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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Soonja Yeom, Derek L. Choi-Lundberg, Andrew Edward Fluck and Arthur Sale

This study aims to evaluate factors influencing undergraduate students’ acceptance of a computer-aided learning resource using the Phantom Omni haptic stylus to enable rotation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate factors influencing undergraduate students’ acceptance of a computer-aided learning resource using the Phantom Omni haptic stylus to enable rotation, touch and kinaesthetic feedback and display of names of three-dimensional (3D) human anatomical structures on a visual display.

Design/methodology/approach

The software was developed using the software development life cycle, and was tested by students enrolled in various bachelor degrees at three stages of development within the technology acceptance model, action research and design research methodology frameworks, using mixed methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis.

Findings

The learning system was generally well-accepted, with usefulness (72 ± 18, mean ± standard deviation, 0-100 visual analogue scale) rated higher (p < 0.001) than ease of use (57 ± 22). Ease of use ratings declined across the three versions as modules were added and complexity increased. Students with prior experience with 3D interfaces had higher intention to use the system, and scored higher on identification of anatomical structures. Students with greater kinaesthetic learning preferences tended to rate the system higher. Haptic feedback was considered the best aspect of the system, but students wanted higher spatial resolution and lower response times.

Originality/value

Previous research relating to haptic devices in medical and health sciences has largely focused on advanced trainees learning surgical or procedural skills. The present research suggests that incorporating haptic feedback into virtual anatomical models may provide useful multisensory information in learning anatomy at the undergraduate level.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

The county town of Berkshire—Reading—is a lively blend of old and new. Now a thriving industrial centre in the ‘Golden Belt’ which stretches westwards from London on both sides of…

Abstract

The county town of Berkshire—Reading—is a lively blend of old and new. Now a thriving industrial centre in the ‘Golden Belt’ which stretches westwards from London on both sides of the M4 motorway, it enjoys a reputation for its fine university as well as its industry. A modern shopping zone contrasts with the attractions of greater interest for art and history lovers, such as museums and art galleries, and the ruins of the Norman Abbey founded in 1121, where Henry 1 lies buried. For the literary record, Oscar Wilde wrote his famous ‘Ballad of Reading Gaol’ and ‘De Profundis’ during his imprisonment in the town. Scenically, too, the Thames Valley hinterland has much to recommend it—leafy lanes, country walks, historic houses.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Case study
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Susan Bosco and Diane M. Harvey

The saga of Market Basket took place over a period of months during which a significant upheaval occurred in the long-successful business. The turmoil drew in a broad range of…

Abstract

Synopsis

The saga of Market Basket took place over a period of months during which a significant upheaval occurred in the long-successful business. The turmoil drew in a broad range of stakeholders. In a rare chain of events, non-unionized workers and managers engineered a change in senior management of the company. Their willingness to sacrifice their livelihoods in support of one person exemplifies the impact that can be made by a single, authentic, leader. This case draws upon secondary sources which provide insight into broad panoply of business and organizational behavior issues. The primary focus of the case, however, is leadership.

Research methodology

This case was developed using secondary sources and court documents that reported on the events that precipitated the problems at Market Basket as well as the strike and aftermath.

Relevant courses and levels

Management principles, organizational behavior. All undergraduate class levels would be appropriate.

Theoretical bases

This case exemplifies these three major theories in a real-life situation: stakeholder theory, corporate culture theory, organizational commitment.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Arthur D. Sharplin

In 1958, the Lincoln Electric Company of Cleveland, Ohio formalized its lifetime employment policy, which had already been in effect for many years. The company is the world's…

Abstract

In 1958, the Lincoln Electric Company of Cleveland, Ohio formalized its lifetime employment policy, which had already been in effect for many years. The company is the world's largest producer of arc‐welding products, employing nearly 3,000 people, mostly in two factories near Cleveland. There have been no layoffs at Lincoln since World War II. Since 1958, every Lincoln worker with over two years' longevity has been guaranteed work for at least thirty hours per week, forty‐nine weeks per year.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Elaine M. Worzala, Anne M. McCarthy, Tim Dixon and Andrew Marston

Presents findings from separate research projects conducted in the UK and the USA on the impact of e‐commerce on retailers and retail property. Examines differences between UK and…

10216

Abstract

Presents findings from separate research projects conducted in the UK and the USA on the impact of e‐commerce on retailers and retail property. Examines differences between UK and US retailers along several dimensions: Internet strategies, perceptions of the Internet, barriers to e‐commerce growth, and future space requirements. Overall, findings indicate that UK and US retailers have similar attitudes about e‐commerce. Specifically, retailers in both samples perceive little threat or impact from e‐commerce. Second, barriers to e‐commerce growth are similar for UK and US retailers and include fulfillment and security issues. Third, UK and US retailers indicate that their retail space needs will remain the same or increase in the short term, despite the threat of e‐commerce. Finally, both sets of retailers believe that entertainment is an important strategy if shopping centers are to remain viable.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Jennifer Slattery and Brenda G. Pitts

The purpose of this study was to examine the level of sponsorship awareness of season ticket holders and the change in the awareness over the duration of one American collegiate…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the level of sponsorship awareness of season ticket holders and the change in the awareness over the duration of one American collegiate football season through a sponsorship recall survey. The results showed that there were increases in the recall rates for eight of the nine actual sponsor companies used in the study from the beginning to the end of the season; however, only three of these differences were statistically significant.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1972

Preston Witts

Take an oil sealing ring made of cast‐iron, try to bend it, and it ‘gives’ only slightly. Do the same with a ring made of PTFE—or, to spell it out, polytetrafluroethylene—and you…

Abstract

Take an oil sealing ring made of cast‐iron, try to bend it, and it ‘gives’ only slightly. Do the same with a ring made of PTFE—or, to spell it out, polytetrafluroethylene—and you will be able to manipulate it as you wish.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 72 no. 7-8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Leighann Neilson and Erin Barkel

This paper aims to present a history of the marketing of hope chests in the USA, focusing in particular on one very successful sales promotion, the Lane Company’s Girl Graduate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a history of the marketing of hope chests in the USA, focusing in particular on one very successful sales promotion, the Lane Company’s Girl Graduate Plan. The Girl Graduate Plan is placed within its historical context to better understand the socioeconomic forces that contributed to its success for a considerable period but ultimately led to decreased demand for the product.

Design/methodology/approach

The history of the marketing of hope or marriage chests draws upon primary sources located in the Lane Company Collection at the Virginia Museum of History and Culture. Secondary sources and images of advertising culled from Google image searches provided additional insight into the operation of the company’s Girl Graduate Plan.

Findings

While the Lane Company benefitted in the form of increased sales, profit and brand awareness and loyalty from prevailing socio-economic trends, which supported the success of its Girl Graduate Plan, including targeting the youth market, this promotion ultimately fell victim to the company’s failure to stay abreast of social changes related to the role of women in society.

Research limitations/implications

Like all historical research, this research is dependent upon the historical sources that are accessible. The authors combined documents available from the Virginia Historical Society archives with online searches, but other data sources may well exist.

Practical implications

This history investigates how one manufacturer, a leader in the North American industry, collaborated with furniture dealers to promote their products to young women who were about to become the primary decision makers for the purchase of home furnishings. As such, it provides an historical example of the power of successful collaboration with channel partners. It also provides an example of innovation within an already crowded market.

Social implications

The hope chest as an object of material culture can be found in many cultures worldwide. It has variously represented a woman’s coming of age, the love relationship between a couple and a family’s social status. It has also served as a woman’s store of wealth. This history details how changing social values influenced the popularity of the hope chest tradition in the USA.

Originality/value

The history of the marketing of hope chests is an area that has not been seriously considered in consumption histories or in histories of marketing practices to date, in spite of the continuing sentimental appeal for many consumers.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Jana Brockhaus and Ansgar Zerfass

Corporate communications is often less successful when it is competing for influence with neighboring functions such as marketing or sales within organizations. This article…

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Abstract

Purpose

Corporate communications is often less successful when it is competing for influence with neighboring functions such as marketing or sales within organizations. This article addresses the internal positioning of communication departments by developing a conceptual framework which helps to understand, analyze and optimize their standing in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a literature review across several disciplines (e.g. organizational communication, strategic management) and supported by 26 qualitative in-depth interviews with board members, executives and communicators in a global industry company. By combining the theoretical and empirical insights, a framework for positioning communication departments within organizations was developed.

Findings

The framework depicts seven strategies (e.g. expectation and impression management, supporting ambassadors from other departments) and three spheres of influence (organizational integration, internal perceptions and social capital) to strengthen the position of corporate communications.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework has been supported by one case study so far, and future research may further develop and verify it by applying it to a larger number of companies in different industries.

Practical implications

Practitioners can use the framework as an analytical tool to reflect the current situation in their organization and identify opportunities for strengthening it.

Originality/value

This article introduces a novel view in the academic debate about the role and influence of corporate communications. It establishes a framework that helps to identify different drivers and strategies, and lays ground for future research.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1971

A MOVEMENT based on what many will think a revolutionary idea is spreading rapidly through Germany's industrial and commercial life. Since anything which may be a contributory…

Abstract

A MOVEMENT based on what many will think a revolutionary idea is spreading rapidly through Germany's industrial and commercial life. Since anything which may be a contributory factor in so successful an economy is important it is worth considering.

Details

Work Study, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

1 – 10 of over 5000