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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2018

P. N. Sankaran

Traditional artisans are the worst victims of globalisation and corporate entry into their local economy and hand-driven production processes. For their rehabilitation…

Abstract

Traditional artisans are the worst victims of globalisation and corporate entry into their local economy and hand-driven production processes. For their rehabilitation, protection, preservation and promotion of cultural heritage, embedded, inter alia, in the built environment, a suitable framework need to be crafted within the broad domain of mandatory corporate social responsibility (CSR) envisaged under The Indian Companies Act, 2013. Conceived in the above backdrop, the study attempts to situate traditional artisans as stakeholders worthy of development interventions under CSR. For want of studies and notable interventions in the above context, few small CSR cases are reviewed and a number of worthwhile areas of interventions are proposed in terms of a wish list, drawn from the socio, economic, educational, employment and cultural milieu of traditional artisans. It is found that they come under the discretionary category of stakeholders, who possess the attribute of legitimacy, but they have no power to influence the firms and no urgent claims. The study points to the necessity for establishing a National Artisans’ Rehabilitation and Development Fund, besides artisan-friendly sharpening of the schedule of CSR activities in the Indian context.

Details

Redefining Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-162-5

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2006

Andrés Marroquín Gramajo

This chapter claims that there are characteristics of the institutional structure of some indigenous societies that in some cases prevent economic development by…

Abstract

This chapter claims that there are characteristics of the institutional structure of some indigenous societies that in some cases prevent economic development by complicating the emergence of extra-family networks (social capital), and the transition from personal to impersonal exchange; this is illustrated in the context of the Wayúu people from the Guajira Peninsula of Colombia. They have a strong tradition of craft production, which has changed much in recent years due to exigencies of Wayúu and non-Wayúu consumers. Foreign elements, such as commercial brands, are commonly included today in their traditional crafts, sometimes even replacing conventional motifs. However, artisans behave strategically – selling different designs to different markets. The main economic difficulties of the Wayúu artisans are related to the lack of commercialization of their products. From an institutional analysis perspective, the absence of extra-family social and commercial networks in locations relatively far from markets, it is argued, is one of the factors explaining these problems. It is suggested also that the promotion of cooperatives should be attempted from the bottom-up given the particular legal characteristics of this society.

Those who know it, believe it

Those who don’t know it, don’t believe it

We who know, believe it

– Old Wayúu proverb

Details

Choice in Economic Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-375-4

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2006

Patricia L. Kelly Spurles

Henna, a vegetable dye made from ground henna leaves that is used by Moroccan women to create temporary designs for the hands and feet, has become a profitable tourist…

Abstract

Henna, a vegetable dye made from ground henna leaves that is used by Moroccan women to create temporary designs for the hands and feet, has become a profitable tourist sector service in the past decade. The social organization and relations of tourist sector henna artisans in the Marrakesh area are closely tied to how the spaces where they work are socially constructed and re-constructed. The artisans’ assertive public behavior directed at strangers is socially disapproved, and highlighted in interactions between the artisans and representatives of the state as well as guides and shopkeepers. Artisans working in public squares organize into multi-function cooperative groups in order to preserve claim to a given space, share supplies and skills, and provide a peer group in and through which reputation is maintained. Alternative spatial arrangements, such as work in herb shops and independent henna shops, correspond with greater conformity to gender norms.

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Choice in Economic Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-375-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Inge R. Hill

The article's purpose is to demonstrate how UK artisan entrepreneurs organise entrepreneurial activities within the context of a creative industry organisation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The article's purpose is to demonstrate how UK artisan entrepreneurs organise entrepreneurial activities within the context of a creative industry organisation. The research asks how artisan entrepreneurs draw on contexts to manage entrepreneurial activities. The article investigates how these entrepreneurs organise collaborative business solutions through the lens of entrepreneurial capitals and their conversion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study employed a phenomenological approach to analyse the situated entrepreneurial activities of artisan entrepreneurs. Ethnographic methods assisted in capturing these activities.

Findings

The findings demonstrated the context-dependent collaborative business solutions by artisan entrepreneurs. Such solutions emerge from the interplay of the materiality of buildings, social relations management and personal resources. This materiality facilitates creative forms of social relations management for entrepreneurial activities between artisan entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The discussed entrepreneurial collaborative solutions are beneficial for many entrepreneurs in fragmented working conditions.

Originality/value

The detailed discussion of how artisan entrepreneurs organise entrepreneurial activities individually and collaboratively sheds light on dynamic microprocesses in context. The lens of entrepreneurial capitals and their conversion for these microprocesses integrates the literature on capital conversions with context as the main contribution to theory. This lens allows to home in on social relations and material environment management adding more fine-grained insights into how these micro-exchange processes work. These insights contribute to the literature on artisan entrepreneurship in the creative industries and entrepreneurship and context.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Jialu Liang, Honglian Cong, Zhe Gao, Aijun Zhang and Zhijia Dong

The weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric has the characteristics of complicated design principle and hard technical design. The purpose of this paper is to realize the…

Abstract

Purpose

The weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric has the characteristics of complicated design principle and hard technical design. The purpose of this paper is to realize the computer-aided design of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric, and provide a certain reference for the development of this type of fabric.

Design/methodology/approach

The weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric is divided into weft-knitted two-side similar pattern jacquard fabric and weft-knitted two-side independent pattern jacquard fabric. In order to achieve the purpose of this study, firstly, the structural characteristic of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric is analyzed. Then, the design principle of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric is studied. Next, the technical model of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric is established. Finally, the CAD flow chart of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric is proposed to realize the rapid product development.

Findings

Based on the above method, through the development example of weft two-side similar pattern jacquard fabric and weft two-side independent pattern jacquard fabric, the computer-aided design of the weft two-side jacquard fabric is verified.

Research limitations/implications

Because of limited research studies, three-dimensional computer-aided design of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric loop structure will be studied in the further research, and the technical design speed needs to be improved to meet the needs of large patterns and positioning patterns.

Practical implications

The computer-aided design of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric will offer a certain reference for product development, technical principles, performance research and computer simulation for the in-depth study of the fabric.

Social implications

The computer-aided design of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric will simplify the fabric design process and improve the efficiency of new fabric development, and provide the industries a time-saving and cost-saving approach for new fabrics development.

Originality/value

The author analyzes the structural characteristic of the fabric by the physical fabric, summarizes design principle of the fabric through production process, uses mathematical methods to establish a three-dimensional technical model of the fabric, and proposes the CAD flow chart of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric, which has good theoretical significance and practice of weft-knitted two-side jacquard fabric.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Funmilola Olubunmi Omotayo and Samuel Oyelami Babalola

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing knowledge sharing (KS) among information and communication technology (ICT) artisans in Nigeria by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing knowledge sharing (KS) among information and communication technology (ICT) artisans in Nigeria by adopting the social exchange and social capital theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research design was adopted. Convenience and snowball sampling techniques were used to select the respondents. In total, 285 copies of questionnaire were distributed, of which 214 copies were considered useful for data analysis, giving a 75.09 per cent response rate.

Findings

The results show that the gender of the artisans, perceived benefits, social identification, shared language and goals had positive significant and relationships with KS except social identification where the relationship was negative.

Research limitations/implications

The findings and conclusion from this paper are subjected to a number of limitations. Because the population was limited to a small population and the study adopted convenience and snowball techniques, the results cannot be generalised to all ICT artisans in Nigeria.

Practical implications

The paper confirms the role of social exchange and social capital theories in interpreting individual’s behaviour in KS and provides useful insights on how to implement good KS practices among the artisans.

Social implications

This paper could assist policymakers in promoting and implementing KS practices among professionals and quasi-professionals who contribute to the gross domestic product of the country.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first pieces of empirical research on KS among information technology artisans in Nigeria that used the social exchange and social capital theories.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Josep F. Mària SJ and Miho Taka

The purpose of this paper is to explore how corporate social responsibility (CSR) in mining companies can contribute to the promotion of artisanal miners' human rights…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how corporate social responsibility (CSR) in mining companies can contribute to the promotion of artisanal miners' human rights (HR) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Design/methodology/approach

First, the paper designs a framework for a public policy on artisans, then it incorporates the possible contribution of companies to this policy drawing from the existent CSR literature. This framework is applied to relationships between mining companies and artisans in Katanga, a low‐conflict Province of the DRC. Finally, CSR guidelines for the promotion of artisans' HR are formulated. The theoretical framework articulates a public policy approach – which includes different actors – and a CSR approach – which develops the specific role of one such actor: the company – in the promotion of artisanal miners' HR. Data used in the empirical part are qualitative and include primary data gathered from visits to different mining companies operating in the Province and an interview with a local specialist in artisanal miners.

Findings

The first finding is that artisanal miners are a heterogeneous group, with multiple HR problems. Therefore, a public policy and a CSR policy to promote their HR are equally complex issues. However, local practices in the specific context of Katanga suggest two suitable CSR strategies for promoting artisans' HR: supporting new sustainable economic activities where artisans have been displaced by a company; and promoting the formalization of artisanal activity where companies are the artisans' clients.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not include interviews with mining company managers in Katanga in order to design very specific actions in each one of these CSR strategies. The research does not include field work in high‐conflict areas.

Practical implications

The heterogeneity and dynamism of artisanal miners' problems and the weakness of the Congolese State lead to a basic recommendation for responsible mining companies in low‐conflict areas: the implementation of dialogues with local communities and local governments in order to cover the needs of artisanal miners and discover innovation opportunities for the companies.

Originality/value

Although there is abundant literature on artisanal miners, the connection of artisanal miners and CSR has scarcely been developed. As far as the author knows, the illustration of this connection for the DRC has not been addressed. Additionally, the design of public policies for artisanal miners – part of the informal economy – and the contribution of companies to such policies can help address problems arising from other informal activities in Africa.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Ricardo Alonzo Cortez Arias and Allan Discua Cruz

There is a growing interest in artisan entrepreneurs around the world. Scholars are increasingly interested in how artisan enterprises use tourism in a…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing interest in artisan entrepreneurs around the world. Scholars are increasingly interested in how artisan enterprises use tourism in a resource-constrained resources. Based on the concept of artisan chocolate entrepreneur, the purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of artisanal chocolate making in a small island with limited resources yet influenced by increased tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Artisan enterprises are considered relevant in developing countries and their creation merits further attention. This study examines artisan enterprises using in-depth interviews, case studies, and an interpretative approach. The approach enables examining how artisan chocolate enterprises use tourism to develop their businesses in a context characterized by limited resources.

Findings

The findings show that artisan entrepreneurs are encouraged to start and develop enterprises due to lifestyle choices. The findings reveal a connection between artisan chocolatiers developing place-bound features to address a growing demand of tourists’ expectation for authentic and local products. The approach of artisan entrepreneurs in such conditions can be explained through entrepreneurial bricolage.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on the initial stages of artisan enterprises particularly in resource-constrained environments influenced by tourism. More specifically, the study provides evidence of the relevance of tourism for artisanal enterprise emergence, which is a relatively overlooked area in tourism and artisanal studies in developing countries. The study highlights the key place bound features that artisanal chocolate entrepreneurs associate to their products based on tourists’ demand for authentic and local products.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Case study
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Aashish Mehra, Nidhi Mathur and Vaibhav Tripathi

The learning objectives of this case are as follows: identify and understand the major challenges/problems faced by a social enterprise in promoting handicraft business;…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning objectives of this case are as follows: identify and understand the major challenges/problems faced by a social enterprise in promoting handicraft business; examine the value chain architecture of handicraft products; assess the role of the protagonist (Sanjay) as a social change agent in shaping a successful social enterprise; assess Sahaj Crafts' initiatives and analyze whether the key intervention/s planned/executed were required for skilling up of rural artisans and upgradation of handicraft business; know the marketing strategies for handicraft products; and understand the “strategies” which need to be applied for uplifting people's lives at the bottom of pyramid in general and for enlivening of artisans’ clusters in particular. The outcomes are as follows: examining the value chain architecture of handicraft product; understanding the difficulties and challenges of structuring a viable social business model; examining the role of Sanjay as a social change agent in shaping a successful social enterprise; and examining the model of Craft Incubation Center and design education proposed by Sahaj Crafts for improving rural artisans’ livelihood and skills upgradation.

Case overview/synopsis

Sanjay Joshi – the promoter and CEO of “Sahaj Crafts” (a social enterprise established in Western Rajasthan, India), an initiative to strengthen indigenous skills and mainstream rural craft products and artworks – is faced with the question of how to scale up his organization’s operations. Doing so requires that he address these fundamental challenges in terms of – how to deal with unorganized craft communities; match up product orientation to market demands; integrate modern technology / processes in craft business; combat restricted mobility of women artisans; and make effective interventions so that the artisans learn and enjoy working in the current model and solve the financial issues faced by the social enterprise. Providing effective and implementable answers to those questions is vital to Sahaj Craft’s development in attaining its mission to alleviate poverty in the region. Failing to expand operations above a critical scale may leave Sahaj Crafts vulnerable in meeting sufficient demand for contemporary craft products in the mainstream markets.

Complexity academic level

This case study is primarily suitable for post-graduate level management students to teach the concepts of designing and operationalizing a “social” business model in a social entrepreneurship module. This case study can also be used for highlighting business model innovations in the social sector of emerging markets. The case could be taught in the following academic domains: social entrepreneurship; bottom of the pyramid; social inclusion; supply chain consolidation (vertical integration in a value chain); marketing strategies for handicraft products; branding; brand positioning; cost and management accounting.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2017

Cécile Petitgand

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of introducing business tools into nonprofit organizations (NPOs). Exploring the case of an NPO trying to embrace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of introducing business tools into nonprofit organizations (NPOs). Exploring the case of an NPO trying to embrace the social enterprise model, this study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the managerialization process affecting third sector organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on an in-depth ethnographic immersion conducted at a Brazilian NPO, this paper adopts a performativity lens to analyze the appropriation process of a traditional business tool, the Individual Development Plan (IDP), at the organization.

Findings

The story of the IDP’s appropriation reveals how business tools act as market devices to actualize economic behaviors and representations among NPOs’ beneficiaries. Reinforcing the control of managers upon their constituencies, business tools can thus create an unequal balance of power within NPOs.

Practical implications

Admittedly, this paper relies on one single case study, which imposes strong limitations to generalize empirical findings. Nonetheless, this analysis calls for more caution in the promotion of business tools for the development of social entrepreneurship in third sector organizations.

Originality/value

Rather than debating the accuracy and efficiency of business tools in NPOs, this paper adopts a performative approach to understand how artifacts change the nature of relationships between managers and beneficiaries within social ventures. Rejecting a normative stance, this paper proposes a micro-level analysis of managerialization, focusing on an organization from an emerging country, Brazil, which is rarely at the core of social entrepreneurship studies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000