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Article

Berit Sandberg

Arts-based cooperations between business and the arts create innovative solutions for companies by introducing artistic practices. Cooperations of this nature are…

Abstract

Purpose

Arts-based cooperations between business and the arts create innovative solutions for companies by introducing artistic practices. Cooperations of this nature are predominantly prepared and implemented by intermediaries who act as “matchmakers” and bridge the cultural clash. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

For the present study on the function of such intermediaries, qualitative data material from interviews and case studies on arts-based cooperations was collected and analysed.

Findings

This paper analyses the results from an institutional economics perspective. By drawing on transaction cost theory and information economics, the findings are transformed into an intermediation theory of arts-based cooperations. The theory postulates that intermediaries are able to reduce transaction costs as well as the risks which are contingent on asymmetric information. Involving an intermediary produces cost advantages compared to direct contact between companies and artists.

Originality/value

The analysis illuminates an important but heretofore neglected aspect of arts-based initiatives thus providing an indication for their successful implementation.

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Article

Carsten Baumgarth

This paper aims to present historical examples of collaborations between brand strategists and artists; provide an extensive, structured overview of existing published…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present historical examples of collaborations between brand strategists and artists; provide an extensive, structured overview of existing published research on such collaborations and their effects; present seven papers comprising this special issue; and discuss ideas for further research into brand–art collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an editorial based mainly on an extensive and broad literature review.

Findings

First, this editorial underpins the relevance of brand–art collaboration in the past and present by reference to real examples. Second, it structures the diverse literature into four key aspects of the topic: inspiration, insights, identity and image. Third, it provides a glimpse of the seven papers selected for this special issue. Fourth and finally, it identifies a total of 16 avenues for further research, on four levels (artist, brand owner, consumer and cooperation process).

Originality/value

This editorial and the entire special issue together represent the first anthology on the topic of the interface between brand management and arts. The collection and classification of the existing literature, the formulation of ideas for future research and the content of the seven papers are collectively excellent starting springboards for new and fresh brand research projects.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article

Kelly Mancini Becker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of an arts-based methodology in conducting a doctoral study on The Nile Project, an East African based musical collective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of an arts-based methodology in conducting a doctoral study on The Nile Project, an East African based musical collective. Despite some evidence that music is an effective tool for qualitative inquiry, there are few studies on its use, especially the use of musicking in the interview process.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used a qualitative and arts-based research approach.

Findings

Outcomes suggest that music may help to create an “in-between” space challenging researcher positionality and giving voice to the “researched.” Music also acted as a bridging agent encouraging open and honest dialogue and relationship building.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest that music may be a useful tool for researchers interested in arts-based and participatory methods in qualitative research particularly when interviewing participants with varied linguistic, cultural, political and musical backgrounds.

Originality/value

There is sparse research on the use of musicking in the interview process of qualitative research.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article

Tracy Harwood and Sophy Smith

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings from research that explores the business value of a performance arts-based initiative in supporting change management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings from research that explores the business value of a performance arts-based initiative in supporting change management through devising. Devising is a process that encompasses improvisation to generate social interaction within a community of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A novel approach is reported on: a case study that includes interviews with key members of partner organizations, representing a business, a performance producer and a commissioning agency, participant observation of a member of the performance production film and the devising process.

Findings

Findings presented highlight phases of the devising process and the engagement with the creative practices employed. Findings highlight that benefits emerge through the reflexive nature of activities during the processes of creating the performance, as well as reflection on the final performance piece.

Research limitations/implications

Case study research is necessarily a qualitative design that is not generalizable to a broader population. Findings do, however, highlight potentially useful practices that may be further developed for future research.

Practical implications

Performance arts has pushed previously untested boundaries in employee engagement within the business, resulting in deep understanding between managers and employees on how value may be co-created and redeployed across the business.

Originality/value

The paper extends the application of improvisation by situating it within the creative practice of devising. This enables performance to be critically examined as an arts-based initiative within business contexts.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article

Anugamini Priya Srivastava and Sonal Shree

Inclusive organizations believe in integrating all toward synergistic outcomes. However, the extent to which inclusive education plays their role toward inclusive…

Abstract

Purpose

Inclusive organizations believe in integrating all toward synergistic outcomes. However, the extent to which inclusive education plays their role toward inclusive organizations requires more explorations. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical model exploring authentic leadership (AL) as a predictor of inclusive organization in an Indian school context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper theoretically develops a model to explore and establish inclusive classroom (IC) settings in emerging nations.

Findings

The study further provides academic optimism (AO), a latent term comprising collective efficacy, faculty trust and academic emphasis as its dimensions to intervene the linkage between AL and IC. Since teaching pedagogies help teachers to express their real intentions, this study also posits art-based innovation pedagogy as a future-oriented art pedagogy to strengthen the effect of teachers’ AO on IC.

Originality/value

This study will benefit the practitioners and academicians to re-design their policies and practices in developing nation education system.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

Jessie Nixon

This paper aims to demonstrate how teaching the discourse of critique, an integral part of the video production process, can be used to eliminate barriers for young people…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how teaching the discourse of critique, an integral part of the video production process, can be used to eliminate barriers for young people in gaining new media literacy skills helping more young people become producers rather than consumers of digital media.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes an instrumental qualitative case study (Stake, 2000) in two elective high school video production classrooms in the Midwestern region of the USA. The author conducted observations, video and audio recorded critique sessions, conducted semi-structured interviews and collected artifacts throughout production including storyboards, brainstorms and rough and final cuts of videos.

Findings

Throughout critique, young video producers used argumentation strategies to cocreate meaning, multiple methods of inquiry and questioning, critically evaluated feedback and synthesized their ideas and those of their peers to achieve their intended artistic vision. Young video producers used feedback in the following ways: incorporated feedback directly into their work, rejected and ignored feedback, or incorporated some element of the feedback in a way not originally intended.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how teaching the discourse of critique can be used to eliminate barriers for young people in gaining new media literacy skills. Educators can teach argumentation and inquiry strategies through using thinking guides that encourage active processing and through engaging near peer mentors. Classroom educators can integrate the arts-based practice of the pitch critique session to maximize the impact of peer-to-peer learning.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Content available
Article

Steven de Groot

Collaboration between creative professionals (artists and designers) and companies has become more prominent. In so-called “crossovers,” indicated with the acronym CoCreaCO

Abstract

Purpose

Collaboration between creative professionals (artists and designers) and companies has become more prominent. In so-called “crossovers,” indicated with the acronym CoCreaCO (collaboration of creative professionals with companies) when they concern specific crossover of creative professionals with companies, societal and organizational challenges such as becoming more innovative are addressed through multidisciplinary collaboration that increasingly embraces and exploits the distinctive way of thinking and working of artists and designers. Over the past years, several scholars focused their research on the effect of artistic interventions or arts-based initiatives (ABIs) and design thinking in organizations. Hardly any research has been done on the conditions (organizational and individual factors) that are conducive to ABIs in organizations, such as trust and common ground. The central question for this study is which conditions foster successful collaboration between creative professionals and organizations in crossovers. For this study, the conditions for collaboration between creative professionals and four Dutch organizations were studied by interviewing ten creative professionals, project managers and employees who worked together, following which a survey of 60 questions was filled in by 41 Dutch respondents. This study shows that despite the differences between the disciplines of creative professionals and employees for this type of crossover, both disciplines requested quite similar conditions for collaboration. Both creative professionals and employees should realize and encourage trust and common ground by focusing on an open process and outcome, a shared creative process started with a shared problem. Experience with this type of collaboration, art disciplines, the role and qualities of the artist (individual factors) as well as the organization's sector seem to influence neither expectations of collaboration nor the intention to engage in this type of cooperation in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Both ten employees (project managers) and creative professional(s) with whom the organization cooperated were interviewed (four case studies, semistructured interviews). Thereafter, 41 respondents have been filled in a survey.

Findings

Successful cooperation can be explained by six concepts of determinants, which are briefing, qualities of creative professionals, organizational qualities, organization factors and common ground. More particular, creative professionals' independency and their ability to render observations and to reflect of these and organization's role by informing employees and organizing a clear work process need to be addressed before or during collaboration.

Originality/value

past years, many scholars focused their research on the effects of artistic interventions or ABIs and design thinking in organizations. There is hardly any research on the conditions that are conductive to artistic interventions in organizations such as trust and common ground.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

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Article

Margaret L. Page and Hugo Gaggiotti

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the practices and findings of a visual inquiry developed by the co‐authors with students in a Business School in the south west…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the practices and findings of a visual inquiry developed by the co‐authors with students in a Business School in the south west of England. The authors are interested in how students engaged with the visual as a practice of inquiry and how this contributed to their development of a critical approach to the concept of ethics in business organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Students visited an exhibition shown as part of the 100 days countdown to the COP15 UN climate change conference, and constructed visual representation of questions and dilemmas related to ethical business practice. The analysis focuses on student presentations, and the discussions that these provoked on the relationship between “business” and “ethical practice”.

Findings

Doing co‐inquiry with visual images enabled many students to engage more proactively with ethical dilemmas; to attend to deeply felt values that they were not accustomed to bring into the rule bound environment of the classroom; to develop critical readings of the visual as a discourse about business organisations and their claims to ethical practice; and to create their own visual representations of ethical dilemmas within business practice.

Originality/value

The research methodology brings together inquiry‐based learning and visual inquiry in the context of undergraduate learning in a business school. The paper considers the significance of the methodology and findings as a contribution to visual inquiry methodology and practice, and as a medium for enabling students in a business school to develop their ethical sensibility.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article

George Boak and Sarah Crabbe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a training intervention designed to develop and encourage the use of coaching skills in a small arts-based

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a training intervention designed to develop and encourage the use of coaching skills in a small arts-based organisation and assess the factors that appear to have influenced this impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The programme, its effects and factors that influenced its impact were assessed through ongoing feedback and evaluation and through information gathered in a focus group and in one-to-one interviews with participants at the conclusion of the programme.

Findings

The programme had individual and organisational benefits, including improved skills in communication and problem-solving and a better understanding of a range of problems affecting the organisation. Factors enabling these benefits included participation of senior managers in the programme and coaching practice that focused on real workplace issues. Factors limiting these benefits included a lack of a clear statement about the purpose of the programme.

Research limitations/implications

This relates to a programme within a single organisation, and the findings may not be generalisable.

Practical implications

Through training individuals in coaching skills, it is possible to improve the skills needed for cooperative working and joint problem-solving. A corporate training programme in coaching skills can surface a range of organisational problems and enable progress to be made in tackling them.

Originality/value

There is little empirical research evaluating the impact of training in coaching skills. This paper identifies how such training can develop leadership skills and indicates practical factors that may enhance or limit the impact of the training.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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