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Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Vanessa Ratten

Artisan entrepreneurs create social value by engaging in community business practices. Research has shown that the motives of artisan entrepreneurs differ based on the way…

Abstract

Artisan entrepreneurs create social value by engaging in community business practices. Research has shown that the motives of artisan entrepreneurs differ based on the way they are embedded in society. This is due to artisan practices varying significantly. As such, it is useful to analyze the existing body of research with the aim of opening up new opportunities. To date, there has been limited research on artisan entrepreneurship compared to other sub-types of entrepreneurship. This is unusual as artisan entrepreneurship is an interesting topic. This chapter therefore seeks to ascertain what is lacking in the current research and what needs to be done. This will be conducted through a critique of the existing research, which leads to a discussion on the managerial implications of artisan entrepreneurship.

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Natasha Katuta Mwila

Artisan businesses in Africa have distinct ways of being that make them peculiar to manage when compared to non-artisanal enterprises. Artisan businesses are often…

Abstract

Artisan businesses in Africa have distinct ways of being that make them peculiar to manage when compared to non-artisanal enterprises. Artisan businesses are often developed on the basis of tacit knowledge that is passed on from one generation to the next through an apprenticeship model. Furthermore, these businesses are often driven by an intersection of necessity motives (the need for the artisan to make a living) and opportunity (the honing of a valued handicraft that can be monetized). The challenge for artisanal businesses of this nature is therefore broadly twofold: firstly, the sustainability of the enterprise due to knowledge transfer challenges; and secondly, the motivation of artisanal apprentices who are preoccupied with meeting their livelihood needs over the opportunity to practice a craft. This case study presents an insight into how these challenges playout but also an insight into how these challenges can be overcome. Kazuri Beads have survived these challenges for over 40 years and therefore is an ideal showcase of how an artisan business can be established, grown and sustained in the long run.

Details

Artisan Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-078-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Vanessa Ratten

Wine has been considered an artisan product for a long period of time. This is due to the cultural heritage and history that goes into the production process. The aim of…

Abstract

Wine has been considered an artisan product for a long period of time. This is due to the cultural heritage and history that goes into the production process. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the role of wine artisans in the global economy in terms of tourism and the esthetic cognition apparent in rural landscapes. To do this, the role of customers as co-creators of the wine experience is discussed, which helps to understand the evolving nature of the wine industry. The way artisan forms of wine are being produced because of eco-innovation reasons are stated. This enables more information to be obtained about the nature of wine artisan entrepreneurship. Theoretical and practical implications are stated together with suggestions for future research.

Details

Artisan Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-078-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

S. Meera and A. Vinodan

This study aims to examine individual-specific market orientation as an innovative approach and its relationship with marketing skills among artisan entrepreneurs in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine individual-specific market orientation as an innovative approach and its relationship with marketing skills among artisan entrepreneurs in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an in-depth interview to explore variables, a questionnaire survey to understand their latent dimensions through exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to test the relationship between constructs under study.

Findings

The interview result indicates that 20 variables explain factors affecting individual-specific market orientation with four latent dimensions: customer orientation, competitor orientation, external coordination orientation and personal selling orientation. There is a significant and positive relationship between customer orientation and personal selling orientation with the marketing skills of artisan entrepreneurs in India.

Research limitations/implications

The study is confined to three southern states of India and weaving villages known for their endemic product specifications.

Practical implications

The study found significance in orienting artisan entrepreneurs of developing countries and equipping them with desired skills to meet the changing dynamics of the market and meet their livelihood needs. The study further supports policymaking in strengthening the capability of artisans to enter the market without mediators.

Social implications

The model provides insight into other unorganized sectors to formulate innovative approaches to strengthen marketing skills and entrepreneurial ability.

Originality/value

As an exploratory study, examining individual-level market orientation as an innovative approach and their relationship with marketing skills among artisan entrepreneurs was unexplored in several unorganized sectors, including handlooms.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2018

P. N. Sankaran

Traditional artisans are the worst victims of globalisation and corporate entry into their local economy and hand-driven production processes. For their rehabilitation…

Abstract

Traditional artisans are the worst victims of globalisation and corporate entry into their local economy and hand-driven production processes. For their rehabilitation, protection, preservation and promotion of cultural heritage, embedded, inter alia, in the built environment, a suitable framework need to be crafted within the broad domain of mandatory corporate social responsibility (CSR) envisaged under The Indian Companies Act, 2013. Conceived in the above backdrop, the study attempts to situate traditional artisans as stakeholders worthy of development interventions under CSR. For want of studies and notable interventions in the above context, few small CSR cases are reviewed and a number of worthwhile areas of interventions are proposed in terms of a wish list, drawn from the socio, economic, educational, employment and cultural milieu of traditional artisans. It is found that they come under the discretionary category of stakeholders, who possess the attribute of legitimacy, but they have no power to influence the firms and no urgent claims. The study points to the necessity for establishing a National Artisans’ Rehabilitation and Development Fund, besides artisan-friendly sharpening of the schedule of CSR activities in the Indian context.

Details

Redefining Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-162-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2006

Andrés Marroquín Gramajo

This chapter claims that there are characteristics of the institutional structure of some indigenous societies that in some cases prevent economic development by…

Abstract

This chapter claims that there are characteristics of the institutional structure of some indigenous societies that in some cases prevent economic development by complicating the emergence of extra-family networks (social capital), and the transition from personal to impersonal exchange; this is illustrated in the context of the Wayúu people from the Guajira Peninsula of Colombia. They have a strong tradition of craft production, which has changed much in recent years due to exigencies of Wayúu and non-Wayúu consumers. Foreign elements, such as commercial brands, are commonly included today in their traditional crafts, sometimes even replacing conventional motifs. However, artisans behave strategically – selling different designs to different markets. The main economic difficulties of the Wayúu artisans are related to the lack of commercialization of their products. From an institutional analysis perspective, the absence of extra-family social and commercial networks in locations relatively far from markets, it is argued, is one of the factors explaining these problems. It is suggested also that the promotion of cooperatives should be attempted from the bottom-up given the particular legal characteristics of this society.

Those who know it, believe it

Those who don’t know it, don’t believe it

We who know, believe it

– Old Wayúu proverb

Details

Choice in Economic Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-375-4

Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2006

Patricia L. Kelly Spurles

Henna, a vegetable dye made from ground henna leaves that is used by Moroccan women to create temporary designs for the hands and feet, has become a profitable tourist…

Abstract

Henna, a vegetable dye made from ground henna leaves that is used by Moroccan women to create temporary designs for the hands and feet, has become a profitable tourist sector service in the past decade. The social organization and relations of tourist sector henna artisans in the Marrakesh area are closely tied to how the spaces where they work are socially constructed and re-constructed. The artisans’ assertive public behavior directed at strangers is socially disapproved, and highlighted in interactions between the artisans and representatives of the state as well as guides and shopkeepers. Artisans working in public squares organize into multi-function cooperative groups in order to preserve claim to a given space, share supplies and skills, and provide a peer group in and through which reputation is maintained. Alternative spatial arrangements, such as work in herb shops and independent henna shops, correspond with greater conformity to gender norms.

Details

Choice in Economic Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-375-4

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Vanessa Ratten and Petrus Usmanij

Artisan entrepreneurship is a new and emerging area of entrepreneurship study. This means literature on the topic is still relatively sparse, so more attention is required…

Abstract

Artisan entrepreneurship is a new and emerging area of entrepreneurship study. This means literature on the topic is still relatively sparse, so more attention is required on addressing issues of content, context and method. This chapter focuses on future research trajectories on artisan entrepreneurship that will help to refine the field. This includes analyzing the way artisan entrepreneurship can be researched from an organization, team and individual level. Specific ideas related to new research tracks are stated that help to direct researchers to new and novel topics.

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Anisa Azharunnisa, Sumana Gupta and Sudha Panda

The purpose of this paper is to create optimally located Facilitation Centers on this tourist circuit, evaluated through network analysis, thus creating an effective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create optimally located Facilitation Centers on this tourist circuit, evaluated through network analysis, thus creating an effective linkage between tourism and economic activities of the craftsmen who are the custodians of the cultural heritage of Puri.

Design/methodology/approach

The craft villages lying in and around this tourist circuit are surveyed to establish socio-economic condition of artisans, significance of the craft and spatial distribution of craft villages and the willingness of artisans to travel closer to the transport spine. Network analysis is used to assess the suitability of Facilitation Center location using travel time and distance as parameters. Finally, the sustainability of the Facilitation Centers is evaluated using a cost-benefit analysis (CBA).

Findings

The Facilitation Centers can be spatially developed at the strategic locations to expand tourist market. This will help in leveraging the economic benefits of tourism to a marginalized rural artisan community by creating a sustainable model.

Originality/value

The focus on festival can help to protect local cultural traditions, develop tourism and promote the economic, social and cultural developments of the destination. Dispersal strategies adopted aim to increase visitors' satisfaction with the product and thus entice them to stay longer in the destination.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Doreen E. Sams, Mary Kay Rickard and Aruna Sadasivan

This study creates new knowledge that addresses issues significant enough to warrant intellectual engagement. It fills a gap in the academic and practitioner literature by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study creates new knowledge that addresses issues significant enough to warrant intellectual engagement. It fills a gap in the academic and practitioner literature by examining a profitable yet understudied cottage industry (artisan vendors). It examines marketing concepts that influence dedication to authentic craftsmanship and artisans' willingness to continue in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines historical evidence and connects it with subjective and interpretive analyses from 29 in-depth interviews of today's US artisan vendors to identify sustainable marketing best practices for the industry.

Findings

Researchers uncovered factors behind artisan vendors' willingness to stay committed to their craft and remain in the industry. From the findings of this study, marketing best practices (branding, brand communities and product adaptation while remaining authentic to their craft) were identified as tools for resilience and remaining a viable competitor in the marketplace.

Originality/value

Historically, artisan vendors have been engaging in marketing practices before terms defined their activities. Thus, this study is original in that it contributes to the academic literature by first conducting an analysis of the history of an understudied cottage industry (artisan vendors) starting in the Mesopotamian Era. The key marketing factors discovered in the historical study contributing to the resilience of this industry were then used to conceptualize a qualitative study of the highly profitable US artisan vendor industry.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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