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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Ash E. Faulkner

This article explores the financial literacy resources patrons can discover and/or access on the webpages of the largest 48 US public libraries in order to assess the strength of…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the financial literacy resources patrons can discover and/or access on the webpages of the largest 48 US public libraries in order to assess the strength of public libraries' current support to patrons seeking assistance with personal financial matters.

Design/methodology/approach

The author completed a website analysis of the largest 48 US public libraries, as defined by the four sets of criteria in the American Library Association (ALA) publication. Website analysis was completed via a standardized checklist assessment covering full-site searching, catalog content, the availability of relevant guides and/or workshops, and any other relevant online resources.

Findings

Public libraries provide many resources relevant to patrons searching for personal finance topics, but some of these resources are not ideally highlighted on libraries' websites. Site search tools are generally less efficient than catalog search tools. Only half of the studied libraries have relevant online guides, but all libraries have some relevant online resources.

Originality/value

While there are a number of research articles exploring how public libraries support financial literacy in their communities, there has not yet been an in-depth exploration of how public libraries support this literacy, specifically through the materials highlighted and/or available via their websites. This research addresses this gap in the literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Julie A. Kmec, Lindsey T. O’Connor and Shekinah Hoffman

Building on work that explores the relationship between individual beliefs and ability to recognize discrimination (e.g., Kaiser and Major, 2006), we examine how an adherence to…

Abstract

Building on work that explores the relationship between individual beliefs and ability to recognize discrimination (e.g., Kaiser and Major, 2006), we examine how an adherence to beliefs about gender essentialism, gender egalitarianism, and meritocracy shape one’s interpretation of an illegal act of sexual harassment involving a male supervisor and female subordinate. We also consider whether the role of the gendered culture of engineering (Faulkner, 2009) matters for this relationship. Specifically, we conducted an online survey-experiment asking individuals to report their beliefs about gender and meritocracy and subsequently to evaluate a fictitious but illegal act of sexual harassment in one of two university research settings: an engineering department, a male-dominated setting whose culture is documented as being unwelcoming to women (Hatmaker, 2013; Seron, Silbey, Cech, and Rubineau, 2018), and an ambiguous research setting. We find evidence that the stronger one’s adherence to gender egalitarian beliefs, the greater one’s ability to detect inappropriate behavior and sexual harassment while gender essentialist beliefs play no role in their detection. The stronger one’s adherence to merit beliefs, the less likely they are to view an illegal interaction as either inappropriate or as sexual harassment. We account for respondent knowledge of sexual harassment and their socio-demographic characteristics, finding that the former is more often associated with the detection of inappropriate behavior and sexual harassment at work. We close with a discussion of the transferability of results and policy implications of our findings.

Details

Diversity and Discrimination in Research Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-959-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1971

The review of food consumption elsewhere in this issue shows the broad pattern of food supplies in this country; what and how much we eat. Dietary habits are different to what…

Abstract

The review of food consumption elsewhere in this issue shows the broad pattern of food supplies in this country; what and how much we eat. Dietary habits are different to what they were before the last War, but there have been few real changes since the end of that War. Because of supplies and prices, shifts within commodity groups have occurred, e.g. carcase meat, bread, milk, but overall, the range of foods commonly eaten has remained stable. The rise of “convenience foods” in the twenty‐five year since the War is seen as a change in household needs and the increasing employment of women in industry and commerce, rather than a change in foods eaten or in consumer preference. Supplies available for consumption have remained fairly steady throughout the period, but if the main food sources, energy and nutrient content of the diet have not changed, changes in detail have begun to appear and the broad pattern of food is not quite so markedly stable as of yore.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

David Palmer, Lucy Williams, Sue White, Charity Chenga, Verusca Calabria, Dawn Branch, Sue Arundal, Linda Storer, Chris Ash, Claire Cuthill, Haile Bezuayehu and Eleni Hatzidimitriadou

In 2008, Mind in Bexley received a research development grant from the Big Lottery Fund and a training grant from Bexley Care Trust to empower service users to participate and…

Abstract

In 2008, Mind in Bexley received a research development grant from the Big Lottery Fund and a training grant from Bexley Care Trust to empower service users to participate and contribute to a pilot research project. The project aims were to work with, develop, train and support service users as researchers, in order to record the narratives of service users who have common experiences of mental health distress and treatment. The research development project set up an advisory group, created and developed a partnership with the University of Kent and provided workshops and training sessions to explore some of the principles of research and ethics. In addition, the group undertook a preliminary literature review, developed and refined a research questionnaire and piloted interviews with six service users. Many issues were raised and lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the project. This paper discusses the process and reflects on aspects of the project's design and delivery. In addition, this paper highlights some of the difficulties in undertaking service user research and suggests recommendations as to how to overcome some of these complex issues.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2013

Abstract

Details

Tourism Social Media: Transformations in Identity, Community and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-213-4

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1904

In a volume of the Cornhill Magazine published in the year 1860 we have discovered an article entitled “Adulteration and its Remedy” which well deserves the attention of those…

25

Abstract

In a volume of the Cornhill Magazine published in the year 1860 we have discovered an article entitled “Adulteration and its Remedy” which well deserves the attention of those persons who imagine that we have made “wonderful progress” during the past half century and that the trade morality of to‐day is infinitely superior to the trade morality of the past. The unknown author of this article must have had a very clear appreciation of the nature of the gigantic evil upon which he wrote and of the character and probable effectiveness of the remedies to be applied. The adulteration of the period is described by him as a “strange, disgusting and poisonous demon” and while it is true that at the time, as shown by the revelations of the “Lancet Sanitary Commission,” there existed many forms of gross, disgusting and poisonous adulteration which are but rarely detected nowadays, our author's somewhat hyperbolic definition may still be regarded as applicable. For many of the grosser forms of adulteration prevalent fifty years ago were largely due to the ignorance of the adulterator. His prototype of the present day is no more troubled with moral scruples than he was. The dissemination and absorption of knowledge has not been accompanied, as some rabid “educationalists’ would have us believe, by any improvements in morality and virtue. The “faker ” of to‐day is merely a more skilful “faker” than his predecessor. He knows the value and makes full use of “expert” assistance, both scientific and legal, for the purpose of facilitating his escape—easy enough in any case—from what grip there is in that cranky and lumbering legislative machinery which is innocently supposed by the majority of people in this country to act as a sufficiently effective deterrent and repressant.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 6 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

Patrick J. W. McGinty

The purpose of this conceptual chapter is to analyze the current state of the astructural bias in symbolic interactionism as it relates to three inter-related processes over time…

Abstract

The purpose of this conceptual chapter is to analyze the current state of the astructural bias in symbolic interactionism as it relates to three inter-related processes over time: (1) the formalization of critiques of symbolic interactionism as ahistorical, astructural, and acritical perspectives; (2) an ahistorical understanding of early expressions of the disjuncture between symbolic interactionism and more widely accepted forms of sociological theorizing; and (3) persistent and widespread inattentiveness to past and present evidence-based arguments that address the argument regarding symbolic interactionism as an astructural, ahistorical, and acritical sociological perspective. The argument frames the historical development of the astructural bias concept in an historically and socially conditioned way, from its emergence through its rejection and ultimately including conclusions about contemporary state of the astructural bias as evidenced in the symbolic interactionist literatures of the last couple of decades. The analysis and argument concludes that the contemporary result of these intertwined historical and social conditioning processes is that the astructural bias myth has been made real in practice, and that the reification of the myth of an astructural bias has had the ruinous effect of virtually eradicating a vital tradition in the interactionist perspective which extends back to the earliest formulations of the perspective. As a result, a handful of suggestions that serve to aid in reclaiming the unorthodox structuralism of symbolic interactionism and the related interactionist study of social organization are provided in the conclusion.

Details

The Astructural Bias Charge: Myth or Reality?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-036-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1954

More than once the British Food Journal has had occasion to deplore the inclusion, in official reports to local authorities, of elaborate statistical tables giving the impression…

Abstract

More than once the British Food Journal has had occasion to deplore the inclusion, in official reports to local authorities, of elaborate statistical tables giving the impression that bare figures relating to the examination of samples of food and drugs are of more value than is in fact the case. “Figures by themselves,” said an experienced teacher of arithmetic, “have no meaning.” It is highly gratifying now to find that Mr. A. N. Leather, B.Sc., F.R.I.C., Public Analyst for the City of Manchester, has found time to discuss the problem of summarising laboratory results in such a manner as to convey a far more enlightening meaning than is to be derived from “bare” statistics. Space does not permit the inclusion of the whole of Mr. Leather's comments, but the gist of his argument—which we find most convincing—is here recorded.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 56 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Abstract

Details

Tourism Microentrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-463-2

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