attention and the unfair behaviour of the Panchayati Raj leaders.

Practical implications

The implications of the findings suggest that VHSNCs play a significant role in health planning. However, the leadership is ineffective due to their partial capabilities and approach that generate non-conducive environment. Studies of such nature will be helpful for policy makers in understanding the current situation and micro-level picture of VHSNC and also in analysing it in the existing health system.

Originality/value

VHSNC functions with a broader concern and cover range of social determinants at the village level. This study provides empirical evidence on the VHSNCs as lowest part of the health system.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Preethi Krishnan and Mangala Subramaniam

The practices and arrangements within a family can create grounds for violence. Although we agree that family processes are important, we think that these explanations…

Abstract

Purpose

The practices and arrangements within a family can create grounds for violence. Although we agree that family processes are important, we think that these explanations downplay the structure of families (nuclear, extended) and thereby the ways in which gender relations are organized. In this paper, domestic violence is explored as an intra-family dynamic that extends beyond the intimate partner relationship and which seeps into court rulings of cases of such violence.

Methodology/approach

Using archival data from 164 Supreme Court case decisions on domestic violence in India for the period 1995–2011, we examine both the patterns of conviction and the complexities of gender relations within the family by systematically coding the Court’s rulings.

Findings

Analysis of court rulings show that mothers-in-law were convicted in 14% cases and the husband was convicted in 41% cases. We call attention to the collective nature of the domestic violence crime in India where mothers-in-law were seldom convicted alone (3% of cases) but were more likely to be convicted along with other members of the family. Two dominant themes we discuss are the gendered nature of familial relations beyond the intimate partner relationship and the pervasiveness of such gendered relationships from the natal home to the marital family making victims of domestic violence isolated and “homeless.”

Research limitations/implications

Future research may benefit from using data in addition to the judgments to consider caste and class differences in the rulings. An intersectionality perspective may add to the understanding of the interpretation of the laws by the courts.

Social implications

Insights from this paper have important policy implications. As discussed in the paper, the unintended support for violence from the natal family is an indication of their powerlessness and therefore further victimization through the law will not help. It is critical that natal families re-frame their powerlessness which is often derived from their status as families with daughters. Considering that most women in India turn to their natal families first for support when they face violence in their marriages, policy must enable such families to act and utilize the law.

Originality/value

By examining court rulings on cases of domestic violence in India we focus on the power exerted by some women particularly within extended families which is central to understanding gender relations within institutions. These relations are legitimized by the courts in the ways they interpret the law and rule on cases.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Shruti Gupta and Asha Prasad

In the rapidly changing market and environment, companies need to employ highly competitive human resources for sustaining a competitive advantage. Human resource…

Abstract

Purpose

In the rapidly changing market and environment, companies need to employ highly competitive human resources for sustaining a competitive advantage. Human resource management (HRM) practices have a significant impact on firm performance. The purpose of this paper is to identify the key HRM factors from a survey of 41 Indo‐Japanese and 35 Indian firms operating in Delhi and the National Capital Region (NCR) (India) in the automobile sector that affect the productivity and overall performance of firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is largely based on secondary data combined with an analysis of primary data. It includes primary data collection and the usage of quantitative research tools. A comparative analysis of the Indian and Indo‐Japanese firms operating in Delhi and the NCR has also been made. Factor analysis has been undertaken to examine the various HRM factors that affect the productivity of a firm.

Findings

A factor analysis of nine items revealed four underlying dimensions in the instrument. In the case of Indo‐Japanese firms, the factors concerned are: talent planning and engagement; talent motivation; in‐service training; and assessment of training needs. For Indian firms, the factors concerned are: talent acquisition and engagement; talent motivation and need assessment; talent planning; and talent training.

Research limitations/implications

A hybrid model has been developed that combines the relatively important HR variables on the basis of the results of the survey of Indo‐Japanese and Indian firms.

Originality/value

Hitherto, no study has been undertaken to compare the HRM factors of Indian and Indo‐Japanese firms and to subsequently develop a hybrid model. This model blends the features of both types of firms.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Asha Kaul

The case is positioned in the domain of building, managing and communicating corporate reputation. It discusses the entry of Lenovo in the Indian market where the company

Abstract

Subject area

The case is positioned in the domain of building, managing and communicating corporate reputation. It discusses the entry of Lenovo in the Indian market where the company faced reputational challenges. Definition of a corporate reputation strategy which was aligned to the overall strategy of the company, helped Lenovo traverse difficult terrains. The case would be relevant for courses on corporate reputation, communication and strategy.

Study level/applicability

The case is targeted at MBA students, corporate and PR professionals. The case can be used for MBA courses or management development programmes on corporate reputation, communication, and strategy.

Case overview

The case brings out key elements of entry into an emerging market flooded with international, well-positioned players and discusses the entry of Lenovo in the Indian market where the problem was compounded by perceptions of Chinese origin. How does Lenovo bring about a turnaround in positioning, building, communicating and managing reputation, how does it steer stakeholder opinion in its favour? Will Lenovo India be able to replicate the success model in China? The case presents the challenges and discusses the strategies adopted by Amar Babu, MD Lenovo to bring about a change in the existing perceptions of stakeholders.

Expected learning outcomes

To discuss strategies for building corporate reputation.

To critically examine and analyze the strategies adopted by Lenovo India to build reputation and gain market share.

To analyse links between strategy generation and reputation management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available, please consult your librarian to access these.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 30 May 2020

Arti Sharma, Sushanta K. Mishra, Arunava Ghosh and Tuhin Sengupta

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the cultural and ethical dimensions revolving around the issue of female feticide; to apply the lens of institutional…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: to understand the cultural and ethical dimensions revolving around the issue of female feticide; to apply the lens of institutional theory with respective change management measures; and to analyze and evaluate the impact of such intervention programs such as Beti Bachao Beti Padhao in the context of emerging economies such as India.

Case overview/synopsis

This case attempts to highlight the innovative and effective governance approach by the Government of Rajasthan (India) and, in particular, the State Health Assurance Agency to curb the menace of female feticide and the rising cases of abortion and sex determination in an attempt to favor a male child. The case concentrates on mainly three dimensions of Indian societal ecosystem, namely, the grave concern of preference of male child over female child leading to widespread cases of female feticide in different states in India with specific focus on the state of Rajasthan; the role of cultural dimension which primarily drives such preferential treatment in rural and urban areas in India; and the importance of using effective policy measures in monitoring various activities, introduction of incentive schemes to patients for preventing sex determination and promoting the birth of female child.

Complexity academic level

This case can be used as a teaching material in the Public Policy course – Social Welfare and Health Policy, Policy interventions, organization theory and change management at the Graduate/MBA level.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 10: Public Sector Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Anubhuti Saxena, Naval Garg, B.K. Punia and Asha Prasad

The primary objective of the present study is to explore the relationship between workplace spirituality and work stress among offshore and onshore employees of the Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of the present study is to explore the relationship between workplace spirituality and work stress among offshore and onshore employees of the Indian oil and gas industry. The present study also tends to study the difference in the stress level of offshore and onshore employees of the Oil and Gas Industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The size of the sample for the present study was 202 respondents. It includes 128 onshore employees and 74 offshore employees of oil and gas companies. Respondents were mainly managers and supervisors working in various departments of Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC), Cairn India, Reliance India Ltd (RIL), Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd (BPCL) and Indian Oil and Gas Ltd (IOCL). Since the different level of stress is experienced by employees at different stages of the organizational structure, thus study selected population comprising of managers and supervisors since they are believed to face similar work stressors. A variety of statistical tools like mean, t-test, correlation and multi-regression is used for the analysis of collected data.

Findings

Results show that all six dimensions of workplace spirituality are significantly negatively correlated with stress for onshore employees. However, the sense of community and gratitude are found insignificantly associated with stress for offshore employees. Stressful offshore conditions and excessive specialization might not allow offshore employees to cherish the community at the workplace and also the virtue of gratefulness. The offshore employees might have a certain level of gratitude and community system, but it is not sufficient for the employees to perceive a lower level of work relates to stress. The result gives the impression that the normal working conditions (onshore workplace) provide adequate opportunity to workplace spirituality to transcend its impact on work stress.

Originality/value

This is one of the pioneer studies that examined the role of workplace spirituality and stress in stress management of offshore and onshore employees of Indian Oil and gas companies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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