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Book part

Gary D. Libecap

SESSION I: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Abstract

SESSION I: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

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University Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-359-4

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Book part

Arthur A. Boni and S. Thomas Emerson

We examine the challenges of commercialization of university-developed technology and the synergistic relationship of the university's technology transfer office with…

Abstract

We examine the challenges of commercialization of university-developed technology and the synergistic relationship of the university's technology transfer office with business-school-based entrepreneurship education programs. We postulate that business schools can effectively augment the university technology transfer office in developing and growing successful startups, through catalyzing the process of startup creation and by actively assisting in the formation of multi-disciplinary leadership teams for spinout companies. The assistance of the business school's alumni and entrepreneur networks can also be leveraged for both mentoring and investment. The challenges of an effective program include securing early marketing input, building effective leadership teams, negotiating the terms of technology licenses, and developing the enthusiasm and cooperation of faculty researchers. At Carnegie Mellon, we have developed an integrated entrepreneurship education program focused on opportunity recognition and strategy development, team building and leadership development, and resource acquisition and allocation. Our program actively assists in launching and supporting the resulting spinout companies by connecting entrepreneurs with value-added investors, support networks, and partners. In addition, we monitor and mentor the spinout companies through their startup and growth stages. Our program includes an aggressive cross-campus initiative in which we teach entrepreneurship courses in the science, engineering, and computer science schools (in addition to the business school) and conduct seminar series to reach faculty and graduate students within those areas of the university. We are aided in the program by the enlightened technology transfer policies that Carnegie Mellon adopted in 2001. The rationale and objectives of those policies are explained in a lengthy appendix. We illustrate the effectiveness of the model through discussion of three recent spinout companies. We conclude that university entrepreneurship education programs can significantly enhance the effectiveness of university technology transfer programs. To optimize that result, the entrepreneurship education program should extend beyond the walls of the business school and should actively assist in the creation of well thought-out business plans and the formation of well-balanced leadership teams actively monitored and mentored by the business school and its alumni and entrepreneur networks. Additionally, it is necessary to tailor the program to the specific character and needs of the region.

Details

University Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-359-4

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Book part

Abstract

Details

University Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-359-4

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

University Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-359-4

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Abstract

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Our Future in Public Relations: A Cautionary Tale in Three Parts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-599-3

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Book part

Kyoungsu Kim, Fred Dansereau and In Sook Kim

Using five categories summarized by Bass (1990), this chapter attempts to address three key questions about charismatic leadership:

  • (1)
    What are the key behavioral…

Abstract

Using five categories summarized by Bass (1990), this chapter attempts to address three key questions about charismatic leadership:

  • (1)

    What are the key behavioral dimensions of charismatic leadership?

  • (2)

    How does charismatic leadership differ from other forms of leadership?

  • (3)

    Who may become followers of charismatic leaders and when do they become followers?

What are the key behavioral dimensions of charismatic leadership?

How does charismatic leadership differ from other forms of leadership?

Who may become followers of charismatic leaders and when do they become followers?

By focusing on Weber’s original view of charisma, we suggest that his three dimensions of charismatic leader behaviors underlie most contemporary approaches. By considering these three dimensions in more detail, we demonstrate how this view allows for different views of leadership and is distinguishable from management. Finally, by extending Weber’s view and by identifying two types of charismatic leaders who differ in their power motives, we suggest how the characteristics of followers and the context influence followers’ acceptance of charismatic leaders as legitimate. Some implications for leadership effectiveness are discussed.

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Transformational and Charismatic Leadership: The Road Ahead 10th Anniversary Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-600-2

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Article

As has been said, the commercial “infants' food,” leaving on one side the condensed milk, is almost invariably a powder, and, as such, should conform in composition as…

Abstract

As has been said, the commercial “infants' food,” leaving on one side the condensed milk, is almost invariably a powder, and, as such, should conform in composition as nearly as possible to a dried human milk. Of course, the preparations are not altogether free from water. From a large number of analyses it appears that the percentage in the great majority of cases varies between 4 and 8, the maximum being 13.9 and the minimum under 1. The average is approximately 6.5 per cent.

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British Food Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Alison Douglas

THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION, though not the only one, has been made by Scottish authors, both by the well‐known ones, such as R. L. Stevenson and J. M. Barrie, in whose work…

Abstract

THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION, though not the only one, has been made by Scottish authors, both by the well‐known ones, such as R. L. Stevenson and J. M. Barrie, in whose work their Scottish origin has played its part, and by others, like Norman Macleod and Ian Maclaren, whose reputation scarcely extended outside their native country or has been since forgotten.

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Library Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

THE changes in London local government which came into operation on 1st April, 1965, cut across the existing regional library bureaux organisation.

Abstract

THE changes in London local government which came into operation on 1st April, 1965, cut across the existing regional library bureaux organisation.

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Francisco Szekely and Heidi Strebel

This article was developed to provide a viewpoint for the 10th Annual EABIS Colloquium on Strategic Innovation for Sustainability held at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland on

Abstract

Purpose

This article was developed to provide a viewpoint for the 10th Annual EABIS Colloquium on Strategic Innovation for Sustainability held at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland on 3-4 July 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a framework of three practices that must be applied to an ever-increasing degree along the spectrum of strategic innovation for sustainability.

Findings

To reap the benefits of innovation for sustainability, businesses need to adapt the type of innovation they aim for to their particular context. Three practices are crucial to the innovation process – i.e. an integrated approach, multiple partnerships and visionary leadership from the top. These practices address two of the main challenges companies face in innovating for sustainability, namely actively engaging with the wider dynamic context in which they operate, and spanning boundaries they are not used to crossing.

Practical implications

By analysing the specific context in which a business operates, it is possible to form a better idea of where on the spectrum a particular company may focus its efforts in order to have the greatest chances of success.

Social implications

The analyses in this paper contribute to the debate and practical realisation of sustainable development.

Originality/value

While many studies distinguish between continuous versus discontinuous change as the two ends on a spectrum, the authors extend the spectrum to include three major points from incremental to radical to game-changing systemic innovation for sustainability. The three critical practices must be applied to an ever-increasing degree along the spectrum.

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