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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Amparo Nagore García and Arthur van Soest

Using administrative data from the Spanish Social Security Administration, the purpose of this paper is to analyse the nature and stability of job matches starting during the…

Abstract

Purpose

Using administrative data from the Spanish Social Security Administration, the purpose of this paper is to analyse the nature and stability of job matches starting during the economic boom in 2005 and during the recession in 2009.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare the individual, job, and firm characteristics in the two samples and estimate a competing risk model distinguishing job-to-job, job-to-unemployment, and other transitions.

Findings

The authors find that job-to-job transitions are pro-cyclical, while unemployment transitions are counter-cyclical. Individuals most affected by the economic crisis tend to be young males, living in regions with high unemployment rates, with low qualifications and working in manual occupations (particularly construction), and (especially Spanish speaking) immigrants.

Originality/value

The positive relation between job stability and firm size is stronger during the recession than during the boom.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Arthur van Soest

Legal minimum wage rates for young workers were introduced in TheNetherlands in 1974. After substantial increases during the 1970s,youth minimum wages were lowered in the 1980s…

1541

Abstract

Legal minimum wage rates for young workers were introduced in The Netherlands in 1974. After substantial increases during the 1970s, youth minimum wages were lowered in the 1980s, in response to the large increase of youth unemployment. Analyses the employment effects of lowering youth minimum wages. Looks at macro and micro evidence. At the macro level, does not find convincing evidence of negative effects of youth minimum wages on youth employment. Constructs a micro model in which an individual′s labour market state can be affected by the sign of potential earnings minus the relevant minimum wage. The model is estimated with data from 1984 and 1987. Finds significant minimum wage elasticities of employment and unemployment, with expected signs.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 15 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2011

Solomon W. Polachek and Konstantinos Tatsiramos

How individuals allocate their time between work and leisure has important implications regarding worker well-being. For example, more time at work means a greater return to human…

Abstract

How individuals allocate their time between work and leisure has important implications regarding worker well-being. For example, more time at work means a greater return to human capital and a greater proclivity to seek more training opportunities. At the same time, hours spent at work decrease leisure and depend on one's home environment (including parental background), health, past migration, and government policies. In short, worker well-being depends on trade-offs and is influenced by public policy. These decisions entail time allocation, effort, human capital investment, health, and migration, among other choices. This volume considers worker well-being from the vantage of each of these alternatives. It contains ten chapters. The first three are on time allocation and work behavior, the next three on aspects of risk in the earnings process, the next two on aspects of migration, the next one on the impact of tax policies on poverty, and finally the last chapter on the role of labor market institutions on sectoral shifts in employment.

Details

Research in Labor Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-333-0

Book part
Publication date: 21 April 2010

Solomon W. Polachek and Konstantinos Tatsiramos

Early models of the functional distribution of income assume constant labor productivity among all individuals. Not until human capital theory developed did scholars take into…

Abstract

Early models of the functional distribution of income assume constant labor productivity among all individuals. Not until human capital theory developed did scholars take into account how productivity varied across workers. According to early human capital models, this variation came about because each individual invested differently in education and training. Those acquiring greater amounts of schooling and on-the-job training earned more. However, these models neglected why one person would get training while another would not. One explanation is individual heterogeneity. Some individuals are smarter, some seek risk, some have time preferences for the future over the present, some simply are lucky by being in the right place at the right time, and some are motivated by the pay incentives of the jobs they are in. This volume contains 10 chapters, each dealing with an aspect of earnings. Of these, the first three deal directly with earnings distribution, the next four with job design and remuneration, the next two with discrimination, and the final chapter with wage rigidities in the labor market.

Details

Jobs, Training, and Worker Well-being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-766-0

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2022

Wiebke Eberhardt, Thomas Post, Chantal Hoet and Elisabeth Brüggen

The authors develop and validate a conceptual model, the retirement engagement model (REM), to understand the relationships between behavioral engagement (retirement information…

3438

Abstract

Purpose

The authors develop and validate a conceptual model, the retirement engagement model (REM), to understand the relationships between behavioral engagement (retirement information search), cognitive factors and engagement (e.g. beliefs and financial knowledge), emotional engagement (e.g. anxiety), and socio-demographic factors. Approach: The authors derive the REM through a three-step procedure: (1) an extensive literature review, (2) interactive feedback sessions with experts to confirm the model's academic and managerial relevance, and (3) an empirical test of the REM with field data (N = 583). The authors use a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation model and examine heterogeneity through a finite mixture model.

Design/methodology/approach

Around the globe, people are insufficiently engaged with retirement planning. The customer engagement literature offers rich insights into antecedents, outcomes, and barriers to engagement. However, customer engagement literature lacks insights into cognitive, emotional and behavioral factors that drive engagement in retirement planning, a utilitarian service context, which is important for financial well-being.

Findings

Beliefs such as perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy, together with trust and retirement anxiety, explain people's search for pension information. These factors can be used to define three clear, actionable segments of consumers.

Originality/value

The findings advance the customer engagement and transformative service research literature by generating insights on engagement with retirement planning, a utilitarian rather than hedonic service context that is especially relevant for financial well-being. The findings inform managerial practice and emphasize the relevance of including cognitive and emotional engagement factors that trigger behavioral engagement. The REM can help to improve pension communication. For example, the results indicate that marketers should stress the benefits of, rather than the barriers to, acquiring information.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 January 2023

Sunaina Gowan

This chapter will showcase interesting anecdotes from immigrant Indian professionals working in Australian companies. The central normative dilemma is whether immigrants surrender…

Abstract

This chapter will showcase interesting anecdotes from immigrant Indian professionals working in Australian companies. The central normative dilemma is whether immigrants surrender some aspects of their identity, such as language or fashion sense, to integrate into mainstream Australian culture and institutions. Assimilation is defined as ‘being absorbed into the dominant society’s cultural tradition and thereby losing one’s unique character’ (Garcia & Van Soest, 2006, p. 14). It was discovered that although some immigrants saw the workplace as a cause of ridicule and exclusion, others see it as a means of personal validation and inclusion.

Details

The Ethnically Diverse Workplace: Experience of Immigrant Indian Professionals in Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-053-8

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and…

31743

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 January 2023

Sunaina Gowan

Abstract

Details

The Ethnically Diverse Workplace: Experience of Immigrant Indian Professionals in Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-053-8

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2020

Vera Hagemann, Greta Ontrup and Annette Kluge

This paper aims to explore the influence of collective orientation (CO) on coordination and team performance for interdependently working teams while controlling for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of collective orientation (CO) on coordination and team performance for interdependently working teams while controlling for person-related and team variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 58 two-person-teams participated in a simulation-based firefighting task. The laboratory study took 2 h for each team. The effects of CO in tasks of increasing complexity were investigated under the consideration of control variables, and the relations between CO, coordination and team performance were assessed using a multivariate latent growth curve modeling approach and by estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models.

Findings

Team members high on CO performed significantly better than low-scoring members. The effect of CO on team performance was independent from an increasing task complexity, whereas the effect of CO on coordination was not. The effect of CO on team performance was mediated by coordination within the team, and the positive relation between CO and performance persists when including group efficacy into the model.

Research limitations/implications

As CO is a modifiable person-related variable and important for effective team processes, additional research on factors influencing this attitude during work is assumed to be valuable.

Practical implications

CO is especially important for highly interdependently working teams in high-risk-organizations such as the fire service or nuclear power plants, where errors lead to severe consequences for human beings or the environment.

Originality/value

No other studies showed the importance of CO for coordination and team performance while considering teamwork-relevant variables and the interdependence of work.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Mariano Rojas

The purpose of this paper is to use a subjective well-being approach to address a long-standing debate on informal employment: whether it is a low-quality or a high-quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a subjective well-being approach to address a long-standing debate on informal employment: whether it is a low-quality or a high-quality option. The literature generally refers to these options as exclusion vs exit. Policy makers often assume that informal employment constitutes a low-quality option.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on a mid-size survey from Mexico as well as on a group of subjective well-being indicators to explore whether people in informal employment display lower or higher well-being. Information on life satisfaction, job satisfaction, and satisfaction with some job-related attributes, satisfaction in other domains of life, and experiences of well-being is used to assess the situation of those in informal employment.

Findings

The empirical research finds that there are substantial differences in the socio-demographic and economic characteristics of those in formal and in informal employment. These differences in the population characteristics partially explain differences in subjective well-being. However, once these differences are taken into consideration there is little difference in subjective well-being between informal workers and formal ones. Hence, the paper concludes that in comparison with people in formal employment, informal employment is neither associated with a better life nor with a worse life. Neither the exclusion nor the exit view of informality is supported by the empirical evidence.

Practical implications

Contrary to common perceptions, informal employment does not constitute a low-quality option in the subjective well-being arena. This is a powerful message for policy makers who wish to maximize the employment-related well-being of its citizens. There may well be legitimate policy reasons why the degree of informality should be reduced. However, based on the findings in the Mexican context, the paper stipulates that reducing informal employment primarily on the grounds of greater general unhappiness is not one of them.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the relevant literature by studying informality from a subjective well-being perspective, which extends much beyond job satisfaction. No research on informal employment has previously used such a large set of subjective well-being indicators comprising variables such as life satisfaction, satisfaction in domains of life, and experiences of well-being.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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