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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Richard Fletcher

Public libraries in the UK are increasingly expected to provide arts activities and events as part of their usual operations. The purpose of this paper is to summarise…

Abstract

Purpose

Public libraries in the UK are increasingly expected to provide arts activities and events as part of their usual operations. The purpose of this paper is to summarise recent policy trends in this direction from both the perspective of libraries’ and the arts sector. A touring theatre project aimed at children and families is discussed in further detail to examine some of the outcomes of these policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper will present a brief history of policy developments and debate in this area. Mixed method findings from the research element of “Among Ideal Friends” will be discussed, having used surveys and interviews with audiences and librarians, geodemographic profiling, box office records and library card data.

Findings

Public funding across both libraries and the arts has decreased at a national and local level, though both sectors are encouraged to work together to share expertise and community knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The primary funding for the project was an arts funding body. While a holistic approach to evaluation was taken, this limited any specific focus that might have been given to educational outcomes or cost-benefit analysis compared to other interventions.

Practical implications

Public libraries can see the results and challenges of a successful regional touring theatre project for consideration in their own activity planning, especially those related to families and younger users.

Social implications

Libraries and Arts organisations have different priorities in regards to these areas. Though co-operative, the situation is not without tension. The topic is illustrative of some wider debates around cultural value, everyday participation and cultural democracy.

Originality/value

This paper offers a timely discussion of cultural policy in relation to libraries, e.g. The Society of Chief Librarians “Universal Cultural Offer” (October 2017).

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Amanda K. Gluibizzi

The purpose of this paper is to report on the outreach activities of the Fine Arts Library at Ohio State University.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the outreach activities of the Fine Arts Library at Ohio State University.

Design/methodology/approach

Outreach at Ohio State is intended to have global impact, but successful outreach is often hampered by lack of partnerships, funding restrictions, and a monolithic approach to the patron. The paper reflects on each of these issues and discusses the strategies used by the Fine Arts Library to conduct outreach with user‐focus and budgets in mind.

Findings

The paper finds that there are techniques for outreach that involve small outputs of funds but have larger impacts. Moving past a “one size fits all” philosophy for outreach allows the Fine Arts Library to connect with the patrons it is best able to serve.

Originality/value

While the phrase “think globally, act locally” is well‐known, it can often be forgotten in libraries, where the goal to reach as many people as possible is very important. This paper suggests that the returns on the local investment are incredibly important to the global missions of libraries.

Details

Library Review, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Diane Arrieta and Jacqueline Kern

The purpose of this paper is to examine science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM) efforts at Florida Atlantic University’s (FAU) John D. MacArthur…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM) efforts at Florida Atlantic University’s (FAU) John D. MacArthur Campus Library (JDM) to share methodologies and ideas with other academic libraries. Recently, there has been an emphasis on and push for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in colleges and universities across the USA as a means for training future work forces and for remaining competitive in global job markets (Land, 2013). FAU in South Florida is a big proponent of STEM and STEAM education (Florida Atlantic University, 2012; Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, 2013).

Design/methodology/approach

As many librarians and outreach staff strive to remain relevant to their faculty and students with changing technologies (Drewes and Hoffman, 2010), the FAU JDM outreach staff have developed several novel programs that are geared toward the STEAM initiative.

Findings

The Library Outreach Committee at FAU was committed to investigating how they could advance student success through visual arts programming. How can the library help contribute to STEAM education for the students and learning community as a whole? How can the library engage art students? Can the library promote dialogue in arts to the faculty and staff, regardless of their disciplines? This article will describe and discuss the various art outreach programs that the JDM has tested and their outcomes addressing goals toward STEAM education and academic libraries.

Originality/value

The objective in sharing the experiences at the JDM is to spark new and successful program ideas at other academic libraries across the country and abroad and create knowledge in this relatively new area.

Details

New Library World, vol. 116 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

William S. Hemmig

The purpose of this paper is to examine the literature on the information behavior of practicing visual artists to determine if a consistent model emerges and what further…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the literature on the information behavior of practicing visual artists to determine if a consistent model emerges and what further research is necessary.

Design/methodology/approach

Works dealing with the information needs and uses relevant to the creative activities of visual artists are discussed in the paper. These works are assessed for their contributions toward understanding of the specific information behaviors of practicing artists.

Findings

The results show that a consistent model of artists' information behavior emerges. However, nearly all of the literature focuses on art students, academic art faculty, or librarians, and so any claim that practicing artists fit the model is largely unsupported by research. There have been no published studies of communities of practicing visual artists. The implications of defining artists as communities of practice are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Research is proposed that studies the information behavior of communities of practicing visual artists in order to confirm or amend the existing model.

Practical implications

Practitioners will have their attention drawn to an underserved user population whose information needs and behaviors have not been directly targeted for research. They will recognize the need for study of their own artist communities and the development of services for them.

Originality/value

This paper directs the discussion of artists' information behavior away from the artlibrary‐specific literature, where it has largely resided, as a means of adjusting the focus of research onto the largely unstudied and underserved communities of practicing artists.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1956

J.L. HOWGEGO

I can think of no better way of beginning this paper than by defining a Fine Arts Library; and no better definition of a Fine Arts Library than that given by Mr. Wheen in…

Abstract

I can think of no better way of beginning this paper than by defining a Fine Arts Library; and no better definition of a Fine Arts Library than that given by Mr. Wheen in describing the Victoria and Albert Museum Library. It is, he says, a library for the study of the history, philosophy, technique and appreciation of the arts. The arts referred to are of course what are generally known as the Fine Arts, and those, for the purposes of this paper, are in three main classes: Painting, which includes sculpture, drawing and applied fine art; Architecture, which includes town planning; and Music, with which we may include the dance, the drama, and other entertainment arts developing from them.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2014

Casey D. Hoeve, Ellen R. Urton and Thomas W. Bell

From 2007 to 2009, Kansas State University Libraries (K-State Libraries) committed to strategically assess and redevelop their organizational structure. The Libraries

Abstract

From 2007 to 2009, Kansas State University Libraries (K-State Libraries) committed to strategically assess and redevelop their organizational structure. The Libraries’ Strategic Plan and position redistributions commenced in 2007 and 2009 respectively, with adjustments in 2010 to accommodate the university’s K-State 2025 Strategic Plan. Together, these changed the roles of former subject librarians, dividing and transferring responsibilities for outreach, reference, instruction, and collection development. Among the more significant changes was the creation of departments devoted to patron groups, rather than specific academic disciplines. Illustrating how the reorganization changed the roles of traditional library services, this chapter outlines the responsibilities of three librarian positions: Undergraduate and Community Services, Faculty and Graduate Services, and Content (collection) Development. The librarians are also founding members of the K-State Libraries Arts Matrix, an ad hoc team operating within the new organization to enhance communication and expand subject expertise in the visual and performing arts. These transitions presented both opportunities for engagement and specialization, as well as challenges to communication and subject identity. These issues are addressed, including solutions offered by the matrix model. Although this study is limited by the neoteric existence of this model, and lack of precedents for comparison, K-State Libraries’ example may offer a viable model for institutions adapting to fiscal realities. Additionally, matrices may supplement the traditional subject librarian model for those seeking to enhance engagement and collaboration. This chapter offers further insight into a strategic planning process, as well as a transparent, inclusive strategy for librarians adjusting to organizational change.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Ken Yiu Kwan Fan, Patrick Lo, Kevin K.W. Ho, Stuart So, Dickson K.W. Chiu and Eddie H.T. Ko

This paper aims to study the information needs and online information-seeking behaviors on mobile platforms of performing arts students at a college level.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the information needs and online information-seeking behaviors on mobile platforms of performing arts students at a college level.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey instruments were used to collect data from performing arts students at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts (HKAPA), a metropolitan’s major performing arts tertiary institution. Data collected were analyzed through descriptive statistics and other statistical methods, and the music-related students were compared with the production-related students.

Findings

The result reveals that performing arts students all owned their mobile devices and often used mobile apps for non-academic purposes, but they did not often use mobile library services or read online academic contents with their mobile devices. The participants considered inadequate signal coverage, slow loading time, difficulty in reading on a mobile device and the lack of specialized mobile apps as more significant barriers affecting their usage. There are some significant differences between the music-related and production-related student groups in that music-related students watched lectures on the library websites and used electronic music scores more often than the production-related students.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the input for enhancements and policies to future mobile services and facilities of performing art libraries.

Originality/value

There have been scant studies on the mobile learning needs of performing arts students, especially in Asia.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1950

R.L. COLLISON

THE wealth of special and general libraries in Great Britain justifies the assertion that there are few serious inquiries which cannot be answered satisfactorily by one or…

Abstract

THE wealth of special and general libraries in Great Britain justifies the assertion that there are few serious inquiries which cannot be answered satisfactorily by one or other of them. In the field of fine arts Britain is especially strong and, although the majority of the great collections on this subject are concentrated in London, the existence of important art libraries—particularly on the subjects of textiles and ceramics—in the provinces must not be overlooked. Moreover, the sources of information on the fine arts comprise not only the special libraries and the appropriate departments of the university libraries but also the special departments of several great public libraries—such as the Hornby Collection at Liverpool—the private collections of experts such as the Raymond Mander and Joe Mitchenson Theatre Research Collection, and the information bureaux such as those maintained by trade organizations and by various foreign governments.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871…

Abstract

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that date two extensions to the building have taken place. The first, in 1882, provided a separate room for both Reference and Lending libraries; the second, opened in 1938, provided a new Children's Department. Together with the original cost of the building, these extensions were entirely financed by Sir Peter Coats, James Coats of Auchendrane and Daniel Coats respectively. The people of Paisley indeed owe much to this one family, whose generosity was great. They not only provided the capital required but continued to donate many useful and often extremely valuable works of reference over the many years that followed. In 1975 Paisley Library was incorporated in the new Renfrew District library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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