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Article

Serdar Karabati and Arzu Iseri Say

Work and societal values were examined through a 72‐item survey for a sample of nearly six hundred managers, business owners, and professionals in Turkey. Factor analyses…

Abstract

Work and societal values were examined through a 72‐item survey for a sample of nearly six hundred managers, business owners, and professionals in Turkey. Factor analyses revealed eleven work value dimensions and eleven societal value dimensions. A second order factor analysis revealed nine meta‐dimensions among which indigenous concepts of cynical fatalism and under‐ambitious work deserve further attention. Findings also validate comparatively well‐established notions such as paternalism and trust.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article

Kivanc Inelmen, Arzu Iseri Say and Hayat Kabasakal

The objective of the present study is to examine the history, activities, and relationships of a neighbourhood service cooperative, which evolved into a neighbourhood…

Abstract

The objective of the present study is to examine the history, activities, and relationships of a neighbourhood service cooperative, which evolved into a neighbourhood disaster management project that has been adopted by more than 100 neighbourhoods in the north western part of Turkey. In order to understand the core reasons for participation lethargy of the public in community based organizations (CBOs) for disaster preparedness, both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods were employed. An active CBO, at the local level, is shown to have a positive influence on the trustworthiness and perception of responsibility of such organizations by the public. The respondents in this study seem to prefer autonomous and expert actors that formally belong to the centralized state system, such as universities, search and rescue teams, and the military, although they also attribute responsibility to CBOs for disaster related activities and expect some level of leadership from these organizations. The findings point to the direction of a cultural phenomenon, which results in high power distance and low future orientation, coupled with low levels of trust towards institutions and lack of public legitimacy of such organizations. This results in the public avoiding active engagement in preparedness initiatives and suggests the need for an initial leading group to mobilize the community in this area. A set of policy recommendations are provided that will contribute to increasing the effectiveness of CBOs and will allow them become stronger actors in the network of interactions regarding disaster related activities, especially in centralized state systems.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Deniz Kantur and Arzu İşeri‐Say

The purpose of this paper is to understand firm‐level entrepreneurship in diverse organizational contexts and explain its relationship with organizational factors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand firm‐level entrepreneurship in diverse organizational contexts and explain its relationship with organizational factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a multiple‐case research design. In‐depth interviews are conducted with key informants in four cases. In each case, a firm‐level entrepreneurial story is focused on to understand the entrepreneurial process within its organizational context.

Findings

The findings show that there are two types of entrepreneurial activities in organizations – beyond‐boundary focus and within‐boundary focus. They exhibit different patterns regarding their relationship with organizational factors – top management leadership, strategic orientation, organizational culture, internal mechanisms and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability of the results may be limited due to the case study design of this research.

Practical implications

Top management leadership has a vital role in influencing entrepreneurial activity in organizations. When an organizational environment that favours entrepreneurship is supported by top management, then business‐level entrepreneurial activities are cultivated across the company. But if the organizational environment does not favour entrepreneurship, then entrepreneurial activity is mostly limited to the corporate level and only initiated by top management.

Originality/value

The multiple case analyses provide an extensive analysis of the organizational context and firm‐level entrepreneurship. Additionally, the emergent categories of two different types of entrepreneurial activities serve as a major and relevant step to reduce the ambiguity present in the field of study.

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Article

Arzu İşeri‐Say, Ayşegül Toker and Deniz Kantur

The aim of this paper is to determine whether the adoption of management techniques influences organizational performance and to determine the antecedents of adoption.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine whether the adoption of management techniques influences organizational performance and to determine the antecedents of adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a survey method to collect data from 106 large businesses in multiple industries.

Findings

The findings suggest that the adoption of management techniques influences organizational performance, especially when supported by clear vision and mission statements. Organizational and environmental characteristics act as antecedents for adoption.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should focus on efforts for explaining the complex link between adoption and performance.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to knowledge on adoption of management ideas in less developed contexts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Deniz Kantur

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the relationship between firm-level entrepreneurship and organizational performance in an emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the relationship between firm-level entrepreneurship and organizational performance in an emerging economy through assessing the mediating influence of strategic entrepreneurship between entrepreneurial orientation and organizational performance. The extant literature on the relationship between firm-level entrepreneurship and organizational performance points to a lack of clarification of the link between real entrepreneurial events and organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 324 respondents in 118 companies in four different industries. The paper adopts structural equation modeling to test the mediated relationship.

Findings

The results show that strategic entrepreneurship fully mediates the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and organizational performance, assessed as two major categories of financial and non-financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The dominance of four industries in the data set limits the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Findings highlight strategic and practical implications for managers especially in emerging economies who seek to enhance competitive advantage and exploit market opportunities through entrepreneurial initiatives.

Originality/value

The current study develops a measure of strategic entrepreneurship concept and attempts to contribute to the literature through differentiating between behavioral intentions toward entrepreneurship and real entrepreneurial events at the firm-level to serve as a step to reduce the ambiguity present in the field.

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