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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Robert J. Blomme, Jenny Sok, Arjan van Rheede and Debbie M. Tromp

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry…

Abstract

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry should carefully consider the work–family balance of their employees because maintaining a good balance will result in lower costs, lower sick rates, and lower staff turnover. The term “balance” refers to the way in which work interferes with life at home and how home life interferes with work. It includes both the positive and negative effects that work has on the family domain and vice versa. As research on the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship is scarce with regard to work–family interference, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular time commitment, can explain work–family conflict, while job content can explain work–family enrichment. In addition, the study revealed that with the appearance of gender as a moderator, different additional factors may play a role in work–family enrichment and work–family conflict. Furthermore, it revealed that family structure is not a predictor for work–family interference. This paper discusses managerial implications and offers recommendations for further research.

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Arjan van Rheede and Robert J. Blomme

The hospitality industry is starting to take responsibility for environmental sustainability. A strong focus on energy, waste, and water usage is directly linked with…

Abstract

The hospitality industry is starting to take responsibility for environmental sustainability. A strong focus on energy, waste, and water usage is directly linked with financial benefits in the operation of the hoteliers. Practices connected to the social aspect of sustainability are less developed. The dominant utilitarian paradigm in managers’ decisions is a strong causal factor in the lack of systematic social activities. The economic driver seems to be too strong! The suggested research agenda will enable us to better explain this phenomenon in which companies include sustainable development in their strategy – as long as the benefits are visible. In this agenda a broad definition of sustainability is needed and more attention should be paid to the different stakeholders. Next to this stakeholder perspective also additional approaches such as change management are necessary. In line with this multiple-perspective approach both qualitative and quantitative methods to research the practices in and the motives for a more sustainable hospitality industry, are needed. Finally to understand motives and actual behavior of employee and guest toward sustainable alternatives, more experiment research designs are needed.

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Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the theory of Strategy-as-Practices (S-as-P) (Jarzabkowski & Spee, 2009; Satyro, Sacomano, Contador, Almeida, & Giannetti, 2017), by looking into praxis, practices and practitioners, for better understanding how sustainability can be seen as part of the competitive advantage achieved by an integrated business strategy.

The United Nations has formulated the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals. Within the tourism and hospitality industry, although governmental organizations continue to play an important role for these initiatives, increasing number of industrial stakeholders are contributing by having sustainable oriented goals integrated in their business strategy. Traditionally, companies incorporate Corporate Social Responsibility programmes into their business strategy (Frynas & Yamahaki, 2016). However, these corporate responsibility programmes have not always been integrated as part of their strategic development. Moreover, due to the absence of the clear strategic sustainable goals, these corporate responsible practices lead to unclear integration of stakeholders' roles and their impacts to the industry.

Several theoretical approaches are possible to analyses the behaviour of practitioners leads to sustainable practices (Satyro et al., 2017). With this chapter, we show how S-as-P theory can be used in analyzing the implementation of corporate responsibility within business strategies the hospitality industry.

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Arjan van Rheede, Debbie Tromp and Robert J. Blomme

This paper reports on the initial results of a case study on management-level turnover in the hospitality industry and on factors influencing the career decisions of…

Abstract

This paper reports on the initial results of a case study on management-level turnover in the hospitality industry and on factors influencing the career decisions of highly educated employees to stay or leave the industry. This issue is considered using an interpretative paradigm and the conclusion drawn is that retaining these employees cannot be ensured by HRM policy alone. Both personal and general career factors are important, strongly influenced by social aspects. Furthermore, perceptions (deserved or undeserved) of the actual job, as well as characteristics of the industry, are important when deciding to pursue a career either within or outside the hospitality industry.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-675-1

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2010

Debbie M. Tromp, Arjan van Rheede and Robert J. Blomme

Turnover of highly educated employees in the hospitality industry is growing rapidly. A predictor of turnover in the hospitality industry recently put forward, but not yet…

Abstract

Turnover of highly educated employees in the hospitality industry is growing rapidly. A predictor of turnover in the hospitality industry recently put forward, but not yet fully researched, is psychological strain. This chapter investigates the role of psychological strain and organizational support in relation to affective commitment and turnover intentions. The results show that both psychological strain and organizational support were found to be significant predictors of turnover intentions. The effect of organizational support was partly mediated by psychological strain and fully by affective commitment. No significant interaction effects with gender were found. As organizational support is a precursor of both psychological strain and intention to leave and is in the scope of influence of a hospitality company, it could be a starting point for reducing turnover.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-718-9

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2008

Robert J. Blomme, Debbie M. Tromp and Arjan van Rheede

As management-level turnover is increasing rapidly, one of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly educated and highly skilled employees. As…

Abstract

As management-level turnover is increasing rapidly, one of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly educated and highly skilled employees. As the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship had not been investigated with regard to the hospitality industry, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular job content, can explain why there is a substantial amount of variance in intention among highly educated hotel employees with regard to leaving the organization, especially when the mediating role of affective commitment is taken into account. In this paper, managerial implications are discussed, and recommendations for further research are made.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1489-8

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Robert Gallicano, Robert J. Blomme and Arjan van Rheede

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with…

Abstract

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with this information will make healthier menu choices (Mills & Thomas, 2008). Limited research has been performed in a restaurant setting measuring real rather than intended behavior. The purpose of this research experiment is to measure consumer response, in a full-service restaurant setting, to nutrition information on menu items and subsequently determine if consumers will use this information in their menu item choice. An experiment was conducted with 264 restaurant customers at a full-service a la carte restaurant. Customers chose from menu items labeled with or without a Healthy Choice® label. A logistic regression model was used to predict whether people would choose Healthy Choice menu items. Fifty-four percent of restaurant customers chose the healthy choice menu item. The logistic regression confirms that those people who desire nutrition information also use this information in their menu choice. The study concludes with recommendations for the industry on directing consumer menu choice toward healthier items.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-936-3

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Jeen Filz, Robert J. Blomme and Arjan van Rheede

Corporations in all industries recognize the demand for responsible business behavior and have developed corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs accordingly. This…

Abstract

Corporations in all industries recognize the demand for responsible business behavior and have developed corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs accordingly. This paper examines to which extent sustainability practices – unrelated to the actual ingredients of a consumable product – affect brand equity, taste perceptions, and perceived emotional value. In an experimental setting, effects were determined of the presence or lack of a sustainability-marketing message within a beer brand’s promotional material. The constructs were measured in a survey, and a PLS-SEM was used to analyze the results. In the factor model, all constructs proved to be sufficiently reliable and valid. The experiment’s results indicate that taste perception is positively influenced by the presence of a sustainability message.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-615-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Hospitality Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-266-4

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-718-9

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